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Public Events

Events, scientific meetings and exhibitions held by the Royal Society

Public Events

FREE EVENT

LIVESTREAMED EVENT

Prize Lecture

The Politics of DNA

Join us for the Royal Society David Attenborough Award Lecture 2021 given by Dr Adam Rutherford.

Monday 05 September 2022

09/05/2022

09/05/2022

All science is political. Though the scientific methods have been designed over the centuries to free our understanding of reality from the baggage of perceptive and psychological biases, and the grubby world of politics, it’s an ideal we strive for, but have never achieved. All new discoveries exist in the culture in which they are born, and are always susceptible to abuse. In this talk, Dr Adam Rutherford will be exploring how the abuses in his own fields of evolution and genetics – by politicians, ideologues and by scientists themselves – were central to the most heinous crimes of modern history. Adam will be arguing that scientists must know their own histories, and how Darwin’s phrase ‘ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge’ should be a mantra for our times. The Royal Society David Attenborough Award and Lecture is awarded annually to an individual for outstanding public engagement with science. The award, open to everyone, recognises high quality public engagement activities. The award is named after the United Kingdom’s best-loved naturalist and broadcaster, and honorary Fellow of the Royal Society, David Attenborough. In 2021, this award was given to Dr Adam Rutherford for his contribution to strengthening public confidence in science through radio, TV, films, talks and books, and in particular, for challenging racist pseudoscience.Attending the event This lecture will take place at the Royal Society (this is an in-person event) on 5 September at 7pm BST. This event will be recorded (including the live Q&A) and the recording will be available on YouTube soon after the event The event is free to join Live subtitles will be available The lecture will be livestreamed onto this webpage, this does not require any registration. This page will update with a livestream on the day as well as a link to participate in the live Q&A For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

The Royal Society

theroyalsociety prizelecture freeevents liveevents upcomming

FREE EVENT

Open House

Open House 2022

Your chance to explore the history and architectural highlights of Carlton House Terrace, the home of the UK’s national academy of science.

17 – 18 September 2022

09/17/2022

09/18/2022

On 17 and 18 September 2022, Open House, the largest annual festival of architecture and design, returns to the capital. Over the weekend, visitors are invited to discover the secrets of the Grade I listed, Nash-designed town houses that are currently home to the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence.Uncover countless treasures behind the doors of 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, including portraits of Royal Society Fellows dating back to the 1600s, an ornate mother-of-pearl inlay ceiling, and features from the building’s time as the pre-WWII German Embassy.See this 19th century building by joining one of our free guided tours hosted by staff from the Royal Society’s library team or explore at your own pace with our free self-guided tour, available to collect on the day. Please note, places are limited for our free guided tours and you must book your spot at the building on the day of the tour.What is Open House?Open House is a simple but powerful concept: hundreds of great buildings of all types and periods open up their doors to all, completely without charge. This unique opportunity to access and understand architecture is a chance to look at everyday buildings anew and communicates the value of a well-designed city to everybody who uses it. For more information visit the Open House website.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.Attending the eventFree to attendNo registration requiredDoors will open from 10am – 5pm on Saturday and Sunday. Last entry will be at 4.15pmTours of the building can be booked free of charge upon arrival at the building on the dayAs this is a popular event, please be prepared to queue Travel and accessibility information

The Royal Society

Free Event

theroyalsociety openhouse freeevents upcomming

PAST EVENT

History Of Science

Wolfson Foundation History Prize 50th Anniversary

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Wolfson History Prize, join the Royal Society and the Wolfson Foundation for a discussion on history and science, in partnership with BBC History Magazine.

Thursday 14 July 2022

07/14/2022

07/14/2022

This panel will be chaired by Professor Alice Roberts, biological anthropologist, television presenter and author, and will include medical historian Lindsey Fitzharris (shortlisted for the Wolfson History Prize 2018), early modern historian Sasha Handley (shortlisted for the Wolfson History Prize 2017), and historian of science Sanjoy Bhattacharya.  The panel will discuss how history can contribute to contemporary science debates, drawing on their research on areas including Tudor approaches to sleep, Victorian surgery, and global health histories. The event will be hosted in the Wolfson Rooms at the Royal Society at 6-9 Carlton House Terrace. Advance booking is required – tickets are free and can be booked via eventbrite. The conversation will be available as a HistoryExtra podcast after the event.Attending this event Free to attend Registration required Please contact us about specific travel or accessibility information and requirements, and all other enquiries at development@royalsociety.org

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Touch sensing in animals, humans and robots

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Sunday 10 July 2022

07/10/2022

07/10/2022

Join the Animal Motion and Sensing (AniMAS) Lab from Manchester Metropolitan University, to explore touch sensing in animals, humans and robots. You will also be able to try out tactile matching games, dress up and build your own whisker masks!Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Street Science Busking

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Sunday 10 July 2022

07/10/2022

07/10/2022

 Street Scientists by name, street scientists by trade, meet the team from Newcastle University who have mastered the art of science busking. From mind warping optical illusions to getting jiggy to the sound of a slinky, their demonstrations are sure to amaze and excite.What does ketchup in a bottle of water have in common with a submarine? And, how can someone guess your birthday using only binary numbers? You’ll have to bump into the Street Scientists roaming around the exhibition to find out.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Kids’ Zone

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Sunday 10 July 2022

07/10/2022

07/10/2022

How do humans affect the natural world and which places on Earth are free from human interference? What was life like before antibiotics? What is the Kuiper Belt and the Oort Cloud?Visit the Little House of Science team where inquisitive young minds can find the answers to life’s biggest questions. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for children under 10 Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

A hard nut to crack: How diet shapes the squirrel skull

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Sunday 10 July 2022

07/10/2022

07/10/2022

Did you know that red squirrels adapt to the food they eat? Meet Dr Phil Cox and find out more about his research into how squirrel skulls have changed depending on their diets and why we should think about what we put out in our gardens for creatures.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Dr Zoo’s Travelling Science Lab

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Sunday 10 July 2022

07/10/2022

07/10/2022

As one of Dr Zoo’s assistants, you will employ different scientific skills as virologists, vaccinologists, bio-matheticians, and biosafety experts to help evade the deadly disease in Pirbright Institute’s new escape room. Working against the clock you will have to solve three different science-themed puzzles to crack the final code so you can escape the virus in under 5 minutes!Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Stitch’n’stem

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Saturday 09 July 2022

07/09/2022

07/09/2022

Real research images from the Centre for Gene Therapy & Regenerative Medicine at King’s College London have been translated into beautiful embroidery templates. Embroider your own artwork whilst discovering the exciting research being done by the team. This activity is organised in collaboration with the NIHR Guy’s and St Thomas’ Biomedical Research Centre. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

The Royal Society

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Summer Science Exhibition Live

This online event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Saturday 09 July 2022

07/09/2022

07/09/2022

Can’t make it to London for Summer Science this year? Simply set up a screen and watch us on YouTube for a special free live programme direct from the exhibition. Join award-winning engineer and communicator Anna Ploszajski for an afternoon of remarkable science. From finding out how llamas are fighting viruses to what extreme space weather is and why it’s important, the Summer Science Exhibition will be streaming straight to you. Whether you join us live and watch together with your friends and family, or catch-up afterwards on the Royal Society YouTube channel, don’t miss this exclusive Summer Science experience. Attending the event The event will be livestreamed Free to attend No registration required Suitable for all ages This event will also be recorded and the recording will be available on YouTube soon after the event.For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

Online

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Street Science Busking

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Saturday 09 July 2022

07/09/2022

07/09/2022

Street Scientists by name, street scientists by trade, meet the team from Newcastle University who have mastered the art of science busking. From mind warping optical illusions to getting jiggy to the sound of a slinky, their demonstrations are sure to amaze and excite.What does ketchup in a bottle of water have in common with a submarine? And, how can someone guess your birthday using only binary numbers? You’ll have to bump into the Street Scientists roaming around the exhibition to find out.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Cyanotype making workshop

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Saturday 09 July 2022

07/09/2022

07/09/2022

In October 1843 a package of blue and white photographs was delivered to the Royal Society by botanist Mrs Anna Atkins. Anna’s cyanotype images, combining botany with photochemistry, became one of the most treasured items in the Royal Society Library and Archives collection and led to her being considered the first female photographer. Now you have a chance to create them too!Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for children under 10 Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Meet the plant scientists

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Saturday 09 July 2022

07/09/2022

07/09/2022

Experience what it is like to be a plant scientist at the Sci-Seedlets station. Explore fascinating facts about plants, discover the cutting edge of plant science research or play plant-inspired games.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Kids’ Zone

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Saturday 09 July 2022

07/09/2022

07/09/2022

How do humans affect the natural world and which places on Earth are free from human interference? What was life like before antibiotics? What is the Kuiper Belt and the Oort Cloud?Visit the Little House of Science team where inquisitive young minds can find the answers to life’s biggest questions. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for children under 10 Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Guided Walk: Discover the hidden wildlife of St James’s Park

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Saturday 09 July 2022

07/09/2022

07/09/2022

Join biologists from The Royal Parks for a free guided walk to learn about the wildlife found in St James’s Park. The walk will take place every hour and last for 30 minutes. This activity is suitable for both kids and adults.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for all ages Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Friends and foes in our ponds

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Saturday 09 July 2022

07/09/2022

07/09/2022

Ponds are full of diverse and wonderfully complex microbes. Discover some of those microbes and why how they interact with each other is so important and what it means for tadpoles in this drop-in station where you can also prepare pond water samples, image microbes or become a citizen scientist. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Dr Zoo’s Travelling Science Lab

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2022. 

Saturday 09 July 2022

07/09/2022

07/09/2022

 As one of Dr Zoo’s assistants, you will employ different scientific skills as virologists, vaccinologists, bio-matheticians, and biosafety experts to help evade the deadly disease in Pirbright Institute’s new escape room. Working against the clock you will have to solve three different science-themed puzzles to crack the final code so you can escape the virus in under 5 minutes! Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Summer Science Exhibition 2022

The Summer Science Exhibition returns to central London!

06 – 10 July 2022

07/06/2022

07/10/2022

The Summer Science Exhibition returns to central London this July to highlight exciting research from across the UK. For the first time in three years, the annual exhibition will offer in person exhibits as well as digital content for 5 days: Wednesday 6 July   10:00 – 16:30 Thursday 7 July 10:00 – 16:30 Friday 8 July 10:00 – 18:00 Saturday 9 July 10:00 – 18:00 Sunday 10 July 10:00 – 18:00 Last entry time is 30 minutes before closing.The café finishes serving 30 minutes before close. From remote controlled healing to the science behind chocolate, this free event offers everyone the opportunity to come and meet the scientists behind the research. Sixteen research groups from across the UK will demonstrate their cutting-edge research through innovative experiences, from 3D printed displays, interactive models and digital games. And if you are not able to come to London for the event, there will be a full digital programme for you to experience the exhibition from your own homes. For schools and colleges:UK school groups are invited to attend the exhibition, as members of the public, although we suggest that you notify us in advance by emailing education@royalsociey.org to inform us of date, time of arrival and school party number to reduce potential waiting time. This year, the Schools Engagement team will be running specific career-focused talks, with the research teams, for students who are aged 14+. These sessions are for school groups of 25 max (students and teachers) and must be booked in advance to guarantee admittance – please email education@royalsociety.org for more information on how to book these sessions.Why not sign up to our newsletter and be the first to know all about this year’s event, or explore the 2021 digital version of the exhibition.Catch up on our YouTube playlist, or follow us on Twitter @royalsociety or Facebook @theroyalsociety.For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org

London

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PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

Lessons from modelling the pandemic

Join the Royal Society as we reflect on the scientific and policy implications of modelling the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic

Monday 13 June 2022

06/13/2022

06/13/2022

Submit your questions on Slido Modelling played a key role in understanding the scientific evidence surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic as well as informing policy decisions. This session of talks by our guest speakers will explain the basics of epidemiological modelling, the experience of modelling the pandemic, the environmental factors involved in virus transmission and the path from basic science through to policy, drawing on lessons from Covid-19. The talks will be followed by a Q&A session and discussion.Speakers Professor Adam Kucharski, Professor of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Professor Chris Budd OBE, Professor of Applied Mathematics, University of Bath Dr Louise Dyson, Associate Professor of Epidemiology, University of Warwick Attendee information This session will take place in front of a live audience at the Royal Society on 13 June at 7.30pm BST.  The event is free to join. Advance registration is essential for in-person attendance due to limited seating availability. Currently numbers for in-person attendance are limited so we are operating a waitlist however we expect to release batches of tickets in the run-up to the event. If after registering you are not able to attend, please cancel your ticket so others can attend. The event will also be livestreamed onto this webpage, this does not require any registration. If you wish to receive a reminder for the stream please book an online-only ticket and you will be sent a link to view the lecture. This page will update with a livestream on the day as well as a link to participate in the live Q&A. This event will also be recorded (including the live Q&A) and the recording will be available on YouTube soon after the event.  This event is organised by the Royal Society whose Rapid Assistance in Modelling the Pandemic (RAMP) initiative has drawn on a diverse range of disciplines to support the modelling community working on the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Latterly this has been through the organization of a series scientific meetings, of which this event forms a part. RAMP is funded by UKRI through grant number EP/V053507/1. 

The Royal Society

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

“A sex so little made to brave the thorns of science”: The historical representation of women in mathematics

From medieval times to the modern day, female mathematicians, real and fictional, have been represented in a variety of ways, both in pictures and in words. These depictions allow us to learn about the women…

Monday 06 June 2022

06/06/2022

06/06/2022

Professor June Barrow-Green, winner of the 2021 Wilkins-Bernal Medawar Medal, joined us to explore this as well as the deeper questions, like what effect do these moments captured in time have on modern-day viewers and readers? How did these representations shape the types of mathematical knowledge women were able to claim? Do they continue to marginalise the mathematical expertise of women? And how can they be used to encourage the participation of women in the mathematical community today?  This event was the 2021 Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Prize Lecture, which was awarded to recognise excellence in a subject relating to the history of science, philosophy of science or the social function of science. Professor June Barrow-Green was given the award for her research in 19th and 20th century mathematics, notably on historical roots of modern computing, dynamical systems and the three-body problem. Her work places special emphasis on the under-representation of women in historical narratives and in contemporary mathematics. Her recent work includes diversifying the mathematical curriculum. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

The Royal Society

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PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Imagine…Science: Thinking better – the art of the shortcut

Professor Marcus du Sautoy FRS talks to Dr Hannah Critchlow

Sunday 05 June 2022

06/05/2022

06/05/2022

How do you remember more and forget less? How can you earn more and become more creative just by moving house? And how do you pack a car boot most efficiently? Thinking Better offers clever strategies for daily complex problems via shortcuts. Shortcuts have enabled much of human progress, whether in constructing the first cities around the Euphrates 5,000 years ago, using calculus to determine the scale of the universe or in writing today’s algorithms that help us find a new life partner. The Oxford mathematician shares his shortcut to the art of the shortcut with neuroscientist Dr Hannah Critchlow.Hay Festival is back in-person for its 35th spring edition, bringing writers and readers together for inspiring conversations, debates, workshops and performances 26 May–5 June 2022. Over 11 days, this year’s programme promises a thrilling line-up of over 500 events, launching the best new fiction and nonfiction, while offering insights and debate around some of the biggest issues of our times in a programme of conversations featuring more than 600 award-winning writers, policy makers, pioneers, innovators and performers. Festivalgoers can explore the programme and book tickets at hayfestival.org/wales.Attending this event  This event will be held at Hay Festival, Hay-on-Wye, Wales Tickets can be purchased here

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PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Imagine…Science: Control – the dark history and troubling present of eugenics

Dr Adam Rutherford talks to Professor Veronica van Heyningen FRS

Thursday 02 June 2022

06/02/2022

06/02/2022

People have always sought to reduce suffering, eliminate disease or enhance desirable qualities in their children. But this goes hand-in-hand with the urge to impose control over who can procreate and ultimately who is permitted to live.In the Victorian era, in the shadow of Darwin’s ideas about evolution, a new full-blooded attempt to impose control over unruly biology developed and was enshrined in a political movement that bastardised science: eugenics. It was a cornerstone of the policies of the Third Reich and led directly to the gates of Auschwitz. Adam Rutherford’s Control tells the story of attempts by the powerful throughout history to dictate and dominate reproduction and regulate the interface of breeding and society. He talks to geneticist Professor Veronica van Heyningen FRS.Hay Festival is back in-person for its 35th spring edition, bringing writers and readers together for inspiring conversations, debates, workshops and performances 26 May–5 June 2022. Over 11 days, this year’s programme promises a thrilling line-up of over 500 events, launching the best new fiction and nonfiction, while offering insights and debate around some of the biggest issues of our times in a programme of conversations featuring more than 600 award-winning writers, policy makers, pioneers, innovators and performers. Festivalgoers can explore the programme and book tickets at hayfestival.org/wales.Attending this event  This event will be held at Hay Festival, Hay-on-Wye, Wales Tickets can be purchased here

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Imagine…Science: I Am a Book. I Am a Portal to the Universe.

Miriam Quick talks to Sharna Jackson 

Tuesday 31 May 2022

05/31/2022

05/31/2022

The winner of this year’s prize is a book like no other, where data can not only be visualised but also heard and touched. Join Young People’s Book Prize shortlist panel member and children’s author Sharna Jackson and data journalist and winning author Miriam Quick as they explore the wonders of our world through this year’s winner, I Am a Book. I Am a Portal to the Universe.The Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize aims to promote literacy in young people and to inspire them to read about science. Each year, the winner is selected by judging panels made up of thousands of young people at schools across the country.Hay Festival is back in-person for its 35th spring edition, bringing writers and readers together for inspiring conversations, debates, workshops and performances 26 May–5 June 2022. Over 11 days, this year’s programme promises a thrilling line-up of over 500 events, launching the best new fiction and nonfiction, while offering insights and debate around some of the biggest issues of our times in a programme of conversations featuring more than 600 award-winning writers, policy makers, pioneers, innovators and performers. Festivalgoers can explore the programme and book tickets at hayfestival.org/wales.Attending this event  This event will be held at Hay Festival, Hay-on-Wye, Wales Tickets can be purchased here

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Imagine…Science: Are astronauts extinct?

Lord Martin Rees FRS talks to Professor Catherine Heymans

Sunday 29 May 2022

05/29/2022

05/29/2022

Human journeys into space fill us with wonder. But the thrill of space travel for astronauts comes at enormous expense and is fraught with peril. As our robot explorers grow more competent, governments and corporations must ask, does our desire to send astronauts to the Moon and Mars justify the cost and danger? Lord Martin Rees FRS believes that beyond low-Earth orbit, space exploration should proceed without humans.The United Kingdom’s Astronomer Royal, Martin Rees was previously Professor of Astronomy and Director of the Institute of Astronomy at the University of Cambridge. His latest book, co-written with Donald Goldsmith, is The End of Astronauts. Professor Catherine Heymans is Astronomer Royal for Scotland.Hay Festival is back in-person for its 35th spring edition, bringing writers and readers together for inspiring conversations, debates, workshops and performances 26 May–5 June 2022. Over 11 days, this year’s programme promises a thrilling line-up of over 500 events, launching the best new fiction and nonfiction, while offering insights and debate around some of the biggest issues of our times in a programme of conversations featuring more than 600 award-winning writers, policy makers, pioneers, innovators and performers. Festivalgoers can explore the programme and book tickets at hayfestival.org/wales.Attending this event  This event will be held at Hay Festival, Hay-on-Wye, Wales Tickets can be purchased here

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

GREENBAT meets GREENCAT: towards delivering truly sustainable energy storage and conversion technologies

Kavli Medal and Lecture 2022 given by Professor Magda Titirici.

Thursday 05 May 2022

05/05/2022

05/05/2022

Submit your questions on Slido It is imperative we mitigate and then reverse carbon emissions. COP26 recently took place with the goal of a global commitment to keep a maximum of 1.5 C warming within reach.A green industrial revolution powered by many sustainable innovations evolving in parallel is essential.  Yet we need to make sure that this new revolution happens sustainably and does not create more damage. We must learn from past mistakes and learn how to see the bigger picture rather than immediate goals. Batteries and catalytic processes are key for delivering the green industrial revolution by storing the intermittent renewable energy and releasing it when is needed most to decarbonise our economy across various sectors. Yet, battery materials and catalysts for various sustainable technologies (such as green H2 generation and conversion) are facing real challenges as they are based on critical and expensive metals. Professor Titirici’s research group and collaborators are working towards addressing this important challenge of creating sustainable materials based on widely available resources while creating a circular economy of recycling biowaste into advanced materials and implementing them in sustainable energy technologies, from new battery chemistries to important catalytic processes using renewable electricity for H2 production and use. Attending the event This lecture will take place at the Royal Society (this is an in-person event) on 5 May at 6.30pm BST. This event will be recorded (including the live Q&A) and the recording will be available on YouTube soon after the event The event is free to join. Advance registration is essential due to seating availability Live subtitles will be available If after registering you are not able to attend, please cancel your ticket so others can attend The lecture will be livestreamed onto this webpage, this does not require any registration. If you wish to receive a reminder for the stream please book an online-only ticket and you will be sent a link to view the lecture. This page will update with a livestream on the day as well as a link to participate in the live Q&AThe awardThe Kavli Medal and Lecture is now awarded annually for excellence in all fields of science and engineering relevant to the environment. The medal is of bronze gilt and is accompanied by a gift of £1,000.Enquiries: contact the Events team.

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Visualising the molecules of life

The Leeuwenhoek Medal and Lecture 2022 given by Dr Sjors Scheres FRS.

Tuesday 26 April 2022

04/26/2022

04/26/2022

Submit questions via Slido We are intrigued by how proteins work. Our genetic code determines the amino acid sequence of proteins, which in turn determines their 3D structure. The precise 3D arrangement of thousands of atoms inside individual protein molecules allows them to perform the complicated tasks that are needed to keep us alive. Therefore, visualising the 3D atomic structures of proteins is a powerful way to find out more about how they work and what goes wrong in disease. Dr Scheres’ teams’ research focuses on the development and application of new methods for the study of protein structures by electron microscopy on frozen samples (cryo-EM).In this lecture, Dr Scheres will explain how recent developments in cryo-EM have led to an explosion of new protein structures, where we can now see details down to individual atoms. Dr Scheres will highlight how some of our developments in image processing algorithms, and their implementation in the open-source computer program RELION, are helping scientists around the world to learn more about how proteins work. As an illustration of what is possible nowadays, Dr Scheres will also describe how his team have applied their methods to study protein samples that they extract from human brain tissue, and how these experiments are leading to exciting new insights into what goes wrong in neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease and other conditions.Attending the event This lecture will take place at the Royal Society (this is an in-person event) on 26 April at 6.30pm BST. This event will be recorded (including the live Q&A) and the recording will be available on YouTube soon after the event.  The event is free to join. Advance registration is essential due to seating availability. Live subtitles will be available. If after registering you are not able to attend, please cancel your ticket so others can attend. The lecture will be livestreamed onto this webpage, this does not require any registration. If you wish to receive a reminder for the stream please book an online-only ticket and you will be sent a link to view the lecture. This page will update with a livestream on the day as well as a link to participate in the live Q&A. The awardThe Leeuwenhoek Medal and Lecture. It was originally established to recognise excellence in the field of microbiology but now also includes excellence in bacteriology, virology, mycology and parasitology, and microscopy. The lectureship was named after the Dutch microscopist Antonie van Leeuwenhoek FRS, often referred to as the ‘Father of Microbiology’, and is supported by a bequest from George Gabb. Originally it was held annually, and from 2006 to 2018 it was awarded triennially, but it is now awarded biennially. The lecture was first given in 1950. The medal is of bronze, is awarded biennially and is accompanied by a gift of £2,000.Enquiries: contact the Events team.

The Royal Society

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PAST EVENT

Conference

Aldabra Research Station 50th Anniversary Celebration Symposium at the Royal Society

A celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Aldabra research station, organised by the Royal Society and Seychelles Island Foundation.

Thursday 21 April 2022

04/21/2022

04/21/2022

In the 1960s, Aldabra had already seen the negative impact of man on its environment. In 1971, a Royal Society research station was established on Aldabra, a stepping stone not only to enhanced research but to enhanced protection. Subsequently, Aldabra has been recognised as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1982, as an Important Endemic Bird Area in 2001 and as a Ramsar Wetland Site of International Importance in 2010. The Royal Society and Seychelles Island Foundation are working together to put on this programme to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the station – both to look back at research that has been done, but also to draw attention to the importance of the scientific work still going on there, and to demonstrate its relevance in terms of current global challenges on both biodiversity and climate change going forward.Attending the event This event will be livestreamed on 21 April 2022 from 9am BST. Full programme information and livestream access is available on the symposium website.

The Royal Society

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Nutrient sensing by the brain in health and disease

The Croonian Medal and Lecture 2022 given by Sir Stephen O’Rahilly FMedSci FRS and Professor Sadaf Farooqi FMedSci FRS.

Thursday 14 April 2022

04/14/2022

04/14/2022

 Globally, over 1 billion people are overweight or obese. Obesity and its complications are associated with significant morbidity and mortality due to type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some forms of cancer. While the widespread availability of high calorie, palatable food and physical inactivity are major environmental drivers of the rise in prevalence of obesity, heritable factors play a substantial role in influencing a person’s propensity to gain weight (or not), within an obesogenic environment. In this lecture, Professors O’Rahilly and Farooqi will discuss how the identification of genes and the pathways they regulate has highlighted the fundamental role of the brain in modulating eating behaviour and body weight. They will discuss how studies of the leptin-melanocortin pathway have provided a mechanistic framework for understanding how body weight is regulated in humans, how energy status is coupled to reproduction and growth and how disruption of these neural mechanisms causes obesity. They will also discuss the impact of this work on societal perceptions of obesity and how targeting these mechanisms has provided new treatments for people with severe obesity.Attending the event This lecture will take place at The Royal Society (this is an in-person event) on 14 April at 6.30pm BST. This event will be recorded (including the live Q&A) and the recording will be available on YouTube soon after the event.  The event is free to join. Advance registration is essential due to seating availability. Live subtitles will be available. If after registering you are not able to attend, please cancel your ticket so others can attend. The lecture will be livestreamed onto this webpage, this does not require any registration. If you wish to receive a reminder for the stream please book an online-only ticket and you will be sent a link to view the lecture. This page will update with a livestream on the day as well as a link to participate in the live Q&A.The awardThe Croonian Medal and Lecture is the premier lecture in the biological sciences. The lectureship was conceived by William Croone FRS (PDF), one of the original Fellows of the Society. Among the papers left on his death in 1684 were plans to endow two lectureships, one at the Royal Society and the other at the Royal College of Physicians. His widow later bequeathed the means to carry out the scheme. The lecture series began in 1738. The medal is of silver gilt, is awarded annually and is accompanied by a gift of £10,000. Enquiries: contact the Events team.

The Royal Society

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PAST EVENT

Conference

Climate change: science, responses and research needs

Join the Royal Society as we reflect on the implications of the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report for the UK and urgent policy and research needs.

11 – 12 April 2022

04/11/2022

04/12/2022

You can watch the conference recording at: https://ipcc-ar6-conference.royalsociety.orgDownload the conference programme (PDF)The Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) delivers the starkest warning yet on the risks of climate change. Join the Royal Society as we bring together leading scientists, policy professionals and representatives from the energy and land use sectors to discuss the findings and implications of the latest IPCC AR6 reports. What is the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report?The IPCC Sixth Assessment Report provides the most comprehensive analyses of the latest climate science, impacts and vulnerabilities related to climate change. It highlights that immediate, rapid and large-scale reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are needed, alongside urgent actions to mitigate and adapt to climate change. IPCC reports underpin major international climate agreements, including the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement.The three Working Groups of the IPCC present the latest knowledge on: The physical science of climate change  Climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability  Mitigation of climate change: methods of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere Working Group I reported on the most up-to-date physical science knowledge on climate change in August 2021. It highlighted that climate change is widespread, rapid and intensifying. Working Group II published its report on impacts, adaptation and vulnerabilities at the end of February 2022 and Working Group III will publish a report on climate change mitigation at the beginning of April 2022. Structure of the ConferenceWe will hear from IPCC lead authors, working group chairs, policy professionals and representatives from the land-use and energy sectors as they reflect on the findings of the reports and explore the implications for policy and evidence-based action.Day 1 will consider the key findings of AR6, outcomes of COP26 and the implications for policy, land-use and the energy sector, and future IPCC activity. Day 2 will seek to identify the scientific research and collaborations needed to progress our knowledge of climate change and contribute to global climate policy and responses.Attending this event This event is free to attend and open to all. Both in-person and online attendance will be available. Limited places are available for in-person attendance Advance registration is essential. The conference will take place at the Royal Society, 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, London, SW1Y 5AG, and online. For enquiries contact the Resilient Futures team

The Royal Society

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PAST EVENT

Online

Can we bring animals back from extinction?

This panel brought together scientists from across the world to discuss the topic of de-extinction and how far the field of genetics has grown.

Wednesday 16 March 2022

03/16/2022

03/16/2022

From dinosaurs to dodos, woolly mammoths to Tasmanian tigers, many species have become extinct with more likely to follow this path in the near future. Conservation efforts around the world are working hard to stop more species from joining this fate, but what about those that we have already lost? Has science progressed far enough that as well as preventing more from becoming extinct, we could bring these creatures back? Or perhaps more importantly, should we bring them back?  SpeakersThe event was hosted by author, documentary filmmaker, broadcaster and National Geographic explorer Lucy Cooke, who was joined by: Professor Beth Shapiro, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz Professor George Church, Professor of Genetics and Health Sciences, Harvard University Professor Mike Benton OBE FRS, Professor of Vertebrate Paleontology, University of Bristol About British Science WeekBritish Science Week, run by the British Science Association is a ten-day celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths, featuring entertaining and engaging events and activities across the UK for people of all ages.

Online

microbiologyimmunologyanddevelopmentalbiology microbiologyimmunologyanddevelopmentalbiology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology online online pastevents

PAST EVENT

Online

Young People’s Book Prize 2021 Awards Ceremony

Who invented vaccines? How do you read Morse code? Can we stop climate change? How big are a spider’s eyes? And an anteater’s tongue?

Tuesday 08 March 2022

03/08/2022

03/08/2022

The shortlist for Young People’s Book Prize 2021 has launched children across the UK on a quest to meet inventors in past and present history, find answers to science’s hardest questions and discover new forms of life, from the incredible world of plants to the wonders of the night sky.This year, a record-breaking 537 UK schools, science clubs and groups have taken up the challenge of judging this year’s prize. Over 11,500 young judges have poured over the pages full of action, adventure and atoms and have now declared their winner. This year’s award ceremony hosted by BAFTA-winning TV presenter Lindsey Russell is an excellent occasion to meet the authors and discover this year’s winner. Don’t forget to grab a pen and paper as your knowledge of the shortlisted books will also be put to test in our brand-new Young People’s Book Prize Big Quiz!The Young People’s Book Prize is made possible thanks to the generosity of an anonymous donor. Discover more about the Prize here. The authors and illustrators joining the event were: Rose Hall, 100 Things to Know About Saving the Planet  Ruth Brocklehurst, 100 Things to Know About Saving the Planet  Sophie Deen, Agent Asha: Mission Shark Bytes  Stefanie Posavec, I Am a Book. I Am a Portal to the Universe. Miriam Quick, I Am a Book. I Am a Portal to the Universe. Michael Holland, I Ate Sunshine for Breakfast  Philip Giordano, I Ate Sunshine for Breakfast  Robert Winston, Inventors  Lisa Harvey-Smith, Under the Stars Mel Matthews, Under the Stars

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PAST EVENT

Online

Looking Ahead to the Third Human Genome Editing Summit

In partnership with the UK Academy of Medical Sciences, the US National Academies of Sciences and Medicine and The World Academy of Sciences, the Royal Society hosted a three-part series of online events looking…

07 – 09 March 2022

03/07/2022

03/09/2022

A year out from the Summit, the events focused on the key topics of the Summit’s agenda, including discussion of the recent reports from the International Commission on the Clinical use of Heritable Human Genome Editing and the WHO Expert Advisory Committee on Developing Global Standards for Governance and Oversight of Human Genome Editing. Presentations were followed by panel discussions, with some presentations having been pre-recorded, and available to watch separately.Access the eventPlease access the event to watch event recordings, see the full agenda and additional resources, including recorded presentations. You do not need to register.Event details7 March : Looking Ahead to the ScienceSpeakers: Yujia Cai, Shanghai JiaoTong University Amander Clark, University of California, Los Angeles Jennifer Doudna, University of California, Berkeley Julian Gillmore, University College London Chair: Robin Lovell-Badge, The Francis Crick InstitutePresentations discussed the state of the science and recent developments in somatic editing, including delivery mechanisms for genome editing in vivo, and germline editing, particularly developments in producing edited gametes. The following panel session discussed scientific barriers to securing the benefits of genome editing.8 March : Looking Ahead to the Equity & AccessSpeakers: Tania Bubela, Simon Fraser University Arafa Salim Said, Sickle Cell Disease Patients Community of Tanzania Adrian Towse, UK Office of Health Economics Ambroise Wonkam, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Chairs: Javier Guzman, Center for Global Development & Chris McCabe, Institute of Health EconomicsThis event discussed the health system and price barriers that must be addressed to ensure future access to innovative gene-editing therapies, including potential policy options for governments, industry, multilaterals, and other global health stakeholders. The first half of this session focused on health system barriers to access new somatic genome editing technologies, particularly in low- and middle- income countries. Revolutionary gene-editing therapies for the treatment of sickle cell disease have achieved exciting results in clinical trials and can potentially cure this chronic condition that affects around 6 million people worldwide, with sub-Saharan Africa accounting for three quarters of these cases. However, unless policy action is taken, these new technologies are likely to be unavailable, unaffordable, inaccessible and unacceptable for patients living in low-resource settings. The second half of this session focused on different ways to address price as a barrier to access in higher-income countries, both within the current research and development framework and beyond.9 March : Looking Ahead to the Governance Speakers: Daima Bukini, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences Alena Buyx, German Ethics Council & Technical University of Munich Andy Greenfield, University of Oxford Katie Hasson, Center for Genetics and Society Katherine Littler, World Health Organization Laurence Lwoff, Council of Europe Piers Millett, iGEM Foundation, Biosecure & University of Oxford Leigh Turner, University of California, Irvine Chairs: Françoise Baylis, Dalhousie University & Alta Charo, University of Wisconsin-MadisonPresentations included research on current regulatory frameworks and challenges for governance of somatic and heritable editing – if heritable genome editing is deemed safe and acceptable. The session also focused on the governance recommendations from the International Commission on the Clinical Use of Human Germline Genome Editing and the WHO Expert Advisory Committee on Developing Global Standards for Governance and Oversight of Human Genome Editing reports, and how these could be operationalised within nations and internationally.

Online

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Quantum processors: making machines at the atomic-limit

The Bakerian Medal and Lecture 2022 given by Professor Michelle Simmons FRS.

Tuesday 01 March 2022

03/01/2022

03/01/2022

Sixty years ago, the great American physicist Richard Feynman delivered a famous lecture in which he urged experimentalists to push for the creation of new materials with features designed at the atomic limit. He called this the “final question”: whether ultimately “we can arrange the atoms the way we want: the very atoms all the way down!”Professor Simmons will describe how scientists are now finally delivering on Feynman’s dream. She will explain how to manufacture materials and devices whose properties are determined by the placement of individual atoms, and will highlight the creative explosion in new devices that has followed and the many new insights into the quantum world that this revolution has made possible.Watch the event .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } Ask questionsAttending the event This lecture will take place at The Royal Society on 1 March at 6.30pm GMT. This event will be recorded (including the live Q&A) and the recording will be available on YouTube soon after the event and will be streamed live online. The event is free to join. Advance registration is essential due to seating availability. Live subtitles will be available. If after registering you are not able to attend, please cancel your ticket so others can attend. The awardThe Bakerian Medal and Lecture is the premier lecture in physical sciences. The lectureship was established through a bequest by Henry Baker FRS (PDF) of £100 for ‘an oration or discourse on such part of natural history or experimental philosophy, at such time and in such manner as the President and Council of the Society for the time being shall please to order and appoint’. The lecture series began in 1775. The medal is of silver gilt, is awarded annually and is accompanied by a gift of £10,000. Enquiries: contact the Events team.

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Space weather and implications for life on other worlds

Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture 2021 given by Dr Suzanne Imber.

Wednesday 09 February 2022

02/09/2022

02/09/2022

Dr Imber will discuss the role of space weather on planetary dynamics, with particular reference to the Earth and Mercury, extending to Venus, Mars and the giant planets.  In particular Dr Imber will consider how our understanding of space weather has changed over recent years, look forward to some exciting missions being planned for the next few decades, and discuss the extent to which we can apply our current knowledge to the study of the habitability of extra-solar planets. Attending the event This lecture will take place online as a Zoom webinar on 9 February at 6.30pm GMT. This event will be recorded (including the live Q&A) and the recording will be available on YouTube soon after the event. The event is free to join. Advance registration is essential. Live subtitles will be available.The awardThe Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture is made to an individual for an outstanding contribution to any area of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and to support the promotion of women in STEM. The award is supported by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and is named in honour of the biophysicist Rosalind Franklin, who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNA. The first award was made in 2003. The lectureship is accompanied by a medal of silver gilt, a grant of £40,000 and a gift of £1,000. The recipient of the award is expected to spend a proportion of the grant on implementing a project to raise the profile of women in STEM.Enquiries: contact the Events team.

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PAST EVENT

Exhibition

Stormy weather – from lore to science

This exhibition is a partnership between the Royal Society collections and the National Meteorological Library and Archive.

31 January – 30 April 2022

01/31/2022

04/30/2022

Stormy weather – from lore to science, is a partnership between the Royal Society collections and the National Meteorological Library and Archive. The exhibition showcases instruments, books and manuscripts from both collections which tell of the evolution of weather and climate science in Britain.Visiting the exhibition This exhibition is open to visitors until 30 April 2022. Discover the digital stories which relate to this exhibition, as they launch during Summer Science Online.

The Royal Society

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PAST EVENT

Online

You and the planet: Tomorrow’s Earth

Submit your questions for the panel or go to slido.com and enter code #T271.What is your vision for Tomorrow’s Earth? Whether you imagine flying cars, robot companions or materials that think for themselves, we can…

Thursday 27 January 2022

01/27/2022

01/27/2022

Across the world, scientists have developed potential solutions to the crisis, from renewable energy, and sustainable agriculture to biodegradable plastics and net-zero computing but the innovation alone isn’t enough. Climate change is a global challenge that will need scientists, policy makers, individuals, industry and more to come together to take action. So how do we make sure all voices are heard and who will take responsibility to ensure everyone does their part in the fight against climate change and biodiversity loss?SpeakersThis event will be hosted by Justin Rowlatt, Climate Editor at the BBC, who will be joined by: Professor David J Beerling FRS, founder and Director of the Leverhulme Centre for Climate Change Mitigation Dr Miatta Fahnbulleh, Chief Executive of the New Economics Foundation Professor Jim Hall FREng, Professor of Climate and Environmental Risks in the University of Oxford and Director of Research in the School of Geography and the Environment Vanessa Nakate, climate activist from Uganda and founder of the Africa-based Rise Up MovementAttending the event The event will be livestreamed on the Royal Society YouTube channel on 27 January 2022 at 6pm GMT The event is free to join, and there is no registration required Live subtitles will be available For all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org

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PAST EVENT

Online

The Online Information Environment: Professor Melissa Terras in conversation with Dr Vint Cerf ForMemRS

Wednesday 19 January 2022

01/19/2022

01/19/2022

The internet has transformed the way people consume, produce, and disseminate information about the world. This transformation has democratised access to knowledge and driven societal progress. The COVID-19 pandemic exemplifies this, with global researchers collaborating virtually across borders to mitigate harms of the disease and vaccine populations. At the same time, however, it has enabled the low-cost production and proliferation of harmful scientific misinformation. Scientific discussions on issues related to vaccines, 5G, and climate change have all been affected, with some describing the challenge as an ‘infodemic’ and a contributory factor to vaccine hesitancy and physical violence.In this online information environment, how can we ensure that people are provided with the best quality content to guide important decisions? How has the internet changed the way we consume and produce information? How might discussions about scientific topics be affected?The UK’s national academy of science, the Royal Society, explored this question with leading scientists, major technology companies, prominent fact-checkers, and others. The findings and recommendations of this work were published in its report entitled ‘The online information environment: understanding how the internet shapes people’s engagement with scientific information.’This online discussion brought together two members of the report to discuss its findings: Professor Melissa Terras (Professor of Digital Cultural Heritage, University of Edinburgh) and Dr Vint Cerf ForMemRS (Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist, Google). Opening remarks were made by the project’s chair, Professor Frank Kelly FRS (Emeritus Professor of Mathematics of Systems, University of Cambridge). The event outlined the key findings and recommendations of the report and delved into the complex challenges which exist in the online information environment.About the speakers Professor Melissa Terras is the Director of the Centre for Data, Culture & Society, and Professor of Digital Cultural Heritage at the University of Edinburgh. Dr Vint Cerf ForMemRS is Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist at Google and, as the co-designer of the TCP/IP protocols, is widely known as one of the ‘Fathers of the Internet’. Professor Frank Kelly is the Chair of the Royal Society’s Digital Technology and Information project and Emeritus Professor of Mathematics of Systems at the University of Cambridge.

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Nanoengineered seaweed for scarless skin regeneration

The Royal Society Rising Star Africa Prize 2021 given by Dr Nowsheen Goonoo.

Thursday 06 January 2022

01/06/2022

01/06/2022

Type 2 diabetes is a worldwide issue leading to major complications such as diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). The lifetime risk of developing diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is 15% and patients have a 75% mortality rate if DFU is combined with nephropathy. In Africa, approximately 2.4 million diabetics suffer from DFUs. The main common forms of DFU treatment is surgical debridement, dressings and antibiotics therapy. DFUs add significantly to the economic burden of a country due to ulcer management, slow healing which leads to prolonged admissions and surgical interventions. As a result, there is an urgent need to reduce the healing time of DFUs, thereby reducing the number of hospital admissions and amputation rates. Difficulties in repairing wounds related to DFUs are mainly due to wound infection, lack of extracellular matrix (ECM), and insufficient blood supply in the affected area. Current commercial products for the treatment of DFUs are very expensive and find limited applications on the African continent. In her lecture, Dr Goonoo will share her experiences on the transformation of seaweeds into affordable nanofiber-based wound dressings to promote scarless and accelerated wound healing.Attending the event This lecture will take place online as a Zoom webinar on 6 January at 6.30pm GMT. This event will be recorded (including the live Q&A) and the recording will be available on YouTube soon after the event.  The event is free to join. Advance registration is essential. Live subtitles will be available.The awardThe Royal Society Rising Star Africa Prize is to recognise early-career research scientists based in Africa who are making an innovative contribution to the physical, mathematical and engineering sciences. The prize was established in memory of Paul O’Brien FRS and his work encouraging excellence in science and education in Africa. Winners will receive a grant of £14,000 to support their research and a personal gift of £1,000.Enquiries: contact the Events team. 

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PAST EVENT

Online

Voices from the Syrian Academic Community

06 – 10 December 2021

12/06/2021

12/10/2021

Full programme (PDF)Objectives Syrian academics to share their research findings and recommendations with an audience from the academic and humanitarian sectors. Highlight the importance of their unique insights, given local knowledge, expertise and connections. Prompt discussion on issues raises, what needs to be done next and by whom. Prompt new partners and engage funders in follow-up work. Get Syrian higher education and its tertiary educators back on the international agenda.PartnersThis event is supported by The Royal Society and The British Academy.Collaborators: Universities of Edinburgh and Sussex.UN Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDGs) FrameworkEach day is themed, with a number of sub-themes under which over 50 Cara Syria Programme supported studies have been clustered, allied to a number of UNSDGs. Day 1. ‘Reconstructing Syrian Society: The role of higher education.’ Day 2. ‘Inequality & Displacement.’ Day 3. ‘Operationalising Research to Help Rebuild Syria’s Infrastructure .’ Day 4. ‘Syrian Food Futures: Agriculture & food security.’ Day 5. ‘Syria: Partnership for the goal of quality higher education.’Welcome and Keynote speakers Professor Simon Goldhill FBA, British Academy Foreign Secretary Professor Sir Malcolm Grant CBE, Cara President Professor Robin Grimes FRS FREng, incoming Royal Society Foreign Secretary Dr Flavia Schlegel, International Science Council Special Envoy for Science in Global Policy Professor Jim Al-Khalili CBE FRS, theoretical physicist, author and broadcasterSession chairs Day 1. Professor Sir Malcom Grant CBE/Cara President; Professor Elaine Unterhalter FBA/UCL IOE; Professor Christine Chinkin FBA/LSE; Dr Bahriye Kemal/Kent; Dr Maggie Grant/Stirling. Day 2. Professor Dawn Chatty FBA/Oxford; Professor Ann Phoenix FBA/UCL IOE; Professor Tom Shakespeare FBA/LSHTM; Professor Jen Baird/Birbeck; Dr Kristen Hopper/Durham. Day 3. Professor Michael Worton CBE/UCL; Professor Mark Pelling/KCL; Professor Robin Perutz FRS/York; Dr Bahriye Kemal/Kent; Dr Maggie Grant/Stirling. Day 4. Professor Joanna Haigh CBE FRS/Imperial; Professor Lisa Boden/Edinburgh; Professor Colleen McLaughlin/Cambridge. Day 5. Professor Michael Worton CBE/UCL; Professor Colleen McLaughlin/Cambridge; Dr Juliet Millican/IDS & Dr Fateh Shaban/FAU.”This symposium offers a chance to close the gender gap that has always existed. The evening cultural events pave the way to explore the new roles that women have played since the Syrian revolution, as novelists and writers.”Hiba Al HajiEvening cultural events (6pm GMT) 6/12/21 ‘Women Writing Syria: Resilience, Solidarity, Movement’, with readings from Samar Yazbek and other Syrian authors and activists 7/12/21 ‘Syrian Cultural Heritage: Global North/South Collaboration’ 8/12/21 ‘Documenting Syria: Health, Space, Activism’ Q&A with BAFTA award-winning director of ‘For Sama’, Waad al-Kateab 9/12/21 ‘Syrian Humming Project’ Dr Suk-Jun Kim, Korean composer & sound artistView the full programme here (PDF)Attending this event The event will begin on Monday 6 December at 10.00 GMT Once you have booked your free ticket, you will be sent a link by email that will allow you to join the event.

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Fighting diseases with cross-species vaccination

Thursday 02 December 2021

12/02/2021

12/02/2021

The Royal Society Africa Prize 2021 seminar given by Professor George Warimwe.The development and deployment of vaccines against emerging infectious diseases is a priority for global health security. More than 70% of these infectious diseases are zoonotic, meaning they are acquired from animals, with some causing serious illness and death in humans as well as the respective animal host. Despite this, the study of host-pathogen interactions that underlie disease pathogenesis and the mechanisms through which immunity is acquired are often done in medical and veterinary ‘silos’, with little interaction between the two. A ‘one health’ approach that integrates the scientific insights from veterinary and human studies may accelerate progress in the design and development of countermeasures against zoonotic diseases.Rift Valley Fever, a zoonotic disease that causes epidemics in Africa, is among a shortlist of diseases prioritised by the World Health Organization for urgent development of vaccines. In this talk, Professor Warimwe will discuss his ‘one health vaccinology’ approach to developing a single Rift Valley Fever vaccine suitable for human and livestock use.Professor Warimwe’s talk will be followed by a Q&A chaired by Sir Jeremy James Farrar OBE FRS FMedSci.Attending the event This lecture will take place online as a Zoom webinar on 2 December at 6.30pm GMT. This event will be recorded (including the live Q&A) and the recording will be available on YouTube soon after the event.  The event is free to join. Advance registration is essential. Live subtitles will be available.The awardThe Royal Society Africa Prize is to recognise research scientists based in Africa who are making an innovative contribution to the sciences. The medal is of bronze, awarded annually and is accompanied by a gift of £2,000. The prize was previously the Royal Society Pfizer Award which was last awarded in 2016.Enquiries: contact the Events team.

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PAST EVENT

Online

Stories from Science City

Join curators and other experts as they share stories of the people, places, objects and ideas that reveal how science shaped London, and London shaped science.

Wednesday 01 December 2021

12/01/2021

12/01/2021

Science City 1550–1800: The Linbury Gallery explores how London transformed from a modest commercial hub into a powerful metropolis and one of the world’s leading centres of science.  In collaboration with the Science Museum, the Royal Society has assembled a panel of experts for this free virtual event. Science City curator Alexandra Rose will highlight some of the gallery’s key objects, which reveal how the careers of figures such as Isaac Newton, Robert Boyle and Robert Hooke were embedded in London’s commercial life. Keeper of Science Collections Alison Boyle at the Science Museum will be joined by a number of experts to explore some of the stories attached to the objects in the collection.  Join us for a glimpse inside this wonderful gallery and a closer look at an unprecedented age of innovation.  This event is part of our series in partnership with the Science Museum that celebrates Science City 1550 – 1800: The Linbury Gallery.  This event is free to join, but to attend you must book at ticket using the button aboveSpeakers  Alexandra Rose — Curator of Earth Sciences and Curator of Science City 1550–1800: The Linbury Gallery, Science Museum   Dr Alison Boyle — Keeper of Science Collections, Science Museum   Keith Moore — Head of Library and Information Services at The Royal Society  Professor Simon Schaffer — Professor of History of Science, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge UniversityFurther speakers to be announced.Attending the event The event will be broadcast online on Wednesday 1 December at 7pm GMT Once you have booked your free ticket, you will be sent a link by email that will allow you to join the event on one device along with other members of your household Live subtitles will be available

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Online

Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize award ceremony

Monday 29 November 2021

11/29/2021

11/29/2021

Join Professor Brian Cox for a panel discussion with this year’s shortlisted authors, followed by the announcement of the winner of the 2021 Royal Society Science Book Prize, sponsored by Insight Investment.This year’s six shortlisted authors Emily Levesque, James Nestor, Jessica Nordell, Suzanne O’Sullivan, Stuart Ritchie and Merlin Sheldrake, will join Brian to discuss the unifying themes explored within their books and the integral role that science plays in society and our everyday lives.The books championed by the Royal Society Science Book Prize embody compelling science communication and provide an opportunity for readers to engage more deeply with science in an uncertain world. The five-strong judging panel for 2021 is chaired by world-leading immunologist, presenter and writer, Professor Luke O’Neill FRS. He is joined on the panel by representatives from across the worlds of science and culture: television presenter, Ortis Deley; mathematician and Dorothy Hodgkin Royal Society Fellow, Dr Anastasia Kisil; author and creative writing lecturer, Christy Lefteri, and journalist, writer and film maker, Clive Myrie.Attending this event The event will be livestreamed on the Royal Society YouTube channel on 29 November at 6.30pm The event is free to join, and there is no registration required Live subtitles will be available For all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Hubble’s legacy: A journey into the Universe

Wednesday 24 November 2021

11/24/2021

11/24/2021

This event was part of the Royal Society’s post Summer Science series of events. To explore more of the Summer Science on demand programme explore the interactive hub, catch up on the Royal Society’s YouTube channel or visit the Hubble’s legacy  Summer Science content to create a space image, try out the telescope simulator and understand how Hubble has transformed our view of the Universe.Over the past thirty years, the Hubble Space Telescope has provided the research community with an unprecedented access to the workings of the Universe. As a result of the observations made with this telescope, researchers have gathered new data about the age of the Universe, discovered new moons in the Solar System and determined the rate at which the Universe is expanding.In December 2021, a joint venture between NASA, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency will launch the James Webb Space Telescope, a new orbiting telescope that will complement the discoveries of Hubble. Providing researchers with a new infra-red vision of the Universe, the James Webb Space Telescope will enable us to image exoplanets, see through dust into star-nurseries and look back in time to the very first stars and galaxies. Researchers hope that the telescope will provide new information on the formation of the Universe as well as data on how galaxies currently form. Astronaut Jeff Hoffman and a panel of expert speakers delved into Hubble’s legacy and discussed the exciting launch of the James Webb Space Telescope. The event explored what we currently know about the Universe and looked backwards into how it was formed with contributions from experts in astrophysics, astronomy and exoplanetary science. Speakers included: Professor Catherine Heymans, Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Edinburgh and Astronomer Royal for Scotland (Host) Professor James Dunlop FRS, Professor of Extragalactic Astronomy at the University of Edinburgh Professor Jeffrey Hoffman, Hubble astronaut and Professor of the Practice of Aerospace Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Professor Gillian Wright, Director of the UK Astronomy Technology Centre and European Principal Investigator for the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) for James Webb Space Telescope Dr Stephen Wilkins, Head of Astronomy, Director of Outreach and Public Engagement, Reader in Astronomy at the University of Sussex

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PAST EVENT

Online

Celebrating the quatercentenary of the birth of Thomas Willis

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Thursday 18 November 2021

11/18/2021

11/18/2021

Catch up on the full playlist of videos on our YouTube channel.This online conference celebrates the quatercentenary of the birth of Thomas Willis in 1621. It is held on the same day as Willis was elected to Fellowship of the Royal Society in 1663.As a physician in Oxford, Willis’s work in the 1650s provides an example of rural medical practice in early modern England. As a member of the Oxford Philosophical Club that met from the 1640s, he was central to the move from classical scholasticism to accounts of anatomy and physiology based on observation and experiment. As Sedleian Professor of Natural Philosophy in Oxford, the surviving records of his lectures from the 1660s provide an example of pedagogy in medicine at that time. And, after moving to London in 1667, Willis continued to interact with a community of scientists and physicians who transformed ideas on respiration, muscular movement, and the nervous system.Led by four moderators, the twelve speakers will consider the status and developments in natural philosophy in early modern England; the cultural and scientific influences on emerging ideas relating to the vitality of ‘humane bodies’; how this knowledge was set down and communicated through printed books and their illustrations; and the legacy of Willis’s work, and that of some contemporaries, for subsequent developments in medical science. There will be an opportunity for attendees to place questions during the online presentations, for discussion by speakers at the end of each session.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Probabilistic Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence

Wednesday 10 November 2021

11/10/2021

11/10/2021

Royal Society Milner Prize Lecture 2021 given by Professor Zoubin Ghahramani FRS.Modern artificial intelligence (AI) is heavily based on systems that learn from data. Such machine learning systems have led to breakthroughs in the sciences and underlie many modern technologies such as automatic translation, autonomous vehicles, and recommender systems. Probability theory provides a foundation for understanding machine learning and how to build rational decision-making systems. Professor Ghahramani will review the foundations of probabilistic AI and how it relates to deep learning. He will then discuss some topics at the frontier of probabilistic machine learning and some of the societal challenges and opportunities for AI.Attending the event This lecture will take place online as a Zoom webinar on 10 November at 6.30pm GMT. This event will be recorded (including the live Q&A) and the recording will be available on YouTube soon after the event.  The event is free to join. Advance registration is essential. Live subtitles will be available. The awardThe Royal Society Milner Award and Lecture, supported by Microsoft Research, is the premier European award for outstanding achievement in computer science. It is awarded to candidates at the peak of their career who have made a substantial contribution to computer science in Europe, with the strategic aim of supporting European researchers and institutes. The recipient is a European researcher or researcher who has been resident in Europe for 12 months or more, and is chosen by the Council of the Royal Society on the recommendation of the Milner Award Committee. The Committee is made up of Fellows of the Royal Society, Members of the Académie des sciences (France) and Members of Leopoldina (Germany). The award is named in honour of Professor Robin Milner FRS (1934-2010), a pioneer in computer science. The medal is of bronze, is awarded annually and is accompanied by a gift of £5,000. Professor Zoubin Ghahramani FRS  was awarded the Royal Society Milner Award and Lecture in 2021 for his fundamental contributions to probabilistic machine learning.Enquiries: contact the Events team.

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Cop26

Climate change and health at COP26

Climate action to protect and promote health: sharing knowledge among regions to focus on solutions

Wednesday 10 November 2021

11/10/2021

11/10/2021

Climate change poses serious, and potentially catastrophic, threats to human health and natural systems with increasing impacts witnessed on a global scale in recent years. Major efforts are needed both to mitigate and adapt to climate change in the near term without which consequences could increasingly be dangerous. However, if the drivers and impacts of climate change are effectively addressed, there are substantial opportunities for climate action to benefit human health.This event will cover perspectives from Africa, Asia, the Americas and Europe on how climate change affects human health, and the health co-benefits and trade-offs of climate adaptation and mitigation policies.It is jointly organised by the Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf), the InterAcademy Partnership (IAP), and the Academy of Medical Sciences (AMS), together with regional networks in Africa (NASAC), Asia (AASSA), the Americas (IANAS) and Europe (EASAC). More information on the Royal Society’s key work around climate change in the run up to COP26 can be found here, including the recently published report on climate change action and health. SpeakersProfessor Sir Andy Haines FMedSci, Co-Chair of IAP Project on Climate Change and Health London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK Professor Volker ter Meulen, Co-Chair of IAP Project on Climate Change and HealthThe InterAcademy Partnership (IAP)Dr Deoraj Caussy, Working Group Chair of African CCH Working Group (NASAC)Epidemiologist, Mauritius Dr Robin Fears, Biosciences Programme Director European Academies’ Science Advisory Council (EASAC) Professor Sherilee Harper, Associate ProfessorUniversity of Alberta, Canada Professor Ho Kim, Professor of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics Seoul National University, Korea Dr Himla Soodyall, Executive Officer Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf) About COP26COP26 is the 2021 United Nations annual climate change conference. COP stands for Conference of the Parties. Parties are the signatories of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) – a treaty agreed in 1994 which has 197 Parties (196 countries and the EU). The 2021 conference, hosted by the UK, together with our partners Italy, in Glasgow, will be the 26th meeting of the Parties, which is why it’s called COP26.United Nations climate change conferences are among the largest international meetings in the world. The negotiations between governments are complex and involve officials from every country in the world as well as representatives from civil society and the global news media. Attending this event The Blue Zone is for registered COP26 participants only The event will be livestreamed publicly on the UNFCCC COP26 YouTube Channel   

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Cop26

Ask big questions about climate change at COP26

Drop into the Royal Society’s exhibit at Glasgow Science Centre and join live virtual Q&As with some of the leading scientists on the frontline in the battle against climate change and biodiversity loss.

Saturday 06 November 2021

11/06/2021

11/06/2021

Explore how science and technology could help save our planet by answering questions like what is a bee’s favourite flower? How do we mine a sustainable future? And how can we track and trace carbon from space?The Royal Society’s exhibit will be located in the Clyde Suite at Glasgow Science Centre and is part of a larger programme of events and exhibitions in the Green (public) Zone at COP26. See the full programme. Jump to information about attending the event.About Summer ScienceThe research being shown in the Green Zone has previously formed part of the Society’s Summer Science Exhibition, an annual interactive showcase for the public. The exhibition showcases the cutting edge science shaping our future and features 21 exhibits from teams of researchers from across the UK. Enjoy digital highlights from our 2021 Summer Science programme and discover a selection of free online games, fun digital activities and immersive content suitable for all the family, all created by our research groups. About COP26COP26 is the 2021 United Nations annual climate change conference. COP stands for Conference of the Parties. Parties are the signatories of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) – a treaty agreed in 1994 which has 197 Parties (196 countries and the EU). The 2021 conference, hosted by the UK, together with our partners Italy, in Glasgow, will be the 26th meeting of the Parties, which is why it’s called COP26. United Nations climate change conferences are among the largest international meetings in the world. The negotiations between governments are complex and involve officials from every country in the world as well as representatives from civil society and the global news media. Attending this event The Green Zone is free to attend, but a ticket is required Book your ticket by visiting the COP26 Green Zone ticketing website Drop in anytime from 9am – 5pm   Family friendly, all ages welcome 

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PAST EVENT

Cop26

Meet the climate scientists of tomorrow at COP26

Drop into the Royal Society’s exhibit at Glasgow Science Centre and join live Q&As with some of the inspirational young people that are taking action to save our planet through science. 

Friday 05 November 2021

11/05/2021

11/05/2021

With students dialling in virtually from classrooms across the UK, you will find out more about the real-life research projects relating to climate and biodiversity issues that they are undertaking through our Tomorrow’s climate scientists programme.You will also get a chance to discover more about our other opportunities and resources that support teachers and engage students in the important discussions around climate change and biodiversity. The Royal Society’s exhibit will be located in the Clyde Suite at Glasgow Science Centre and is part of a larger programme of events and exhibitions in the Green (public) Zone at COP26. See the full programme. Jump to information about attending the event.About Tomorrow’s climate scientistsTomorrow’s climate scientists aims to give students the opportunity to take action against issues surrounding climate change and biodiversity loss, by empowering them to undertake their own real-life research into these and the possible solutions. The programme is an extension to the Society’s Partnership Grants scheme, which funds schools to run investigate STEM research projects in partnership with a STEM professional from academia or industry.  About COP26COP26 is the 2021 United Nations annual climate change conference. COP stands for Conference of the Parties. Parties are the signatories of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) – a treaty agreed in 1994 which has 197 Parties (196 countries and the EU). The 2021 conference, hosted by the UK, together with our partners Italy, in Glasgow, will be the 26th meeting of the Parties, which is why it’s called COP26. United Nations climate change conferences are among the largest international meetings in the world. The negotiations between governments are complex and involve officials from every country in the world as well as representatives from civil society and the global news media. Attending this event  The Green Zone is free to attend, but a ticket is required Book your ticket by visiting the COP26 Green Zone ticketing website Drop in anytime from 9am – 5pm   Family friendly, all ages welcome 

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PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

Living with COVID-19: When a pandemic becomes endemic

When does a pandemic become endemic? 

Wednesday 03 November 2021

11/03/2021

11/03/2021

It’s been nearly two years since the first recorded COVID-19 case, and we all wonder when the virus will disappear and whether we will finally be able to return to our previous lives. The rapid and successful development of a vaccine, building on years of research and vaccine knowledge, has offered hope to the world. However, according to the World Health Organisation, only two diseases affecting humans and animals have ever been totally eradicated. Experts suggest that while the pandemic will end, COVID-19 will stay with us and become a circulating virus. What does this mean for the new highly transmissible variants appearing? Are vaccines still effective? And how does the virus evolve when faced with our strengthened immune response?Professor Brian Cox and our panel of expert speakers discussed the future of the COVID-19 pandemic as we learn to live with the virus. Explore what we currently know about new COVID-19 variants and look forward into how a fully vaccinated society will learn to live with the virus, with contributions from experts from the fields of epidemiology, history and public health. This event was part of a series of Royal Society events discussing the scientific response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Catch up with previous events on the Royal Society’s YouTube channel.Panel speakers included: Christl Donnelly CBE FMedSci FRS, Professor of Applied Statistics, University of Oxford and Professor of Statistical Epidemiology, Imperial College London Kyle Harper, Professor of Classics and Letters and Provost Emeritus at The University of Oklahoma Marc Lipsitch, Professor of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health Beate Kampmann, Professor of Paediatric Infection & Immunity and Director of the Vaccine Centre, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

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Prize Lecture

Mathematics, Pandemics and Us

Tuesday 26 October 2021

10/26/2021

10/26/2021

Rosalind Franklin Lecture 2020 given by Professor Julia Gog OBE.This year, the topic of pandemics needs no introduction. In this pandemic, the role of mathematical modelling has been a central part of the emergency response. Epidemiological concepts such as the R number and herd immunity are no longer confined to academic discussion, but are now firmly in a wider public understanding of the science. But, what does all this mean for us, as people living through the pandemic?In this talk, Julia Gog discussed some of the COVID-19 research, but also how mathematical ideas can help all of us in understanding what is going on with a pandemic. Models are useful for everyone to build up insights into the inner workings of an epidemic. She argued that models can help all of us make sense of what has happened, and to see what the prospects are for the future with COVID-19. Julia Gog is Professor of Mathematical Biology at the University of Cambridge and the David N. Moore Fellow and Director of Studies in Mathematics at Queens’ College, Cambridge. Julia and her research group in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics specialise in modelling the spread and evolution of infectious diseases, particularly influenza. In 2018, she and her team were behind the UK’s largest citizen science experiment in collaboration with the BBC, using data contributed by users of a smartphone app to understand better how pandemic influenza might spread across the UK. The massive dataset that resulted from the experiment, the largest and most detailed of its kind, has been put into action to assist with model development for the COVID-19 pandemic. Professor Gog has been providing advice to the Government through SPI-M, the specialist pandemic modelling group that feeds into SAGE, the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, as well as through Cambridge’s Centre for Science and Policy (CSaP).Julia is a keen communicator of science and mathematics to public audiences, and as the LMS popular lecturer in 2014. She has teamed up with the Millennium Mathematics Project throughout her time as a Royal Society University Research Fellow (2004-2012) and beyond to work with schools. She has collaborated with Plus magazine during the coronavirus pandemic to share updates on the mathematical modelling approaches to the pandemic. Julia won the London Mathematical Society’s Whitehead prize in 2017. The awardThe Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture is awarded annually and is made to support the promotion of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.Professor Julia Gog was awarded the Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture 2020 for her achievements in the field of mathematics and her impactful project proposal with its potential for a long-term legacy.Enquiries: contact the Events team.

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PAST EVENT

Online

Academic freedom: right or privilege? – Science and Civilisation lecture 2021

Monday 25 October 2021

10/25/2021

10/25/2021

Professor Ignatieff has been at the forefront of issues relating to academic freedom in recent years, having served as President and Rector of the Central European University (CEU) between 2016 and 2021, which saw CEU’s expulsion from Budapest and its re-establishment in Vienna.  He has written and spoken widely on democracy, human rights, governance and the history of Central and Eastern Europe. Professor Ignatieff’s ‘Science and Civilisation’ Lecture will be the eighth in the series, which takes its name from the title of the lecture given by Albert Einstein in October 1933 at the Royal Albert Hall, at a major fundraising event on behalf of Cara and three other organisations who had come together as the ‘Refugee Assistance Fund’ to help those being expelled from Germany by the Nazis. The Science and Civilisation series has brought together a range of leading academics, writers, philosophers and other renowned public figures to discuss important questions relating to academic freedom.

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Poxvirus research after smallpox eradication: new findings with an old vaccine

Thursday 07 October 2021

10/07/2021

10/07/2021

Leeuwenhoek Lecture 2020 given by Professor Geoffrey L. Smith FRS.In 1980 smallpox was declared eradicated after a global vaccination campaign. Today, only two labs in the world retain variola virus, the cause of smallpox, one in the USA and one in Russia – and the World Health Assembly has recommended these virus stocks be destroyed when essential research with variola virus is complete.In this lecture, Professor Geoffrey L. Smith FRS, winner of the 2020 Leeuwenhoek Medal, described how smallpox was eradicated and what happened afterwards. Despite eradication, research with vaccinia virus, the smallpox vaccine, has endured. This research has provided new ways to make vaccines, and revealed how our cells respond to virus infection and how the virus escapes these defenses.  The awardThe Leeuwenhoek Medal and Lecture was originally established to recognise excellence in the field of microbiology but now also includes excellence in bacteriology, virology, mycology and parasitology, and microscopy. The lectureship was named after the Dutch microscopist Antonie van Leeuwenhoek FRS, often referred to as the ‘Father of Microbiology’, and is supported by a bequest from George Gabb. Originally it was held annually, and from 2006 to 2018 it was awarded triennially, but it is now awarded biennially. The lecture was first given in 1950. The medal is of bronze, is awarded biennially and is accompanied by a gift of £2,000.Enquiries: contact the Events team.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Party Conference

Conservative Party Conference: Becoming a “science superpower”: will the UK be fit to tackle the next global crisis?

Tuesday 05 October 2021

10/05/2021

10/05/2021

This event is jointly hosted by the UK National Academies: the Royal Society, the British Academy, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Medical Sciences.The UK government has committed to secure our status as a “Science and Tech Superpower by 2030”. The past year has demonstrated the UK’s potential to realise this, but now UK research and innovation faces its kryptonite: uncertainty. What will the next few years of R&I investment look like? How will the UK take a lead internationally? How can we be ready for the next global crisis?Join us and a panel of research and innovation “superstars” to discuss how the UK should approach the future, build resilience to future crises, and lock-in our superpower status.Panel Tom Whipple, Science Editor at the Times and Sunday Times (Chair) The Rt Hon Greg Clark MP, Chair of the Science and Technology Select Committee Dame Nancy Rothwell DBE DL FRS FMedSci FRSB FBPhS MAE  Professor Susan Gourvenec BEng FIEAust FICE Professor Dominic Abrams FBA FAcSS FBPsS Professor Jennifer LogueThe event is a fringe meeting of the Conservative Party Conference. For more information on the Conference or to sign up, click here.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Party Conference

Conservative Party Conference: Preparing for future challenges: how can Government best use science?

Tuesday 05 October 2021

10/05/2021

10/05/2021

This event is jointly hosted by the Royal Society, Institute for Government and Imperial College London.UK science and scientific advice have played a key role in the response to COVID-19. The pandemic has shone a spotlight on the way government accesses and uses scientific expertise and data, and how this is communicated to the public and open to public debate.Efforts to improve resilience to future challenges will depend on strategic investment in research and innovation and strengthening the role of science in government. This panel will discuss the lessons learnt from COVID-19 on how the UK can use science effectively going forward to achieve its aim to be a “science superpower”.Panel Tom Sasse, IfG Associate Director (Chair) The Rt Hon Greg Clark MP, Chair of the Science and Technology Committee Sir Mark Walport FRS FRCP FRCPath FMedSci FRSE Professor Ian Walmsley FRS, Provost, Imperial College London Polly Toynbee, Columnist at The GuardianThe event is a fringe meeting of the Conservative Party Conference and will take place within the secure zone. For more information on the Conference or to sign up, click here.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Party Conference

Labour Party Conference: Becoming a “science superpower”: will the UK be fit to tackle the next global crisis?

Monday 27 September 2021

09/27/2021

09/27/2021

This event is jointly hosted by the UK National Academies: the Royal Society, the British Academy, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Medical Sciences.The UK government has committed to secure our status as a “Science and Tech Superpower by 2030”. The past year has demonstrated the UK’s potential to realise this, but now UK research and innovation faces its kryptonite: uncertainty. What will the next few years of R&I investment look like? How will the UK take a lead internationally? How can we be ready for the next global crisis? Join us and a panel of research and innovation “superstars” to discuss how the UK should approach the future, build resilience to future crises, and lock-in our superpower status.Panel Anjana Ahuja, Science Journalist at the FT (Chair) Chi Onwurah MP, Shadow Minister for Science, Research and Digital Dr Rupert Lewis, Chief Science Policy Officer at the Royal Society Professor Susan Gourvenec BEng FIEAust FICE Professor Dominic Abrams FBA FAcSS FBPsS Professor Azra Ghani MBE FMedSciThe event is a fringe meeting of the Labour Party Conference. For more information on the Conference or to sign up, click here.

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PAST EVENT

Party Conference

Labour Party Conference: Preparing for future challenges: how can Government best use science?

Monday 27 September 2021

09/27/2021

09/27/2021

This event is jointly hosted by the Royal Society, Institute for Government and Imperial College London. UK science and scientific advice have played a key role in the response to COVID-19. The pandemic has shone a spotlight on the way government accesses and uses scientific expertise and data, and how this is communicated to the public and open to public debate.Efforts to improve resilience to future challenges will depend on strategic investment in research and innovation and strengthening the role of science in government. This panel will discuss the lessons learnt from COVID-19 on how the UK can use science effectively going forward.Panel Tom Sasse, IfG Associate Director (Chair) Chi Onwurah MP, Shadow Minister for Science, Research and Innovation Lord Layard FBA Sir Mark Walport FRS FRCP FRCPath FMedSci FRSE Professor Mary Ryan FREng, Interim Vice-Provost (Research and Enterprise), Imperial College London Ayesha Hazarika MBE, Journalist and Former Labour Party AdviserThe event is a fringe meeting of the Labour Party Conference held within the secure zone. For more information on the Conference or to sign up, click here.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Online

A.C. Grayling: Learning from the Age of Genius

The Age of Genius explores the intertwining of outward event and inner intellectual life to tell the story of the 17th century in Europe. Its author, Professor A.C. Grayling, joins us to discuss that story.  

Wednesday 22 September 2021

09/22/2021

09/22/2021

In collaboration with the Science Museum, the Royal Society presents a very special free virtual event in which the acclaimed philosopher, historian and author Professor A.C. Grayling joins science historian Dr Patricia Fara in conversation.The Age of Genius is a vivid reconstruction of the seventeenth century in which figures that span science, art and philosophy — from Newton, Locke and Hobbes to Shakespeare, Rembrandt and Descartes — took centre stage in sparking a paradigm shift that would define Western thought for centuries to come. Together, Professor Grayling and Dr Fara will discuss The Age of Genius in detail, bringing to life a critical era in human thought.This event is part of our series in partnership with the Science Museum that celebrates Science City 1550 – 1800: The Linbury Gallery.  This event is free to join, but to attend you must book a ticket using the button aboveSpeakers Professor A.C. Grayling CBE MA DPhil (Oxon) FRSA FRSL is the Founder and Principal of New College of the Humanities at Northeastern University, and its Professor of Philosophy. He is also a Supernumerary Fellow of St Anne’s College, Oxford. He is the author of over thirty books of philosophy, biography, history of ideas, and essays. He was for a number of years a columnist on the Guardian, the Times, and Prospect magazine. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, a Vice President of Humanists UK, Patron of the Defence Humanists, Honorary Associate of the Secular Society, and a Patron of Dignity in Dying. Dr Patricia Fara is an Emeritus Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge, where she was formerly Senior Tutor. She was the President of the British Society for the History of Science from 2016–2018, and is the author of numerous books on the history of science including Newton: the Making of Genius, A Lab of One’s Own: Science and Suffrage in the First World War and Science: A Four Thousand Year History. Her most recent book is Life after Gravity: Isaac Newton’s London Career. 

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Party Conference

Liberal Democrat Party Conference: Becoming a “science superpower”: will the UK be fit to tackle the next global crisis?

Friday 17 September 2021

09/17/2021

09/17/2021

This event is jointly hosted by the UK National Academies: the Royal Society, the British Academy, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Medical Sciences.The UK government has committed to secure our status as a “Science and Tech Superpower by 2030”. The past year has demonstrated the UK’s potential to realise this, but now UK research and innovation faces its kryptonite: uncertainty. What will the next few years of R&I investment look like? How will the UK take a lead internationally? How can we be ready for the next global crisis? Join us and a panel of research and innovation “superstars” to discuss how the UK should approach the future, build resilience to future crises, and lock-in our superpower status.Panel Tom Whipple, Science Editor at the Times and Sunday Times (Chair) The Baroness Randerson, Lords Spokesperson for Transport Professor Alison Noble FRS FREng FIET Professor Dominic Abrams FBA FAcSS FBPsS Professor Sir Rory Collins FMedSci FRSThe event is a fringe meeting of the Liberal Democrat Party Conference and only accessible to registered attendees. For more information on the Conference or to sign up, click here.

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PAST EVENT

Online

Has there ever been life on Mars?

This event was part of the Royal Society’s post Summer Science series of events. To explore more of the Summer Science on demand programme explore the interactive hub, catch up on the Royal Society’s YouTube…

Wednesday 15 September 2021

09/15/2021

09/15/2021

From the idea of the Martian Canals in the 1800s to the recent interest in NASA’s Rover Perseverance, humans have long been fascinated by the idea of life on Mars. As our nearest planet and with confirmation that it once had an ‘Earth-like’ climate, Mars has been the focus of many scientific missions.In a bid to better understand the Red Planet, there are currently six missions at Mars and space agencies NASA and ESA are joining forces for a planned sample return. The UK is heavily involved with the joint Russian-European mission ExoMars 2022 and a Fetch rover to bring back rock cores drilled by Mars2020. But were the conditions on Mars ever right for life? Did the ancient lakes, deltas and rivers that have been discovered in the last 20 years once harbour primitive organisms?Our panel of experts explored the evidence that has been gathered from previous missions demonstrating why there may have been life on Mars and how, through continued missions and advanced instruments, researchers hope to answer the most fundamental question of humankind – are we alone in the Universe?Panel speakers included:  Dr Natalie Starkey, Cosmochemist, writer and science communicator (Host) Dr Ashwin Vasavada, MSL Project Scientist, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Dr Suzie Imber, Associate Professor in Space Physics, University of Leicester and winner of the 2021 Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award  Professor Charles Cockell, Professor of Astrobiology, University of Edinburgh and Co-Director of the UK Centre for Astrobiology  Professor John Bridges, Professor of Planetary Science, University of Leicester

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PAST EVENT

Open House

Open House

The Royal Society opens its doors online with an exciting range of digital content over Open House Festival 2021.

04 – 12 September 2021

09/04/2021

09/12/2021

You’ll not only be able to explore the architectural highlights of the homes of the Royal Society, both past and present, but you’ll also be invited to journey with us across London to marvel at the magnificence of other historic buildings designed by the Society and its Fellows. For the Open House Festival only, explore our curated collection of digital resources and take a virtual tour around the building.All Open House content will be available here from 4 – 12 September. Make sure you follow us on Twitter @royalsociety, Instagram @theroyalsociety or Facebook @theroyalsociety for updates and to be notified when content is live. What is Open House?Open House is a simple but powerful concept: hundreds of great buildings of all types and periods open up their doors to all, completely without charge. Open House London looks a little different this year, with many online only and hybrid programmes. For more information about other Open House programming visit the Open House website.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Online

London: Science City 2021

Science City 1550 – 1800: The Linbury Gallery tells the story of how London grew to become a global hub for scientific and technological innovation, but where does it stand in 2021?

Wednesday 25 August 2021

08/25/2021

08/25/2021

In collaboration with the Science Museum, the Royal Society has assembled a panel of experts to examine that question in this free virtual event. Together they will explore how London’s role as a “Science City” has evolved to adapt to a world in which global collaboration is so much more prevalent than in the days of the likes of Newton, Hooke and Wren. The panel will also look to identify some of the challenges and opportunities presented by such seismic issues as Brexit, a green recovery from the pandemic and advances in Artificial Intelligence and engineering.  Speakers Alexandra Rose — Curator of Earth Sciences and Curator of Science City 1550 – 1800: The Linbury Gallery, Science Museum   Dr Hayaatun Sillem CBE— CEO, Royal Academy of Engineering, CEO, Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering Foundation   Professor Sir Mark Walport FRS — Chair, Imperial College Academic Health Science Centre Strategic Partnership Board, Government Chief Scientific Advisor 2013 – 2017, Chief Executive of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) 2017 – 2020   Dr Roger Highfield — Science Director, Science Museum Group Theo Blackwell MBE — Chief Digital Officer, The Mayor of London’s Office Ritula Shah (Chair) — Journalist and news presenter on BBC Radio, and the main presenter of The World Tonight on BBC Radio 4This event is part of our series in partnership with the Science Museum that celebrates Science City 1550 – 1800: The Linbury Gallery.  

Free Event

online pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Engineering ExoMars

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase. 

Sunday 11 July 2021

07/11/2021

07/11/2021

The ExoMars rover is due to launch in 2022 and will travel across Oxia Planum on Mars drilling for signs of life.Join Professor John Bridges of the University of Leicester and colleagues to explore the advanced engineering and UK led science behind this exciting mission, and how researchers hope to prove there was once ancient life on Mars.Speaker Professor John Bridges, Professor of Planetary Science, University of LeicesterAttending this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org 

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Going wild: Why do captive animals need their wild behaviours?

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Sunday 11 July 2021

07/11/2021

07/11/2021

Zoos can provide us with wonderful opportunities to come up close and personal with some fascinating, and often endangered animals. They also act as ‘arks’ preserving the species in their care and helping researchers to understand how best to conserve the same species in the wild.However, zoos need to preserve not just the genetics of the animals they care for, but also their specialised behaviours. Behaviour is one of the main ways in which animals adapt to their surroundings and their physical environment can shape their behaviour as well as altering the development of bones and muscles. But it is difficult for zoos to replicate challenging wild environments in a captive setting, both in terms of safety and practicality.Enter Dr Jackie Chappell, who in partnership with Drayton Manor Zoo, is developing a handy tool that will help them to evaluate the behaviours of their animals and alter their enclosures to create more ‘wild-type’ environments. Discover how this can lead to improved animal welfare and conservation and find out how this encourages animals to express more of their natural behaviours like they would in the wild.Speaker Dr Jackie Chappell, Reader in Animal Behaviour, University of BirminghamWatching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Weirdology

This event is part of the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Sunday 11 July 2021

07/11/2021

07/11/2021

Explore the strange chemistry, materials science, physics and biology lurking in everyday things… this is a show for people who think they hate science.Join Gastronaut Stefan Gates and his long-suffering daughter Poppy for an unforgettable adventure through strange and wonderful chemistry, biology and physics as they tackle questions such as Why can’t you melt a Flake? What are bogies for? Can you make screaming hot plasma in a microwave?Full of ridiculous and shocking demos, hacks, myth busting and self-experimentation, this is an action-packed family science show that will light the touchpaper of fascination in anyone.  BBC Gastronaut Stefan Gates is renowned for his world-class science and food shows.  This event is suitable for ages 5+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

BO and beyond

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Sunday 11 July 2021

07/11/2021

07/11/2021

Everybody can recognise the unmistakable aroma of body odour, but did you know that it is caused by bacteria living in our armpits? These bacteria break down molecules in sweat, causing the smelly by-product we know.Hear from Dr Julia Humes and the team of researchers who are looking at how and why the bacteria do this, and how this knowledge might help us develop better deodorants.Speaker Dr Julia Humes, Research Associate, University of Oxford Watching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org 

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Extinction: Evolution’s Partner in Crime?

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Saturday 10 July 2021

07/10/2021

07/10/2021

The mass-extinction of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, along with multiple other life forms, ended the 165-million-year reign of these magnificent prehistoric creatures and now icons of extinction.   Join Professor Phillip Manning to explore if extinction plays a critical role in the ebb and flow of life and whether we should view this spectre of doom as evolutions partner in crime, allowing new life forms to develop and emerge from its shadow.Speakers Professor Phillip Manning FGS FRGS, Professor of Natural History, University of ManchesterWatching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+  Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience  For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Would you trust a robot surgeon?

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Saturday 10 July 2021

07/10/2021

07/10/2021

Robots in surgery offer so much more than the ability to mirror a surgeon’s hand movements, but there are many legal, ethical and technical challenges to overcome before they replace surgeons.Join Dr George Mylonas to discover the ways that researchers are developing the safe use of robots in surgery, and how they are working to avoid ethical dilemmas by keeping them under the total control of the surgeon at all times. Speaker Dr George Mylonas, Lecturer in Robotics and Technology in Cancer, Imperial College London Watching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org 

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Monte-Carlo simulation and The Pirates of the Caribbean

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Saturday 10 July 2021

07/10/2021

07/10/2021

Have you ever wanted to determine the chances of a snow day in winter or the probability of an opponent’s next move in a gripping game of chess?There are some calculations too complicated for even established mathematicians to solve. In these cases, scientists and mathematicians turn to a simple but powerful technique called the Monte-Carlo Simulation, a method first invented by scientists working on the atomic bomb in the 1940s.So, what exactly is Monte-Carlo Simulation? And how does this simple yet refined concept help to resolve such complex problems?Join mathematician Dr Nira Chamberlain as he enlists the help of Captain Jack Sparrow to explain the mathematical modelling of the Pirates of the Caribbean and how this creative solution can be applied to the real world.Speaker Dr Nira Chamberlain CMath CSci FIMA FORS, President, Institute of Mathematics and its ApplicationsWatching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Maddie and Greg take over Summer Science

This event is part of the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Saturday 10 July 2021

07/10/2021

07/10/2021

Join YouTubers and TV presenters Maddie Moate and Greg Foot for a special Summer Science live show.  In this exclusive takeover, Maddie and Greg will be bringing us some of their favourite try-at-home science experiments from their hugely popular online family science show “Let’s Go Live”.  Get ready to discover how to create gooey chocolate mug cakes, perform a step-by-step flower dissection and craft a solar system that could fit right in your pocket.  Watching this event online Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Mining for a sustainable future

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Saturday 10 July 2021

07/10/2021

07/10/2021

Modern life would be unrecognisable without the rare minerals and metals mined from the Earth. From mobile phones to electric cars, we rely on unusual elements such as cobalt in our devices, and they play a significant role in the green technologies the world needs to adopt.But how can these ‘Energy Critical Elements’ be part of the sustainable world they will power? Hear from researchers from iCRAG and the Natural History Museum as they explore how we can find these minerals and metals, and how we can produce them sustainably.    Speakers Researchers from iCRAG and NHM Watching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+  Part of Summer Science 2021  Share on social media using #SummerScience  For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org 

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Weekend workshops

10 – 11 July 2021

07/10/2021

07/11/2021

Our range of free weekend workshops with our 2021 researchers are now fully booked. We are currently operating a waiting list so please click on the links below to register your place and you will be notified if a ticket becomes available.    Family workshops – suitable for 7+ Saturday 10 July Sunday 11 July Working with dinosaurs (sold out) 10am – 11am Make your own bee hotel (sold out) 10am – 11am Flowing words (sold out) 1pm – 2pm Exploring the Universe’s rainbow and beyond (sold out) 1pm – 2pm Minecrafting a sustainable future (sold out)  2pm – 3pm Carbon in your garden (sold out) 2pm – 2.45pm Cardboard tumours (sold out) 3pm – 4pm Mars detectives (sold out) 2pm – 3pm Create your own universe (sold out) 4pm – 4.45pm Build your own metal detector (sold out) 3pm – 4.30pm Why are humans smelly? (sold out) 3pm – 3.45pm How do birds fly? (sold out) 4pm – 4.45pm Adult workshops – suitable for 14+ Saturday 10 July Sunday 11 July Breaking into tumours (sold out) 10am – 11am How can nature inspire engineering? (sold out)  10am – 10.45am Create your own universe (sold out) 1pm – 1.45pm Stitch ‘n’ stem (sold out) 4pm – 5pm Impacts, volcanoes and mass-extinction (sold out) 2pm – 3pm Help us breathe fresh air again: the virtual escape room (sold out)  3pm – 4pm Attending these workshops online: These events are free to join Registration is required, book using the Eventbrite links provided The event will be run on Zoom  Zoom details will be sent out at least 24 hours in advance Tickets for the workshops are extremely limited. If you can no longer attend, please cancel your booking so we can offer the place to the waiting list If you have any accessibility requirements, please get in touch with us at least a week before the event Part of Summer Science 2021  Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.orgThese are free events hosted by the Royal Society and do not require credit card or bank details. Please ensure that you only follow official Royal Society links (www.royalsociety.org) Numbers for the workshops are limited, therefore in order to ensure as many as possible can take part in these interactions with the researchers, please only book one workshop. For family workshops, parental supervision is required for those attending with younger participants.  

astronomyandphysics astronomyandphysics astronomyandphysics chemistry chemistry chemistry microbiologyimmunologyanddevelopmentalbiology earthandenvironmentalsciences earthandenvironmentalsciences earthandenvironmentalsciences organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology healthandhumansciences summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

In and under the skin

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Friday 09 July 2021

07/09/2021

07/09/2021

In a special double feature, meet two researchers working at the cusp of stem cell research. Making stem cells move Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disease that affects the nervous system, resulting in damage and degradation to the nerve and brain cells which causes loss of muscle control.  Meet Peter Harley, who is developing a method to grow nerves and muscles that function together in the lab as they would in the body to try to find new treatments for this condition.  Stem cells and wound healing All of us will get a scar during our lifetime, but how do they form?  Dr Christina Philippeos will talk all about how stem cells are involved in the crucial process of wound healing, and whether there are ways to use them to treat scarring. Speakers Peter Harley, King’s College London  Dr Christina Philippeos, King’s College LondonWatching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+  Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience  For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org 

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Detecting landmines for a safer world

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Friday 09 July 2021

07/09/2021

07/09/2021

An estimated 60 million people worldwide still live with the daily risk of unexploded landmines and bombs.  Join Professor Tony Peyton to discover how research and new technologies are helping to improve the speed and accuracy of landmine clearance.Speaker Professor Tony Peyton, Professor of Electromagnetic Tomography, University of Manchester Watching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+  Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience  For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org 

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Inspiring intergenerational connections post COVID-19

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Friday 09 July 2021

07/09/2021

07/09/2021

There are often stark differences in the way different generations experience the world around them but have you ever wondered how connecting old people and young people could be mutually beneficial?When different generations share time and space together, the unexpected can happen. Intergenerational connections are a sustaining force of support and motivation and have been proven to reduce isolation, heighten wellbeing and challenge ageist perceptions. However, these bonds have been challenged by the recent COVID-19 pandemic. In its wake, poor mental health and loneliness have been two of the devastating consequences. Could building and rediscovering bonds between different generations help? COVID-19 has triggered new ways of thinking so how can we establish different and more sustainable intergenerational connections? To answer some of these questions, Dr Melrose Stewart joins us to explain the benefits that can occur when we close the generational gap and uncovers inspirational ways we can all learn to stay connected. Speaker Dr Melrose Stewart MBE, Honorary Lecturer, University of BirminghamWatching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

What happens when there’s too much water?

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Friday 09 July 2021

07/09/2021

07/09/2021

Flooding events happen across the world every year and unpredictable weather is becoming increasingly more frequent as a result of climate change.Join Professor Hannah Cloke as she explores why floods happen and how the latest advances in weather prediction and forecasting can give us valuable insight into the locations most at risk from adverse weather. She’ll answer what happens when there is too much water as well as examining the effect that climate change is having on all of us. Speaker Professor Hannah Cloke OBE, Professor of Hydrology, University of Reading Watching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+  Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience  For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org 

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Stories from the frontier of Earth observation

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Friday 09 July 2021

07/09/2021

07/09/2021

Tracking and tracing the sources, sinks and stores of carbon on Earth is crucial in our ongoing fight against climate change. Being able to do this is challenging but with more data from satellites all across the globe, we are now able to do this with increasing accuracy and ease.  Join Paul Palmer, Mat Disney and Gemma Kulk as they take you on a journey through the land, air and sea to explore how satellites are used at the cutting edge of climate science. Speakers: Professor Mat Disney, Professor of Remote Sensing, University College London Dr Gemma Kulk, Researcher, Plymouth Marine Laboratory Professor Paul Palmer, Professor of Quantitative Earth Observation, University of EdinburghWatching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience  For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org 

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Mapping tumours

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Thursday 08 July 2021

07/08/2021

07/08/2021

Tumours are not just solid lumps but are made up of many different cell types and components.Join researcher Dr Joanna Kelly to find out more about these ‘tumour landscapes’ and why understanding the details of their composition could be the key to developing the cancer treatments of the future.  Speaker Dr Joanna Kelly, Postdoctoral Researcher, CRUK Manchester Watching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+  Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience  For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org 

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Ancestors with Professor Alice Roberts

Join author, academic and broadcaster Professor Alice Roberts as she journeys through time to uncover the lost stories of our prehistoric ancestors – written in stone, pottery, metal and bone.

Thursday 08 July 2021

07/08/2021

07/08/2021

Burials are like time capsules – each one, a physical biography, written into the skeleton. Objects placed into graves provide us with some of our clearest evidence of ancient cultures – and the science of genomics is now revolutionising our perception of the deep past. From the colonisation of the globe in the Palaeolithic to the prehistory of Britain, Alice reflects on what archaeological discoveries tell us about our ancestors and the human experience that binds us all together. Professor Alice Roberts was the first recipient of the Royal Society’s David Attenborough award for Public Engagement in 2020. An anatomist and biological anthropologist, Alice made her television debut in the UK in 2001 and since then has written and presented a number of popular TV programmes and series. Alice has been the Professor of Public Engagement at the University of Birmingham since 2012. She has also written eleven books ranging across anatomy, evolutionary anthropology and archaeology.Watching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Eagle inspired engineering

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Thursday 08 July 2021

07/08/2021

07/08/2021

From producing lift with their tails to allowing their wings to be buffeted by the wind to provide suspension, birds have adapted incredible ways of remaining stable during flying. Now scientists such as Professor Jim Usherwood are using tiny helium-filled soap bubbles to track how birds such as owls, hawks and eagles make gliding seem so effortless. By studying nature in this way, it may be possible to inspire the next generation of human-made aircrafts and flying machines.Speaker: Professor Jim Usherwood, Professor of Locomotor Biomechanics, Royal Veterinary CollegeWatching this event online:  This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience  For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org 

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

The life and death of galaxies

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Thursday 08 July 2021

07/08/2021

07/08/2021

When two hearts collide, they beat as one. When two galaxies collide, the result is very different. Hear from Dr Annagrazia Puglisi who has been observing this very event, known as a galaxy merger. Discover how and why galaxy mergers play a role in the number of stars that form, or don’t, within a galaxy and how this may lead to the death of both galaxies.Speaker: Dr Annagrazia Puglisi, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Durham  Attending this event online:  This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021  Share on social media using #SummerScience  For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org 

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

What a waste

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase. 

Thursday 08 July 2021

07/08/2021

07/08/2021

One person’s trash is another person’s treasure. And never was this old cliché more apt than when talking about the process of creating biogas energy from organic waste.Meet Professor James Chong and Dr Caroline Orr, as well as the microbes that are crucial to this process called anaerobic digestion. Discover why a greater understanding of these microbes can help us to maximise the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, and, in turn, produce a clean and renewable energy source.Speakers Professor James Chong, Royal Society Industry Fellow, University of York Dr Caroline Orr, Principal Lecturer, Teesside UniversityWatching this event online:  This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience  For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org 

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

The rapidly changing world of neural interfaces

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Thursday 08 July 2021

07/08/2021

07/08/2021

As global technology advances at a rapid rate, the race is on to develop new and commercially available neural, or brain-computer, interfaces. Allowing direct communication between a brain and an external device, companies such as Neuralink, Kernel and NIRX have all thrown their hats into the ring.From devices that can read thoughts for hands free typing and computer control to interfaces that can evaluate emotions, these developments could have a huge impact on how we interact with technology and also each other. Dr Adrien Rapeaux explores the current landscape by looking at recent advances in these technologies as well as the potential impact they could have on our future.Speaker Dr Adrien Rapeaux, Research Associate, Imperial College London Watching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience  For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Beauty quarks behaving badly

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Thursday 08 July 2021

07/08/2021

07/08/2021

It’s no secret that the universe is a vast space, made up of various fundamental particles, all of which help us to understand what the universe is, how it works and how it can change over time. The Standard Model, a highly reliable, well-tested description of fundamental particles and their interactions, predicts that particles known as beauty quarks should decay in the final states involving either muons or electrons at equal rates.  However, new research suggests this may not be happening and the reason why remains a mystery. Leading physicist, Dr Mitesh Patel joins us to explain the puzzling behaviour of the beauty quark and how these findings could point to the existence of new particles and forces of nature not yet known to science.Speaker Dr Mitesh Patel, Reader in Particle Physics, Imperial College LondonWatching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Air pollution: can you catch a gas?

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Thursday 08 July 2021

07/08/2021

07/08/2021

Is it possible to catch a gas? And how can you remove gaseous pollutants from the air?  Join Professor Martin Schröder to find out how researchers at the University of Manchester are using chemistry and new materials design to tackle air pollution. Speakers Professor Martin Schröder FRSE FRSC, Vice President and Dean, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Professor of Chemistry, University of ManchesterWatching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

How has Hubble transformed our view of the distant Universe?

This event is part of a series of lightning lectures for the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Thursday 08 July 2021

07/08/2021

07/08/2021

As we look out into the Universe, we see it as it appeared in the past, making telescopes like Hubble effectively time machines. Through iconic images, like Hubble’s Ultra Deep Field, astronomers have now observed galaxies across much of the Universe’s history transforming our understanding of its evolution. Join Dr Stephen Wilkins on an interstellar journey through time and space as he explores some of the ground-breaking discoveries made possible by the Hubble Telescope.   Speakers Dr Stephen Wilkins, Head of Astronomy, University of SussexWatching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ This event is free to join and there is no registration required Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

History of Science’s Summer Science Showcase

Taking mother nature as our inspiration for Summer Science this year, join us straight from the Royal Society’s archives as we journey through the microscopic discoveries of both sea and land to the giants of the…

08 July – 31 August 2021

07/08/2021

08/31/2021

Peer inside the pages of the first photo book in history capturing the blue depths of algae (made by a female botanist and photographer), explore the unexpected science of the great Victorian artist and critic John Ruskin through our Google Arts & Culture Exhibition, and discover the glamorous history of the Summer Science Exhibition itself whilst having a go at capturing images of science yourself with our live Doodle of the Day.  Suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Summer Science on demand

08 July – 31 August 2021

07/08/2021

08/31/2021

Summer Science returns for 2021 with a digital showcase of cutting-edge UK science. With a packed programme of inspiring talks, fascinating interactive workshops, fun science from home activities and exciting digital content, there is something for all ages.Has there ever been life on Mars? Would you trust a robot surgeon? What’s a bee’s favourite flower?Join us on the 8 – 11 July to explore the research that is shaping our future and discover the people looking to answer some of life’s big questions.Sign up to our public newsletter to be the first to find out the latest news about this year’s programme or follow us on Twitter @royalsociety or Facebook @theroyalsociety.For general enquiries, please contact exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

How to print your ‘wonder pill’?

This event is part of our Summer Science 2021 launch on Wednesday 7 July. A special evening featuring the return of our family friendly Big Summer Science quiz and lightning lecture sessions with some of our…

Wednesday 07 July 2021

07/07/2021

07/07/2021

In medicine, 3D printing has already been used to create prosthetic limbs, implants and other devices. But could this technology be used to print personalised pills?Join Dr Laura Ruiz Cantu and Dr Yinfeng He as they administer an exciting dose of the future of medication. Explore the work that they are doing to print a so-called “wonder pill” that can deliver multiple medications to the body, at the correct dose and time.Speakers Dr Laura Ruiz Cantu, Transitional Assistant Professor, University of Nottingham and Dr Yinfeng He, Transitional Assistant Professor, University of NottinghamWatching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Big Summer Science quiz

This event is part of the Royal Society’s 2021 Summer Science digital showcase.

Wednesday 07 July 2021

07/07/2021

07/07/2021

Our big, family-friendly online quiz returns for its second year. Get your team together and go for quiz glory, as comedian and science presenter Helen Arney is joined by special guests and Fellows of the Royal Society including Brian Cox and Martyn Poliakoff. The quiz will also include children’s author Izzi Howell, doctor and television presenter Kevin Fong and Francis Crick Institute scientist and Great British Bake-Off contestant Yan Tsou for quiz rounds on their favourite topics. The Society’s very own Head Librarian, Keith Moore will also join the quiz to bring you a selection of treasures from the Royal Society archives. Watching this event online This event is suitable for ages 7+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

What is a bee’s favourite flower, and why should we care?

This event is part of our Summer Science 2021 launch on Wednesday 7 July. A special evening featuring the return of our family friendly Big Summer Science quiz and lightning lecture sessions with some of our…

Wednesday 07 July 2021

07/07/2021

07/07/2021

Calling all bee saviours, our pollinators are in danger. Factors such as loss of natural habitat and climate change have dramatically decreased our bee population over recent years and the knock-on effects could be huge to both the UK’s food production and local ecosystems.  Join researchers from across the country as they explore this seemingly innocuous question, which might well save our wildlife and our food.  Speakers  Dr Peter Bickerton, Earlham Institute Dr Richard Leggett, Earlham Institute Dr Lynn Dicks, University of Cambridge Elie Kent, University of East Anglia Dr Will Nash, Earlham Institute Dr Darren Heavens, Earlham Institute Dr Calum Raine, Earlham Institute Dan Harris, Bee Saviour Behaviour John Everett, Applebee Orchard and ApiaryWatching this event online This event is suitable for ages 14+ Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience  For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

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Summer Science Exhibition

Summer Science launch evening

Our Summer Science 2021 will be launching this July with a special evening on Wednesday 7 July featuring the return of our family friendly Big Summer Science quiz and lightning lecture sessions with some of our…

Wednesday 07 July 2021

07/07/2021

07/07/2021

Explore what a bees favourite flower is, or take a look at the future of medication as our researchers show you how they are using 3D printing to revolutionise the manufacturing of medicine. You can also take part in our family quiz night, hosted by writer, science presenter and geek songstress Helen Arney from 6.30pm BST. She’ll be joined by a range of special guests to bring you their favourite science questions direct to your screen. Find out more about each of the events below.Attending these events online: These events will be livestreamed from 6pm BST on the Royal Society YouTube channel These events will also be available afterwards on our YouTube channel  The events are free to join and there is no registration required  Live subtitles will be available  Part of Summer Science 2021 Share on social media using #SummerScience  For all enquiries contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

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Online

The role of African scientists in feeding the continent

Royal Society Africa Prize Lecture 2020 with Dr Steven Runo

Monday 05 July 2021

07/05/2021

07/05/2021

A large number of Africans live in rural households and are dependent on small farms for food and other essential needs. Most of these farms (80%) are less than 2ha in size and therefore any further constraints, such as pests and diseases that reduce yields have immediate and far-reaching impact on the wellbeing of resource poor farmers. This situation is made worse by the well documented effects of climate change – such as prolonged drought, floods and increase in pest infestation. It is therefore no surprise that whereas in most other parts of the world hunger and malnutrition has been on the decline, in Africa it has been on the rise exposing millions to starvation and undernourishment.Alleviating hunger from Africa will require concerted efforts that greatly harness science, technology, and innovation. However, despite great technological advancement in science technology and innovation elsewhere, most of sub-Saharan Africa still lags behind. Therefore, to fully harness science, technology and innovation, strategic alliances that leverage scientific advancement in other African countries and beyond are critical. Such alliances will expand our capacity to translate upstream science into applications that appropriately meet the needs of small holder farmers. Gradually, this will build capacity in a critical number of African scientists that can then develop homegrown innovations to improve food production.In this lecture, Dr Runo shared his experiences on the gains his group have made towards managing one of the most noxious parasites of African agriculture – the parasitic weed Striga – as well as his vision for a food secure Africa bolstered by scientific innovations. Attending this eventThis event has taken place.The awardThe Royal Society Africa Prize is to recognise research scientists based in Africa who are making an innovative contribution to the sciences. Winners will receive a grant of £15,000 to support their research. The medal is of bronze, awarded annually and is accompanied by a gift of £2,000.The Royal Society Africa Prize 2020 is awarded to Dr Steven Runo for elucidating pathways for long distance RNA trafficking between parasitic plants and their hosts and identifying and developing transgenic protocol for characterizing and validating candidate host and parasite genes.For all enquiries, please contact the Events team.

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Transforming Our Future

Sustainable packaging: protecting products and the planet

This Royal Society symposium brought together stakeholders from the packaging industry to highlight new approaches to replace, reuse, or remove plastic from packaging and discussed how green materials aren’t so…

Friday 02 July 2021

07/02/2021

07/02/2021

BackgroundPackaging has transformed the manner and extent to which we can safely transport and store goods, but our current system is failing. Studies suggest that only 14% of plastic packaging used globally is collected for recycling and only 10% of all plastic recycled has been so more than once. Around 40% currently ends its useful life in landfill. Tackling waste and establishing a circular plastics economy will play a vital role in making the packaging industry sustainable.From designing effective and affordable materials to mining discarded plastic, this event will showcase global disruptors and policymakers who are working to reduce, reuse or revolutionise plastic at every level of the packaging life cycle.About the conference seriesThis scientific meeting is part of the Royal Society’s Transforming our Future conference series generously supported by AstraZeneca. These meetings are unique, high-level events that address the scientific and technical challenges of the next decade. Each conference features cutting edge science from industry and academia and brings together leading experts from the scientific community, including regulatory, charity and funding bodies.

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Everything in motion: How our brains learn to control our bodies

Ferrier Lecture 2021 given by Professor Daniel Wolpert FMedSci FRS

Thursday 17 June 2021

06/17/2021

06/17/2021

The effortless ease with which we move our arms, our eyes, even our lips when we speak masks the true complexity of the control processes involved. This is evident when we try to build machines to perform human control tasks.  What sets us apart is our ability to learn new motor skills. Daniel Wolpert’s group has studied the computations involved in human motor learning and described the incredible computations our brains perform that allow us to acquire our extensive motor repertoire. Attending this eventThis event has taken place. The recording of the lecture will be available soon.  The awardThe Ferrier Medal and Lecture is for distinguished contributions on the structure and function of the nervous system. The medal is of bronze gilt and is accompanied by a gift of £2,000.The Ferrier Medal and Lecture 2021 is awarded to Professor Daniel Wolpert FMedSci FRS for groundbreaking contributions to our understanding of how the brain controls movement. Using theoretical and experimental approaches he has elucidated the computational principles underlying skilled motor behaviour.For all enquiries, please contact the Events team

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The Art of Data

Fact-based data are powerful tools to combat fake news and misinformation. But how many of us really understand the significance of voter polls, probability or the COVID dashboard? 

Sunday 13 June 2021

06/13/2021

06/13/2021

Professor David Spiegelhalter is the 2020 winner of the Royal Society’s Michael Faraday Prize for his work in making statistics and probability entertaining and accessible to key decision-makers and the public. He is joined by data artist  Stefanie Posavec who  finds playful and friendly ways to communicate data visually. Together they will explain how an understanding of numbers can help us make informed decisions about our lives.This is a partner event hosted as part of the Cheltenham Science Festival.Speakers Professor Sir David Spiegelhalter, Chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication in the Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge Stefanie Posavec, Designer, data artist and authorAttending the event The event will be live streamed on the Cheltenham Science Festival YouTube channel on Sunday 13 June at 9.15pm BST Full joining instructions can be found on the Cheltenham Science Festival website For any enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

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Gaia Vince, Jim Al-Khalili and Camilla Pang in conversation at Hay Festival

Understanding ourselves and the world around us are arguably the biggest tasks of being human. Science writers can demystify who we are, where we have come from, and where we might be heading.

Saturday 05 June 2021

06/05/2021

06/05/2021

Join three extraordinary authors shortlisted for the 2020 Royal Society Science Book Prize, sponsored by Insight Investment, in conversation with Rachael Garside: Gaia Vince, Transcendence: How Humans Evolved through Fire, Language, Beauty, and Time Jim Al-Khalili, The World According to Physics Camilla Pang, Explaining Humans: What Science Can Teach Us about Life, Love and Relationships (winner).Royal Society Science Book Prize, sponsored by Insight Investment:For more than three decades the Royal Society has been celebrating outstanding popular science writing and authors. The Royal Society Science Book Prize, sponsored by Insight Investment, is awarded annually by a panel of expert judges, comprising of eminent scientists, authors, journalists and broadcasters. From hundreds of entries only six books, which make popular science writing compelling and accessible to the public, are shortlisted.Previous winners of the prize include Stephen Hawking (2002), Bill Bryson (2004), Cordelia Fine (2017), Mark Miodownik (2014), Caroline Criado Perez (2019) and most recently, Camilla Pang (2020).The 2021 shortlist will be announced later this summer.Attending this event Register for a free ticket on the Hay Festival webpage. Scroll down to event 124 and select ‘register for this event’ All enquiries to Hay Festival

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Prize Lecture

Brain mechanisms of addictive behaviour

The Croonian Lecture 2021 delivered by Professor Barry Everitt FMedSci FRS.

Thursday 27 May 2021

05/27/2021

05/27/2021

The use and abuse of psychoactive substances, including cocaine, heroin, alcohol, cannabis and tobacco (nicotine) have been an enduring feature of human societies. In the UK alone, ‘the total cost to society of illegal drugs is around £20 billion per year, but only £600 million is spent on treatment and prevention’.There are now many studies of addiction in human populations, including sophisticated imaging studies that have provided rich information about the structure, metabolic activity and neurochemical status of the brains of individuals with a drug addiction. However, such investigations do not easily allow us to understand the progression from initial, recreational use of addictive drugs through abuse to the addicted state when behaviour directed at obtaining and using drugs becomes compulsive.This lecture reviewed some of Professor Everitt and his group’s research on the behavioural neuroscience of addiction in experimental animals that seeks to understand the neural and psychological mechanisms of addictive behaviour, including the nature of vulnerability as well as the possibility of developing new treatments.Attending this eventThis event has taken place. The AwardThe Croonian Medal and Lecture has been awarded since 1738 and is the premier lecture in the biological sciences. Professor Barry Everitt FMedSci FRS will be awarded the Croonian Medal and Lecture 2021 for elucidating brain mechanisms of motivation and applying them to important societal issues such as drug addiction.Enquiries: contact the Events team

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What is (Quantum) Life?

In this ‘in-conversation’ style event, Professor Jim Al-Khalili speaks to geneticist, author, and BBC presenter Dr Adam Rutherford, about his work into the origins of quantum biology as a 21st century science and…

Thursday 20 May 2021

05/20/2021

05/20/2021

Attending this event The event will be livestreamed on the Royal Society YouTube channel on Thursday 20 May at 6pm BST This event is free to join and there is no registration required Live subtitles will be available For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

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Vaccines: a double dose

Join Professor Brian Cox and our panel of experts as they revisit the landscape of vaccines and what matters now as the world continues to face COVID-19.

Thursday 06 May 2021

05/06/2021

05/06/2021

 Crossing international boundaries, this event takes a global perspective to the roll-out of the vaccine programme, looking at issues of equitable access and the challenges that we face, the effectiveness of the vaccine against mutations and new variants, and how vaccinations will affect any possible future waves.This event is part of a series of Royal Society events discussing the scientific response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Catch up with the rest of the series on the Royal Society’s YouTube channel. SpeakersThe event will be hosted by Professor Brian Cox, the Royal Society’s Professor for Public Engagement in Science, who will be joined by:  Professor Salim Abdool Karim, Director of Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) Dr Katrina Lythgoe, Sir Henry Dale Fellow at the Big Data Institute, University of Oxford Professor Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer for England and the UK government’s Chief Medical Adviser Professor Wendy Barclay, Action Medical Research Chair of Virology, Imperial College LondonAttending the event The event will be livestreamed on the Royal Society YouTube channel on Thursday 6 May at 6pm BST This event is free to join and there is no registration required Live subtitles will be available For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

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You and the planet: oceans

There are plenty of fish in the sea, or so the saying goes. But for how much longer? With increasing overfishing, growing amounts of pollution and global temperatures rising, our ocean and its ecosystems are under…

Thursday 29 April 2021

04/29/2021

04/29/2021

We heard from National Geographic Explorers and other experts at the helm of the fight to save our seas. And, as we enter the UN Decade of Ocean Science, we explored how science and technology can help us to turn the tide and take us towards living sustainably and in harmony with the ocean.  The event was hosted by wildlife biologist and presenter, Lizzie Daly, who was joined by: Diva Amon, Deep-sea biologist, 2020 National Geographic Emerging Explorer and Director of SpeSeas Jahawi Bertolli, 2019 National Geographic Explorer, CBBC Planet Defender, professional underwater and wildlife film maker and photographer Angela Hatton, Director of Science and Technology at the National Oceanography Centre Richard Thompson, Professor of Marine Biology and Director of the Marine Institute at the University of Plymouth

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Fast Radio Bursts

Bakerian Lecture 2021 delivered by Professor Victoria Kaspi CC FRS

Tuesday 27 April 2021

04/27/2021

04/27/2021

Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are short (few millisecond) bursts of radio waves observed from cosmological distances. Their origin is presently unknown, yet their rate is many hundreds per sky per day, indicating a not-uncommon phenomenon in the Universe. In this talk, Professor Kaspi reviewed the FRB field and presented new results on FRBs from a new digital transit radio telescope, the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME).Attending this eventThis event has taken place. The awardThe Bakerian Lecture series began in 1775 and is the premier lecture in physical sciences.Professor Victoria Kaspi CC FRS was awarded the Bakerian Medal and Lecture 2021 for her research focused on neutron stars and their utility for constraining basic physics. More recently, she has also made fundamental discoveries on Fast Radio Bursts.

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Long Covid: an unfolding story

Thursday 08 April 2021

04/08/2021

04/08/2021

With vaccination programmes underway across the globe, attention is turning to the longer-term impact of COVID-19 and in particular the condition termed ‘long Covid’. Very little is known about the condition at the moment, despite some studies estimating that 1 in 20 are affected.Large-scale research projects and population studies are now looking at the reported symptoms to understand what long Covid is, why some people are affected for months, and how we can treat it.Join Professor Brian Cox as he talks to scientists working at the forefront of research into long Covid, and campaigners with personal experience of the devastating effect it can have on lives.This event is part of a series of Royal Society events discussing the scientific response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Catch up with the first event on the Royal Society’s YouTube channel.SpeakersThe event will be hosted by Professor Brian Cox, the Royal Society’s Professor for Public Engagement in Science, who will be joined by:  Dr Nisreen Alwan, Associate Professor in Public Health, University of Southampton Professor Nishi Chaturvedi, MRC Unit for Lifelong Health & Ageing, University College London Professor Paul Elliott, Director of the REACT programme, and Chair in Epidemiology and Public Health Medicine, Imperial College London Dr Adam Rutherford, geneticist, author, and presenter of BBC’s Radio 4’s Inside Science Attending the event The event will be livestreamed on the Royal Society YouTube channel on Thursday 8 April at 6pm BST This event is free to join and there is no registration required Live subtitles will be available For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.orgWe cannot give medical advice or respond to individuals. If you are concerned or need advice about long Covid, please visit the NHS COVID recovery website.

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Computers and Computer People, 1950s-1990s

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Tuesday 16 March 2021

03/16/2021

03/16/2021

Catch up on the full playlist of videos on our YouTube channel.This workshop brings together experts in computing and the history of computing for a wide-ranging series of talks on the IT industry in the UK, 1950-2000.Divided into four sections (hardware, AI, people and software), and featuring contributions from Royal Society Fellows Alan Bundy, Steve Furber and David May, the talks cover topics as diverse as the Manchester Baby, LEO, transputers and the history of IBM software.With over three hours of content, the workshop videos provide a rich source of information for anyone interested in the highs – and lows – of the development of the computer industry in the UK.Computer workshop programme (PDF)Computer workshop abstract (PDF)Computer workshop speaker biographies (PDF)

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Celebrating science with the Young People’s Book Prize

Why is the world round? Who discovered antibiotics by accident? What makes my tummy gurgle? Where does my favourite chocolate come from? 

Friday 12 March 2021

03/12/2021

03/12/2021

The shortlist for Young People’s Book Prize 2020 has been inspiring children across the UK to discover and search for the answers to these questions, and many more. And now, after much deliberation, the votes from over 13,000 children from 530 schools and groups have been compiled to select the winner.In a family-friendly virtual award ceremony hosted by Blue Peter’s Lindsey Russell, meet the authors and put your questions to them before one of their books is crowned the winner of the Young People’s Book Prize 2020.The authors joining us live for the Q&A are: Neil deGrasse Tyson, Astrophysics for Young People in a Hurry Izzi Howell, Cats React to Science Facts Stella Gurney (Libby Deutsch) and Valpuri Kerttula, The Everyday Journeys of Ordinary Things Katie Brosnan, Gut Garden Aimee Lucido, In the Key of CodeThe Young People’s Book Prize is made possible thanks to the generosity of an anonymous donor. Discover more about the Prize.You can submit your questions for our authors ahead of time here. Attending the event The event will be livestreamed on the Royal Society YouTube channel on Friday 12 March at 12.30pm GMT This event is free to join and there is no registration required Live subtitles will be available For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

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Building the future: animate materials

What could a future with animate materials look like?Imagine a future where roads can self-heal, tiny robotic molecules can assemble themselves into household objects, and living buildings can harvest carbon…

Wednesday 10 March 2021

03/10/2021

03/10/2021

Animate materials are human-made materials that are able to grow and adapt to their environment. Behaving like living systems, these materials have the potential to deliver major changes in our lives from infrastructure to medicine and clothing.Led by your ideas, join our panellists as they discuss what animate materials are, how they could be used to shape our future lives, and the challenges that may lie ahead.This event is a part of British Science Week 2021.Read the animate materials report. Have your sayWe are asking you to help create a “library of future materials”.What animate materials do you think could exist in the future? Are there any materials with lifelike properties that you think could have a positive impact on society? Do you think there are any down sides to this technology and, if so, what are they? Find out more on how to submit your ideas. Speakers Professor Mark Miodownik MBE, FREng, Professor of Materials and Society, University College London Professor Russell Morris FRS, Professor of Structural and Materials Chemistry, University of St Andrews Professor Molly Stevens FREng FRS, Professor of Biomedical Materials and Regenerative Medicine, Imperial College London Professor Rebecca Earley, Professor of Sustainable Fashion Textile Design, Centre for Circular Design, University of the Arts London.Resources for teachersThe Royal Society has created animate materials resources for teachers and a new cross-curricular challenge for students of all ages: The future of stuff. Find out more about our teacher resources. 

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Day 4 highlights – 2021 Commonwealth Science Conference: Science for a resilient future

Friday 26 February 2021

02/26/2021

02/26/2021

The third Commonwealth Science Conference will take place virtually from 22-26 February 2021, co-organised by the Royal Society and the African Academy of Sciences. The conference is funded via the UK government’s Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF), part of the UK’s Official Development Assistance (ODA).The theme of the conference will be “Science for a resilient future”, with three main sub-themes: Developing resilient energy systems – climate resilient infrastructure; decarbonising energy systems; and a circular economy for the Commonwealth  Nurturing resilient ecosystems – challenges and opportunities for the blue economy; trajectories, challenges and solutions for biodiversity; and adaptation and mitigation challenges for coastal states in the era of climate change Building resilient societal systems – pandemic preparedness before and after Covid-19; climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction; and a ‘just transition’ to a sustainable CommonwealthDay 4 highlights include keynote talks and panel discussions:  Panel discussion on Towards a sustainable recovery from Covid-19  Chair: Professor Dame Anne Johnson, Professor of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, University College London. UK  Speakers:  Paul Dickinson, Executive Chair, CDP, UK  Dr Tolullah Oni, Clinical Senior Research Fellow, Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, UK  Professor Salim Abdool Karim, CAPRISA Professor for Global Health in the Department of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University  Dr Agnes Kalibata, President of the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA) on Building resilient food systems to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals Professor Richard Leakey, Professor of Anthropology at Stony Brook University’s Turkana Basin Institute on Science and AfricaWatch Baroness Scotland, the Secretary General of the Commonwealth’s, closing remarks For all enquiries, please contact csc@royalsociety.orgAbstractsBuilding resilient food systems to achieve the Sustainable Development GoalsDr Agnes Kalibata, President, Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA), RwandaWith less than 10 years remaining, the world is not on track to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and targets of the 2015 Paris Declaration, and in some cases like hunger and Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs0, the world is moving in the wrong direction. The COVID-19 pandemic has meanwhile exposed dangerous deficiencies in our food systems, actively threatening the lives and livelihoods of people around the world, particularly the most vulnerable and those in fragile contexts. Millions more are at risk of hunger and losing their jobs. Building more resilient, inclusive, and sustainable food systems is an imperative for all communities and countries in the world. Even before the onset of the current crisis, the evidence for transformation had never been clearer. Food systems are in many cases part of the problem, but there is scientific consensus that transforming food systems also offers one of the best opportunities we have to change course and realize the vision of the 2030 Agenda, in support of the UN Secretary-General’s call to “build back better” from COVID-19. Over the past year, the pandemic has also highlighted the connectedness of countries around the world and the need to bring the best of our collective science, innovation and technology to bear in our search for solutions. If these are harnessed properly, then we can change the trajectory of the decade and scale up food systems approaches that work for all people, the planet, and prosperity. As Special Envoy of the UN Secretary-General for the Food Systems Summit, Dr Agnes Kalibata is working day-to-day with Member States and constituencies all around the world to accelerate transformative change in the way the world produces, processes, consumes, and disposes of food. Her remarks will speak to not only the need for more resilient food systems to achieve the SDGs, but even more importantly, how actors across the world and the scientific community need to contribute to his process to make it a reality for all people in their own unique country and community contexts.Science and Africa Professor Richard Leakey, Chairman, Turkana Basin Institute LTD, KenyaThe fate of the natural world is of great concern and requires solutions. This talk outlines the action and commitment required by governments, individuals, and the global scientific community to enable societies to live sustainably and in balance with nature. This talk will be followed by a live Q&A session with Professor Richard Leakey.Towards a sustainable recovery from Covid-19This panel discussion will bring together several of the conference’s keynote speakers, who include some of the Commonwealth’s leading experts on health and other global challenges. In the run-up to the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Kigali in June 2021, they will consider how scientists and policymakers can help their societies, and the Commonwealth as a whole, emerge from the COVID-19 crisis in as sustainable and inclusive a manner as possible, whilst also addressing other critical challenges such as climate change and biodiversity. Speakers confirmed for this panel discussion include Paul Dickinson, Executive Chair, CDP; Dr Tolullah Oni, Clinical Senior Research Fellow, Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge; and Professor Salim Abdool Karim, CAPRISA Professor for Global Health in the Department of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University.

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Day 3 highlights – 2021 Commonwealth Science Conference: Science for a resilient future

Thursday 25 February 2021

02/25/2021

02/25/2021

The third Commonwealth Science Conference will take place virtually from 22-26 February 2021, co-organised by the Royal Society and the African Academy of Sciences. The conference is funded via the UK government’s Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF), part of the UK’s Official Development Assistance (ODA).The theme of the conference will be “Science for a resilient future”, with three main sub-themes: Developing resilient energy systems – climate resilient infrastructure; decarbonising energy systems; and a circular economy for the Commonwealth  Nurturing resilient ecosystems – challenges and opportunities for the blue economy; trajectories, challenges and solutions for biodiversity; and adaptation and mitigation challenges for coastal states in the era of climate change Building resilient societal systems – pandemic preparedness before and after Covid-19; climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction; and a ‘just transition’ to a sustainable Commonwealth Day 3 highlights include keynote talks and panel discussions:  Dr Tollullah Oni, Clinical Senior Research Fellow, Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge on Health-proofing our future; Future-proofing our planet Panel discussion: Science and policy – lessons from the pandemic and its impact  Chair: Peter Gluckman, Chair, International Network for Government Science Advice (INGSA); co-chair, Commonwealth Science Advice Network (CSAN); President-elect, International Science Council Speakers:  Sir Patrick Vallance, UK government Chief Scientific Adviser and co-chair CSAN, UK Dr Sabin Nsanzimana, Director-General of Rwanda Biomedical Centre (RBC)  Associate Professor Vernon Lee, Deputy Director for Communicable Diseases in the Singapore Ministry of Health, Singapore  Professor Mona Nemer, Chief Scientific Advisor to the Prime Minister of Canada, Canada  Professor Krishnaswamy VijayRaghavan, Principal Scientific Adviser to the Government of India, India  Sir Hilary Beckles, Vice-Chancellor of the University of the West Indies on Science for a sustainable future Panel discussion: Developing and strengthening networks of ECRs to address global development challenges  Chair: Chai Lay Ching – Chair, Young Scientists Network-Academy of Sciences Malaysia  Speakers: Lucy Stewart, Chair, Royal Society Te Apārangi ECR Forum, New Zealand Dr Karly Kehoe, President – College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists, Royal Society of Canada Joanes Atela, Convener, Africa Research & Impact Network, Nairobi Stuart Minchin, Director General, Pacific CommunityAttending this event The event will be livestreamed on the Royal Society YouTube channel on Thursday 25 February 2021 at 6pm GMT The event is free to join, and there is no registration required Live subtitles will be availableFor all enquiries, please contact csc@royalsociety.orgAbstractsHealth-proofing our future; Future-proofing our planetDr Tolullah Oni, Public Health Physician Scientist and Urban Epidemiologist, and Clinical Senior Research Fellow, Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, UKBetween 2000 and 2050 it is anticipated that there will be an increase in growth of urban communities globally, particularly on the African and Asian continents. This presentation outlines the link between urban growth, disease trends and health inequalities, and sets out the importance of reimagining the urban. Dr Oni introduces the notion of health and resilience foresight as an important approach to bringing the future into the present and thinking more long term about human and planetary health, as well as approaches from her own research that she uses to bring the future into the present.Science for a sustainable future Sir Hilary Beckles, Vice-Chancellor, University of the West Indies, JamaicaThe creation of an interdisciplinary dynamic discourse around resilience and sustainability and an interface between historical and medical sciences is required to decolonise the sciences. This presentation discusses the concepts of resilience and sustainability and considers the link between colonisation, racial inequality and injustice in how climate change and Covid-19 are experienced by citizens of small island states in the Caribbean.Science and policy – lessons from the pandemic and its impactChair: Peter Gluckman, Chair, International Network for Government Science Advice (INGSA); co-chair, Commonwealth Science Advice Network (CSAN); President-elect, International Science CouncilAs the Covid-19 pandemic spread across the world in the last year, discussions around the politics of science advice gained an unprecedented level of prominence. Many national and international debates on combatting the virus centred around issues such as levels of uncertainty, the accuracy of modelling, policy trade-offs, and the need to synthesise and act on a wide range of input across disciplines in the natural and social sciences. While these debates played out in the context of the pandemic, and the varying national and regional responses to it, their implications are much wider. As the world considers the prospects for a sustainable recovery from the pandemic, and the need to take urgent action on a number of other critical global challenges such as climate change and biodiversity, a robust and effective science-policy interface has never been more important. This debate will bring together leading science advisers and decision makers from across the Commonwealth to discuss the key lessons from the pandemic for the relationship between science and policy, and how early career researchers can ensure the translation of their research into science advice to policy makers to best effect.Developing and strengthening networks of ECRs to address global development challengesChair: Chai Lay Ching – Chair, Young Scientists Network-Academy of Sciences Malaysia As the growing and interlinked crises of climate change, biodiversity and sustainability become ever more urgent, the pressures on the next generation of scientists to keep track of these impacts, identify and refine solutions, and influence policymakers to take coordinated action, are growing. Developing new, and strengthening existing, international networks of early career researchers from a wide range of perspectives and across a growing range of disciplines will therefore be essential. In this discussion, leading early career researchers from across the Commonwealth, with input from at least one senior policymaker, will consider what the next generation of researchers need most in order to address these challenges in as effective, coordinated and equitable way as possible.

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Day 2 highlights – 2021 Commonwealth Science Conference: Science for a resilient future

Wednesday 24 February 2021

02/24/2021

02/24/2021

The third Commonwealth Science Conference will take place virtually from 22-26 February 2021, co-organised by the Royal Society and the African Academy of Sciences. The conference is funded via the UK government’s Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF), part of the UK’s Official Development Assistance (ODA).The theme of the conference will be “Science for a resilient future”, with three main sub-themes: Developing resilient energy systems – climate resilient infrastructure; decarbonising energy systems; and a circular economy for the Commonwealth  Nurturing resilient ecosystems – challenges and opportunities for the blue economy; trajectories, challenges and solutions for biodiversity; and adaptation and mitigation challenges for coastal states in the era of climate change Building resilient societal systems – pandemic preparedness before and after Covid-19; climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction; and a ‘just transition’ to a sustainable CommonwealthDay 2 highlights include keynote talks and panel discussions:  Paul Dickinson, Executive Chair at the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) on Looking at climate change from a Social Science perspective Dr Kelly Chibale, Professor of Organic Chemistry at the University of Cape Town on the H3D Story: Entrepreneurship in science while addressing unmet medical needs in Africa Professor Julie Makani, Fellow, Tanzania Academy of Sciences and Royal Society Africa Award 2011 on Can Genomics Improve Health in Africa? Establishing Gene Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease in Tanzania Laureate Professor Peter Doherty at the University of Melbourne on The impact of the pandemic on scienceAttending this event The event will be livestreamed on the Royal Society YouTube channel on Wednesday 24 February 2021 at 6pm GMT The event is free to join, and there is no registration required Live subtitles will be availableFor all enquiries, please contact csc@royalsociety.orgAbstractsLooking at climate change from a Social Science perspectivePaul Dickinson, Executive Chair, Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP), UKFor over thirty years scientists have issued ever more grave warnings regarding the risks presented by accelerating climate change driven by greenhouse gas emissions from human industry. This talk explains that resolution of these problems will require attention to social science issues as well as atmospheric science. This talk encourages the audience to consider the global business system, both large corporations and investors, as political actors in society. The talk explains how corporations can be supported to evolve rational action in response to global risk. The H3D Story: Entrepreneurship in science while addressing unmet medical needs in AfricaProfessor Kelly Chibale, Neville Isdell Chair in African-centric Drug Discovery and Development, University of Cape Town, South AfricaGaps in scientific infrastructure, enabling technology platforms and a critical mass of skilled scientists have hampered African-led health innovation. Unless these gaps are addressed, Africa will not be able to build resilient societal health systems and will always be reliant on external partners to address the continent’s health challenges. This will in turn also make it extremely challenging to effectively respond to new pandemics.On the other hand, entrepreneurship in science is rarely encouraged and incentivized in Africa. While there are large numbers of African scientists graduating, as well as a large number that forms part of the African diaspora, supporting scientific entrepreneurship can help move the continent forward in terms of using science for development, including creating jobs. Therefore, there is a strong need to find sustainable solutions that embed entrepreneurship in African-led health innovation strategies.  This lecture will describe the journey of H3D, the University of Cape Town Drug Discovery and Development Centre, in the development of world-class scientific infrastructure and enabling technology platforms for health innovation. Entrepreneurship in science and initiatives aimed at building a critical mass of skilled scientists across the continent of Africa in a sustainable manner will also be described.  Can Genomics Improve Health in Africa? Establishing Gene Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease in TanzaniaProfessor Julie Makani, Fellow, Tanzania Academy of Sciences; Royal Society Africa Award 2011), TanzaniaSickle cell disease (SCD) is considered a model disease for genomic research, as it is a single-gene disorder, causing high morbidity and mortality, with limited interventions. The first report of gene therapy to cure SCD was from France in 2017, demonstrating the clinical applicability of genomics to cure disease. The highest public health burden of SCD in the world is in Africa (80% of 300,000 annual births) and there is concern that individuals in Africa not only do not have access to existing public health interventions,but will not likely have access to these new gene-based curative therapies. Therefore, countries in Africa have to develop a strategy to achieve two goals; the first goal is the establishment of health programmes that will provide universal access to effective evidence-based health interventions to all individuals with SCD whilst simultaneously pursuing the second goal; which is to conduct research that will lead to curative interventions using genomics. Tanzania is establishing a national public health programme for SCD and has established a genomic programme, which has successfully conducted one of the first genome-wide association studies in SCD in Africa. Using these two platforms, Tanzania aims to conduct gene therapy trials to cure SCD in Tanzania and use the public health system to make these interventions accessible.  Interview with Nobel Laureate Professor Peter Doherty Laureate Professor Peter Doherty, The University of Melbourne, AustraliaJulie Maxton, Executive Director of the Royal Society, interviews Laureate Professor Peter Doherty, winner of the 1996 Nobel Prize in Physiology of Medicine, on the response of the global scientific community to the Covid-19 pandemic. The interview focuses on the impact of the pandemic on science, what lessons can be drawn from the pandemic, and how early career researchers can most effectively contribute to the fight against Covid.

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Day 1 highlights – 2021 Commonwealth Science Conference: Science for a resilient future

Tuesday 23 February 2021

02/23/2021

02/23/2021

The third Commonwealth Science Conference will take place virtually from 22-26 February 2021, co-organised by the Royal Society and the African Academy of Sciences. The conference is funded via the UK government’s Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF), part of the UK’s Official Development Assistance (ODA).The theme of the conference will be “Science for a resilient future”, with three main sub-themes: Developing resilient energy systems – climate resilient infrastructure; decarbonising energy systems; and a circular economy for the Commonwealth  Nurturing resilient ecosystems – challenges and opportunities for the blue economy; trajectories, challenges and solutions for biodiversity; and adaptation and mitigation challenges for coastal states in the era of climate change Building resilient societal systems – pandemic preparedness before and after Covid-19; climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction; and a ‘just transition’ to a sustainable CommonwealthDay 1 highlights include keynote talks from:  Professor Gagandeep Kang, Professor of Microbiology, Wellcome Trust Research Laboratory, Division of Gastrointestinal Sciences at Christian Medical College (CMC) on What is our ‘new normal’?: Vaccines and resilience in the time of SARS-CoV2 Professor Veena Sahajwalla, Professor of Materials Science in the Faculty of Science at the University of New South Wales on Aligning recycling and manufacturing  Professor Salim Abdool Karim, CAPRISA Professor for Global Health at Columbia University on A tale of two pandemics: AIDS and Covid-19  His Excellency Anote Tong, Former President of Kiribati on The impact of sea level rise on small island states Professor Tshilidzi Marwala, Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the University of Johannesburg on The Fourth Industrial Society, and the Economy  Attending this event The event will be livestreamed on the Royal Society YouTube channel on Tuesday 23 February 2021 at 6pm GMT The event is free to join, and there is no registration required Live subtitles will be availableFor all enquiries, please contact csc@royalsociety.orgAbstractsInterview with His Excellency Anote TongHis Excellency, Anote Tong, Former President of KiribatiElaine Sadler, Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Sydney, interviews Anote Tong, former President of Kiribati and advocate for ocean conservation. 24 of the Commonwealth’s 54 member states are small island developing states. The interview focuses on the impact of sea level rise on small island states, the importance of ocean and marine conservation, and the role of the Commonwealth and the global scientific community in addressing the impact of climate change on the oceans.Aligning recycling and manufacturingProfessor Veena Sahajwalla, Australian Research Council (ARC) Laureate Professor, The University of New South Wales, AustraliaWe need to look at waste, recycling and manufacturing in a new way and to acknowledge the valuable materials contained in waste. Virgin resources are finite and rather than sending waste items to landfill or other unsustainable disposal methods, we need to reuse those materials over and over to support the new products and materials needed by societies. Waste therefore is a type of new ‘renewable resource’ for us to mine and use as feedstock materials for manufacturing. By aligning manufacturing and recycling, communities can become more resilient and sustainable. This presentation explores and provides examples of how we can take so called “end of life” waste products and reform them into materials for remanufacturing.What is our ‘new normal’?: Vaccines and resilience in the time of SARS-CoV2Professor Gagandeep Kang, Professor of Microbiology, Wellcome Trust Research Laboratory, Division of Gastrointestinal Sciences, Christian Medical College (CMC), IndiaWhat is our new normal in thinking about vaccines, especially at a time of SARS CoV2? From AIDS to Zika, this presentation examines why there is an increase in epidemics and pandemics and the lessons that can be drawn from these outbreaks; the development of the CoV2 vaccine and what the future holds for the current pandemic; and also, pandemics in the future.A tale of two pandemics: AIDS and Covid-19Professor Salim Abdool Karim, Director, Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA), South AfricaSouth Africa has the highest number of Covid-19 cases in Africa, reporting over 1.3 million cases and 38,000 deaths by 20 January 2021. The Covid-19 epidemic has unfolded against a backdrop of a substantial HIV epidemic in the country, which accounts for 1 in every 5 people living with HIV in the world. Early predictions raised concerns that people with compromised immunity, such as those living with HIV, particularly those with low CD4 T-cell counts, would be at higher risk of developing severe Covid-19. Although some studies have shown that the clinical presentation and outcomes of Covid-19 in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals are similar, others find an increased risk of death in HIV-infected individuals. In addition to deaths, the Covid-19 epidemic has impacted the HIV response in several ways. Firstly, key resources used for control of HIV, including: diagnostic platforms, community outreach, programs, medical care access, and research infrastructure, were redirected to control COVID-19. Secondly, the national lockdown early in the epidemic resulted in a significant decrease in patient attendance at health care facilities, potentially reversing the gains made over the past 2 decades. Delays in HIV testing impedes initiation of ART, potentially increasing the risk of new infections and drug resistance.This presentation will highlight ten lessons from HIV for the Covid-19 response. Scientific evidence has assumed new importance in decision-making and both pandemics have provided a new lens for the nexus between science, policy-making and global health in pursing the sustainable development goals, with equity and social justice as guiding principles.The Fourth Industrial Society, and the Economy Professor Tshilidzi Marwala, Vice-Chancellor and Principal, University of Johannesburg, South AfricaAs we wage a war against the coronavirus pandemic, the global economy has taken a hit likened to the great depression. South Africa, which has been in an economic downturn for a decade, is far worse off than many other nations. As we begin to rethink our policies and strategies to rebuild the economy, our focus needs to shift towards embracing a digital transformation. The economic benefits of the fourth industrial revolution (4IR) are apparent. If we are to emerge on the other side stronger, we have to begin to tap into policies that speak to this shift – beginning with implementing our national 4IR blueprint. The pandemic has confirmed that the 4IR is certainly here, we must adapt in order to be relevant!

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Explaining Humans with Dr Camilla Pang

What science can teach us about life, love and relationships.How do we understand the people around us? How do we recognise people’s motivations, their behaviour, or even their facial expressions? And, when do we…

Monday 22 February 2021

02/22/2021

02/22/2021

Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder at the age of eight, Camilla Pang struggled to understand the world around her and the way people worked. Desperate for a solution, Camilla asked her mother if there was an instruction manual for humans that she could consult. But, without the blueprint to life she was hoping for, Camilla began to create her own. Now armed with a PhD in biochemistry, Camilla dismantles our obscure social customs and identifies what it really means to be human using her unique expertise and a language she knows best: science.This event is hosted by author and TV & Radio presenter Claudia Hammond.Winner of the 2020 Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize. About the speakerDr Camilla Pang holds a PhD in Biochemistry from University College London and is a Postdoctoral Scientist specialising in Translational Bioinformatics. This event is part of NI Science Festival 2021.

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Can we adapt to a changing climate?

Throughout history, humanity’s survival has depended, in part, on our ability to adapt to natural fluctuations in our environment. And now, as our planet faces unprecedented shifts in the climate, it has never been…

Thursday 18 February 2021

02/18/2021

02/18/2021

Chaired by journalist and former Climate Change Editor at Nature magazine, Dr Gabrielle Walker, this discussion explored stories of climate adaptation from humanity’s past, and the importance of adaptation in the future. Panelists included polar and paleoclimate expert Professor Eric Wolff FRS, environmental journalist, broadcaster and Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize winner, Gaia Vince, and archaeologist of Alaskan Indigenous sites, Dr Rick Knecht. This event is being held in partnership with the British Museum and is part of the public programme accompanying the Museum’s Citi exhibition Arctic: culture and climate.

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You and the planet: air

Air pollution causes around 7 million premature deaths every year, according to the World Health Organisation. And, as well as the impact on human health, poor air quality and increasing greenhouse gases in our…

Tuesday 16 February 2021

02/16/2021

02/16/2021

From the cars we drive, fuels we burn and animals we farm to the garbage we landfill and beyond, human activity continues to be the main source of pollutants in our air. Without urgent action, we will continue to see increasing global temperatures, extreme weather, damage to biodiversity and loss of human life. But what can we do to tackle the problem we are currently facing? And how can we take clean, fresh steps forward? The event was hosted in partnership with Manchester Science Festival and was also streamed as a part of NI Science Festival. SpeakersThe event was hosted by Helen Pidd, North of England editor of the Guardian and founding member of Walk Ride Greater Manchester. Helen was joined by:  Professor David Fowler CBE FRSE FRS, world leading expert on air pollution, formerly of the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology Dr Mark Richards, Senior Lecturer and Head of Outreach in the Department of Physics at Imperial College London Dr Ther Wint Aung, energy poverty expert and a National Geographic Explorer leading citizen science air monitoring activities in Myanmar Dr Suzanne Bartington, Clinical Research Fellow in Environmental Health in the Institute of Applied Health Research and Honorary Consultant in Public Health at Public Health England

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Shining a light on the brain

The brain is the most complex organ in the human body and the intricate systems and interactions within enable us to sense, feel, think and do. Being able to map these networks and the billions of connections that…

Tuesday 09 February 2021

02/09/2021

02/09/2021

Professor Ed Boyden is Y. Eva Tan Professor in Neurotechnology at MIT and professor of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Media Arts and Sciences, and Biological Engineering, at MIT’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. His discoveries in the emerging field of neurotechnology have revolutionised the way we analyse and repair the brain.From expansion microscopy, which enables complex biological systems to be imaged with nanoscale precision, to optogenetics, with which individual neurons and pathways can be turned on or off using a beam of light, Professor Boyden talks about his research that led to him being awarded the Croonian Medal and Lecture 2020. The awardThe Croonian Medal and Lecture is the premier lecture in the biological sciences. The lectureship was conceived by William Croone FRS (PDF), one of the original Fellows of the Society. Professor Edward Boyden was awarded the Croonian Medal and Lecture 2020 for his inventions that expand our understanding of the brain and allow therapeutic development including the co-invention of optogenetics, a technology that has revolutionized neurobiology.Enquiries: contact the Events team

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The Economics of Biodiversity: the Dasgupta Review

Tuesday 02 February 2021

02/02/2021

02/02/2021

Biodiversity is declining faster than at any time in human history. Since 1970, there has been on average almost a 70% decline in the populations of mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, and amphibians. It is thought that one million animal and plant species  – almost a quarter of the global total – are threatened with extinction. These losses in biodiversity are undermining the productivity, resilience and adaptability of nature. This is in turn putting economies, livelihoods and well-being at risk. Join economist Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta and Nobel-prize winning biologist Sir Venki Ramakrishnan to mark the publication of The Economics of Biodiversity: The Dasgupta Review. Commissioned by the UK Government, this independent, global Review will present a new economic framework, grounded in ecology and Earth Sciences, in order to understand the sustainability of our engagement with Nature, and identify the options humanity has to enhance biodiversity and prosperity.Hosted by Venki Ramakrishnan and joined by several special guests, Professor Dasgupta will outline the Review’s central findings and respond to questions from the audience. Questions can be submitted in advance, as well as throughout the event, on Sli.do.Attending this event The event will be livestreamed on the Royal Society YouTube channel on Tuesday 2 February 2021 at 2pm GMT The event is free to join, and there is no registration required Live subtitles will be available For all enquiries, please contact science.policy@royalsociety.org

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The race for a vaccine

Will vaccines provide the solution to the coronavirus pandemic?

Thursday 28 January 2021

01/28/2021

01/28/2021

December 2020 saw the rollout of the first regulatory approved vaccine against COVID-19 in the UK and many other countries, providing a glimmer of hope for many. However, the path to effectively managing the disease has only just begun. With potential public hesitation and misinformation around the effectiveness of the vaccines, transparency and communication around the process has never been more important. How have vaccines against the virus been developed so quickly? How do we know they are safe?Hosted by Professor Brian Cox, our panel of expert speakers discussed the collaborative global effort of the scientific community over the past year to develop the COVID-19 vaccine. They explored what we currently know about the vaccines that are being deployed or in development and took a forward look at what the next few months and years may hold for us as we continue to tackle this universal public health crisis. This event is part of a series of Royal Society events discussing the scientific response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Catch up with the first event on the Royal Society’s YouTube channel.Speakers Professor Brian Cox CBE FRS, the Royal Society’s Professor for Public Engagement in Science (event host) Professor Melinda Mills FBA, Nuffield Professor of Sociology and Director of the Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science, University of Oxford Professor Charles Bangham FRS, Co-Director of the Institute of Infection, Imperial College London Dr Rino Rappuoli ForMemRS, Chief Scientist and Head of External Research & Development, GSK Vaccines

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The race for a vaccine

Will vaccines provide the solution to the coronavirus pandemic?

Thursday 28 January 2021

01/28/2021

01/28/2021

December 2020 saw the rollout of the first regulatory approved vaccine against COVID-19 in the UK and many other countries, providing a glimmer of hope for many. However, the path to effectively managing the disease has only just begun. With potential public hesitation and misinformation around the effectiveness of the vaccines, transparency and communication around the process has never been more important. How have vaccines against the virus been developed so quickly? How do we know they are safe?Hosted by Professor Brian Cox, our panel of expert speakers discussed the collaborative global effort of the scientific community over the past year to develop the COVID-19 vaccine. They explored what we currently know about the vaccines that are being deployed or in development and took a forward look at what the next few months and years may hold for us as we continue to tackle this universal public health crisis. This event is part of a series of Royal Society events discussing the scientific response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Catch up with the first event on the Royal Society’s YouTube channel.Speakers Professor Brian Cox CBE FRS, the Royal Society’s Professor for Public Engagement in Science (event host) Professor Melinda Mills FBA, Nuffield Professor of Sociology and Director of the Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science, University of Oxford Professor Charles Bangham FRS, Co-Director of the Institute of Infection, Imperial College London Dr Rino Rappuoli ForMemRS, Chief Scientist and Head of External Research & Development, GSK Vaccines

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Putting the sun in a bottle: the path to delivering sustainable fusion power

The Royal Society Kavli Medal and Lecture 2019 given by Professor Ian Chapman.

Wednesday 27 January 2021

01/27/2021

01/27/2021

The imperative to address climate change is only escalating. Fusion – the process that powers the Sun – offers the potential for carbon-free, effectively limitless, continuous electricity, if only it can be harnessed here on Earth. Professor Ian Chapman and his colleagues are working to make fusion power a reality, and with the advent of ITER, the largest science experiment humankind has ever undertaken, they hope to demonstrate fusion power on a commercial scale. The UK, as one of the world leaders in fusion, is embarking on the design of a compact fusion reactor to follow ITER which aims to drive down the scale and cost of fusion power, which Professor Chapman explained and explored during his prize lecture.  The award The Royal Society Kavli Medal and Lecture is now awarded annually for excellence in all fields of science and engineering relevant to the environment. The medal is of bronze gilt and is accompanied by a gift of £1,000.Professor Ian Chapman was awarded the Kavli Medal and Lecture 2019 for his scientific insight that has illuminated the complex physics of confined plasmas and prepared the way for fusion burn.  Enquiries: contact the Events team

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How we learn, predict and decide: the circuit basis of behaviour

Francis Crick Lecture 2020 delivered by Dr Marta Zlatic

Wednesday 20 January 2021

01/20/2021

01/20/2021

Learning, predicting, and deciding are fundamental brain functions essential for survival across the animal kingdom. Despite decades of investigation, we do not understand the rules governing biological intelligence. A major obstacle to progress has been the inability to determine the architecture of the circuits that implement these functions and to relate the architectural motifs to their function. To overcome this obstacle Dr Zlatic’s team have established the Drosophila larva as a powerful genetic model system, ideally suited for relating the structure of neural circuits to their function. In this system it is possible to map circuits with synaptic resolution and to record and manipulate the activity of uniquely identified neurons to determine their roles in behaviour. Using functional imaging and behavioural experiments, the team is identifying neurons and circuit motifs that regulate learning, compute predicted values, and select actions. In this talk, Dr Zlatic discussed the key findings from these studies and her team’s ongoing work to elucidate the basic principles by which brains learn, predict, and decide. The awardThe Francis Crick Medal and Lecture is awarded annually in any field in the biological sciences. Preference is given to genetics, molecular biology and neurobiology, the general areas in which Francis Crick worked, and to fundamental theoretical work, which was the hallmark of Crick’s science.The lectureship was endowed by Sydney Brenner FRS in memory of Francis Crick FRS, the co-discoverer of the structure of the DNA molecule. The first lecture was given in 2003. The medal is of bronze, is awarded annually and is accompanied by a gift of £2,000.The Francis Crick Medal and Lecture 2020 was awarded to Dr Marta Zlatic for discovering how neural circuits generate behaviour by developing and disseminating definitive techniques, and by discovering fundamental principles governing circuit development and function.Enquiries: contact the Events team

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Are threats to academic freedom damaging global science?

Thursday 10 December 2020

12/10/2020

12/10/2020

The Royal Society believes that academic freedom in the science community is an essential component of excellent science which benefit all of humanity. The Royal Society also recognises that this freedom is under growing threat in many parts of the world, not least as a result of growing political trends of nationalism, populism, and authoritarianism. This event, co-hosted with the Council for At-Risk Academics, marks both the launch of the Royal Society’s statement on academic freedom (PDF) and International Human Rights Day.Our panellists will discuss what threats to academic freedom faced by scientists around the world today look like and what scientific institutions can do to support the rights and freedoms of scientists globally.Our panel is made up of: Chair for the evening – Professor Jim Al-Khalili OBE FRS Professor Carlos Nobre Professor Veronica van Heyningen CBE FMedSci FRS The Lord Krebs Kt FMedSci FRS Zaher Al-Bakour, Cara FellowAttending this eventWe look forward to you joining us for an evening of discussion and debate on ‘are threats to academic freedom damaging global science?’ The event is free to join, registration is required Live subtitles will be available

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Digital Technologies and the Planet: Towards Net Zero

10 – 11 December 2020

12/10/2020

12/11/2020

Read the conference report summarising the event (PDF).View the conference talks on the Royal Society’s YouTube channel.Human activity has increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration by more than 40% since pre-industrial times. This, and increases in other greenhouse gases such as nitrous oxide, has led to a global average temperature rise of 1°C above pre-industrial levels. If emissions continue to increase at their present rate, temperatures could rise by more than 4°C by 2100. Limiting global warming to 1.5°C may still be feasible. To achieve a 1.5°C target, the net emissions of long-lived greenhouse gases, principally CO2, would have to reach ‘net zero’ level by around 2050. In the next decade urgent, ambitious and concerted action is required across all countries and sectors to deliver rapid emissions reductions. Rapid and unprecedented changes in energy, land use, urban development, transport, infrastructure and industrial systems are needed, with implications for how individuals live and work.Digital technologies could support this transformation. These technologies have already reshaped many daily activities – from online retail to on-demand transport services – with individuals using data-enabled systems to bring physical activities into the digital realm, reducing carbon emissions in the process. As technologies develop and systems for data use evolve, there will be further opportunities to find new ways of carrying out everyday tasks, with digital technologies bolstering a low-carbon revolution.This conference follows the launch of the Royal Society’s Digital Technologies and the Planet policy report on 3 December.Attending this event This online conference has been developed to help generate connections between industry, academia and government. We would welcome attendees involved in high-tech and digital industries, green technology, green recovery and the Just Transition, associated policy and finance bodies, as well as those with an interest in the social sciences. If you meet these criteria, or are otherwise interested, please do register for this event.Please direct any questions to the Industry team.About the conference seriesThis scientific meeting is part of the Royal Society’s Transforming our Future conference series. The Transforming our Future meetings are unique, high-level events that address the scientific and technical challenges of the next decade. Each conference features cutting edge science from industry and academia and brings together leading experts from the scientific community, including regulatory, charity and funding bodies.Join the Scientists mailing list to receive updates about the Royal Society’s activities and events. 

London

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The what, the how and the why of the pandemic

Our panel of expert scientists explored the science behind the pandemic, and discussed what it is about this particular virus that makes it so infectious and potentially life-threatening on an unprecedented global…

Monday 07 December 2020

12/07/2020

12/07/2020

The coronavirus pandemic has dominated our lives for a large part of 2020. As we face a second wave of infections and national lockdowns, scientists are working around the world to develop effective vaccines. They are also trying to understand how this strain of virus differs from other coronaviruses in the severity of the disease it causes, and what are the long-term effects of contracting the infection. Scientific research has never had to advance so fast to find solutions to a global public health crisis.Bringing together leaders in their field, this discussion explored our current understanding of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and looked to answer some of those burning questions: What do we currently know? How is science being used in the battle against COVID? Why has the pandemic been so devastating? We interrogated what the pandemic has revealed about society’s vulnerability to future infectious diseases, as well as exploring the past and future policy trade-offs that are the result of our ever-shifting knowledge about the disease. Speakers Dr Anjana Ahuja, Science Writer (event host) Professor Dame Anne Johnson DBE PMedSci, Professor of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, UCL and President of the Academy of Medical Sciences Professor Sir John Bell GBE FMedSci HonFREng FRS, Regius Professor of Medicine, University of Oxford Dr Nicole Robb, Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Fellow and Assistant Professor, Warwick Medical School Sir Jeremy Farrar OBE FMedSci FRS, Director, The Wellcome Trust

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Seeing the future: how our brains decide our actions

The Ferrier prize lecture given by Professor Ray Dolan FMedSci FRS, who was awarded the Ferrier Medal and Lecture 2019.

Thursday 03 December 2020

12/03/2020

12/03/2020

How do we decide what is the best course of action? How do we use prior experience to guide these actions? How do we decide when outcomes are delayed and uncertain? How do we deploy a model of our environment to assist us in choosing?Ray Dolan’s group, and collaborators, have tackled such questions over the past two decades. His group uses state of the art brain imaging techniques, combined with a mathematical analysis of behaviour, to probe how these abilities arise out of brain function. This research has revealed new and exciting principles of brain organisation and has also provided insights into how processes related to planning go awry in severe forms of psychiatric disorder.  The awardThe Ferrier Medal and Lecture is for distinguished contributions on the structure and function of the nervous system. The medal is of bronze gilt and is accompanied by a gift of £2,000.Professor Ray Dolan FMedSci FRS was awarded the Ferrier Medal and Lecture 2019 for his work charting the brain activity related to fundamental aspects of human conduct and behaviour.Enquiries: contact the Events team

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You and the planet: technology

Our panel of experts came together to discuss the incredible opportunities provided by digital technologies in mitigating climate change and helping us to achieve net zero.   

Thursday 03 December 2020

12/03/2020

12/03/2020

From the handheld device that fits in your pocket to the large-scale digital infrastructure that keeps our shelves stocked and cars driving, digital technologies underpin almost everything we do in modern society. And with that power, comes great potential to use these to tackle one of the biggest issues facing our world today, climate change.Machine learning, for example, can facilitate cleaner and greener journeys by analysing traffic data to lower congestion and reduce emissions in real time. Combining digital sensors with wireless networks and computer analysis can help farmers shift to smarter ways of farming where food production is optimised and waste minimised. And these are just two examples from a list of near endless applications – what other ways can digital technologies support us in the fight against climate change and biodiversity loss? Subscribe to the Royal Society YouTube channel, or follow us on Twitter @royalsociety or Facebook @theroyalsociety. SpeakersThis event was hosted by broadcaster and CEO of TeenTech, Maggie Philbin. Professor Corinne Le Quéré FRS CBE is Royal Society Research Professor of Climate Change Science at the University of East Anglia, where she conducts research on climate change and the carbon cycle, including the drivers of CO2 emissions. She is author of IPCC’s 3rd, 4th, and 5th Assessment reports and former Director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. She instigated and led for over a decade the annual update of the global carbon budget within the Global Carbon Project. She Chairs France’s Haut conseil pour le climat and is a member of the UK Committee on Climate Change. Dr Shakir Mohamed is a South African research scientist and lead at DeepMind, researching statistical machine learning and artificial intelligence. He works on advancing machine learning principles, applied questions in healthcare and climate, and sociotechnical systems, diversity and transformation. Shakir is also a founder and trustee of the Deep Learning Indaba, a grassroots organisation aiming to build pan-African capacity and ownership in AI. Shakir is the General Chair for the 2021 International conference on Learning Representations, an associate fellow of the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence at the University of Cambridge, and a member of the Royal Society’s Diversity Committee. You can follow him on twitter @shakir_za and online at shakirm.com.Victor Ohuruogu is currently Senior Africa Regional Manager for the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data (GPSDD), based at the UN Foundation. He leads and manages political and technical engagements, activities and products of the GPSDD in Africa. He provides guidance on how the GPSDD brings partners together to strengthen data ecosystems, and how various data sources can be accessed and used to achieve the SDGs and sustainable development more broadly.Dr Emily Shuckburgh is a mathematician and climate scientist and Director of Cambridge Zero at the University of Cambridge and Reader in Environmental Data Science at the Department of Computer Science and Technology. Dr Shuckburgh leads the UKRI Centre for Doctoral Training on the Application of AI to the study of Environmental Risks (AI4ER). She is a Fellow of the British Antarctic Survey and Royal Meteorological Society and co-chair of their Climate Science Communications Group. She has also acted as an advisor to the UK Government on behalf of the Natural Environment Research Council. In 2016 she was awarded an OBE for services to science and the public communication of science. She is co-author with HRH The Prince of Wales and Tony Juniper of the Ladybird Book on Climate Change.If you have any questions about the event, please reach out to us at events@royalsociety.org.  

Free Event

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Online

Ask the experts: Coronavirus – SNP Party conference fringe meeting

Monday 30 November 2020

11/30/2020

11/30/2020

This event is jointly hosted by the UK National Academies; the Royal Society, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the British Academy, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Medical Sciences. Researchers and innovators, including Fellows of the National Academies and people we fund, are working together across the globe to help us better understand COVID-19 and discover the best ways to treat, live with and ultimately to stop the virus. Join us to hear from researchers and innovators working to better understand COVID-19 and develop innovations and interventions to stop its spread. Panel: Tom Whipple, Science Editor at the Times and Sunday Times (Chair) Clare Adamson MSP  Dame Anne Glover, President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh  Professor Melinda Mills FBA Professor Massimo Palmarini FRSE FMedSci  Dr Shaun Fitzgerald FREngThe event is a fringe meeting of the Scottish National Party Conference. More information and registration for the conference can be found here. 

Free for attendees of the SNP party conference

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PAST EVENT

Online

Defining science through history

Our understandings of science are ever-changing, defined as much by our times as by the individual stories of scientists who contribute to it. 

Thursday 26 November 2020

11/26/2020

11/26/2020

Professor Simon Schaffer, Professor of History of Science at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of the British Academy, has revolutionised the definition of science in history – showcasing science and experimentation throughout the centuries not merely as accidental or a systematic testing of theories, but as a creative process firmly rooted in the gritty realities of everyday life.From the history of machines and automata and how they have defined human thought throughout the ages, to the narratives of scientific instruments, glass prisms and optics, Schaffer in his four-decade career gets to the very heart of scientific experimentation and its social and political contexts.In this ‘in-conversation’ style event, join Professor Schaffer and cultural historian Lubaaba Al-Azami for an evening of boundless conversation as they explore the very matter of science, and the uncharted territories where science, history, politics, and art meet.This event is the Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Medal and Lecture, which was awarded to Professor Simon Schaffer in 2019 for transforming understanding of the intellectual history of experimental science and his excellent communication of science in all media.Attending this event The event will be livestreamed on the Royal Society YouTube channel on 26 November at 6pm GMT The event is free to join, and there is no registration required Live subtitles will be available

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Online

Automatic understanding of the visual world

The Royal Society Milner Prize Lecture 2020 given by Dr Cordelia Schmid.

Wednesday 18 November 2020

11/18/2020

11/18/2020

One of the central problems of artificial intelligence is machine perception: the ability to understand the visual world based on input from sensors such as cameras. In this talk, Dr Schmid will present recent progress of her team in this direction, starting with presenting results on how to generate additional training data using weak annotations and synthetic data. Next, she will discuss her team’s results for action recognition in videos, which moves away from state-of-the-art frame-based approaches and improves classification and localization by relying on joint information from humans and objects over time. Such a model can also be adapted to behavior prediction for self-driving cars. Finally, Dr Schmid will present recent work on grasping with a robot arm based on learning long-horizon manipulations with a hierarchy of RL and imitation-based skills. The awardThe Royal Society Milner Award and Lecture, supported by Microsoft Research, is the premier European award for outstanding achievement in computer science. It is awarded to candidates at the peak of their career who have made a substantial contribution to computer science in Europe, with the strategic aim of supporting European researchers and institutes. The recipient is a European researcher or researcher who has been resident in Europe for 12 months or more, and is chosen by the Council of the Royal Society on the recommendation of the Milner Award Committee. The Committee is made up of Fellows of the Royal Society, Members of the Académie des sciences (France) and Members of Leopoldina (Germany). The award is named in honour of Professor Robin Milner FRS (1934-2010), a pioneer in computer science. The medal is of bronze, is awarded annually and is accompanied by a gift of £5,000. Dr Cordelia Schmid was awarded the Royal Society Milner Award and Lecture for her work in computer vision and her fundamental contributions to the representation of images and videos for visual recognition.Enquiries: contact the Events team

Free Event

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Online

Communicating statistics in the time of Covid

Throughout the Covid-19 pandemic, we have been exposed to more data and statistics than ever before. With decisions affecting everyone’s lives being made based on this data, understanding it has never been more…

Thursday 12 November 2020

11/12/2020

11/12/2020

Professor David Spiegelhalter, Chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication in the University of Cambridge, joins Tim Harford, columnist, broadcaster and author of How To Make The World Add Up in conversation about his current work focusing on communicating statistics, risk and evidence during the Covid-19 pandemic.This event is the Michael Faraday Prize Lecture 2020 awarded to Professor David Spiegelhalter OBE FRS for bringing key insights from the disciplines of statistics and probability vividly home to the public at large, and to key decision-makers, in entertaining and accessible ways, most recently through the Covid-19 pandemic.Attending this event The event will be livestreamed on the Royal Society YouTube channel on 12 November at 6pm GMT The event is free to join, and there is no registration required Live subtitles will be available

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Online

Is science writing the solution?

Is science writing the solution? A panel discussion hosted by Professor Alice Roberts, followed by the announcement of the winner of the 2020 Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize.At a time when the…

Tuesday 03 November 2020

11/03/2020

11/03/2020

During the pandemic, the celebrations for the annual Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize have taken on an urgent relevance.The books championed by the Insight Investment Science Book Prize embody compelling science communication and provide an opportunity for readers to engage more deeply with science in an uncertain world. Discover the 2020 shortlist.Join our panel of experts Professor Steve Jones, Fiona Fox and Rowan Hooper, as we announce the 2020 winner of the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize and explore the importance of, and challenges for, science writing at a time when the spotlight is firmly on science and science communication. Without our science communicators to publicly inform, explain, teach, decode, counter misinformation and debate science matters many would remain in a space where they don’t have [the] information they need, leading to poor choices being made at really crucial times. Jacinda Arden, Prime Minister of New ZealandAttending this event The event will be livestreamed on the Royal Society YouTube channel on 3 November at 6pm The event is free to join, and there is no registration required Live subtitles will be available

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PAST EVENT

Online

You and the planet: the new normal

Combating climate change and protecting global biodiversity was at the top of the world’s agenda before COVID-19 struck. And, while battling the pandemic remains at the forefront of global efforts, the climate…

Thursday 29 October 2020

10/29/2020

10/29/2020

With the world on lockdown, rapid changes in how society functions and travels have revealed some promising climate benefits, from falling carbon emissions to nature reclaiming land. People have had to change how they live and this presents an unprecedented opportunity to take greener and more sustainable steps forward. Moving towards a green economy where sustainability and climate resilience are a higher priority is crucial. At the heart of this transition should be people and the places they occupy, to ensure the benefits are shared, and that decisions that affect the many are not just taken by the few. Our panel of experts came together to discuss the so-called just transition and, as society emerges into the “new normal”, the opportunity we are presented with for a fair green recovery.This event was held in partnership with The British Academy. Subscribe to the Royal Society YouTube channel, or follow us on Twitter @royalsociety or Facebook @theroyalsociety.If you have any questions about the event, please reach out to us at events@royalsociety.org.  SpeakersThe event was hosted by the BBC’s Chief Environment correspondent, Justin Rowlatt. Pete Smith is Professor of Soils and Global Change at the Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences at the University of Aberdeen (Scotland, UK) and Science Director of the Scottish Climate Change Centre of Expertise (ClimateXChange).  His interests include climate change mitigation, soils, agriculture, food systems, ecosystem services and modelling. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology, a Fellow of the Institute of Soil Scientists, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, a Foreign Fellow of the Indian National Science Academy, a Fellow of the European Science Academy, and a Fellow of the Royal Society (London).Margreth Tadie is a Zimbabwean Chemical Engineer residing in South Africa. She is an academic at Stellenbosch University and a Fellow of the Royal Society’s ‘Future Leaders African Independent Researchers (FLAIR) programme. Margreth grew up in mining communities all over her home country Zimbabwe and has now dedicated her research towards empowering these communities through process development. Her passion is for addressing the environmental legacy created by waste and developing solutions to ensure a resilient earth and sustainable livelihoods.Jim Skea is Professor of Sustainable Energy at Imperial College London with research interests in energy, climate change and technological innovation. His current main role is as Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group III for the 6th assessment cycle. He was Research Director of the UK Energy Research Centre 2004-12 and Director of the Policy Studies Institute 1998-2004. He has operated at the interface between research, policy-making and business throughout his career. He was a member of the UK Committee on Climate Change from its inception in 2008 until 2018. He is currently chairing Scotland’s Just Transition Commission. Until June 2017, he was President of the UK Energy Institute. He was awarded a CBE for services to sustainable energy in 2013 and an OBE for services to sustainable transport in 2004.Harriet Bulkeley holds joint appointments as Professor in the Department of Geography, Durham University, and at the Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University. Her research focuses on environmental governance and the politics of climate change, energy and sustainable cities. Harriet currently Co-ordinates the H2020 NATURVATION project examining the role of urban innovation with nature based solutions for sustainable development. In 2014, Harriet was awarded the King Carl XVI Gustaf’s Professorship in Environmental Science and a Visiting Professorship at Lund University, Sweden and in 2018 was granted the Back Award by the Royal Geographical Society in recognition of the policy impact of her work on climate change. In 2019, she was elected as a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences and as a Fellow of the British Academy. 

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Online

An evening with Stephen Fry and Venki Ramakrishnan

The very nature of science is to establish truth about the world around us, from groundbreaking new discoveries, like the Higgs boson, gravitational waves or the potential for life in the clouds of Venus, to issues…

Tuesday 20 October 2020

10/20/2020

10/20/2020

While the growth of the internet and social media makes it easier than ever before to obtain information, the free-for-all nature of the internet also makes it difficult for the average citizen to distinguish fact from fiction, truth from mistruth, and legitimate sources from fake news. The onslaught against evidence-based facts is a growing problem. As an army of scientists continue to find themselves on the frontline of scientific discovery as they battle Covid-19, the role of scientific evidence and rational thought in an internet age of superstitions, rumours and pseudoscience has never been more apparent.Actor, comedian and author Stephen Fry joined Nobel Prize-winning biologist and President of the Royal Society, Venki Ramakrishnan to explore establishing trust in science and how individuals can make rational and objective decisions.Subscribe to the Royal Society YouTube channel, or follow us on Twitter @royalsociety or Facebook @theroyalsociety.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Online

Professor Brian Cox introduces the Science Book Prize

Join Professor Brian Cox as he introduces the shortlist for the 2020 Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize.

Monday 19 October 2020

10/19/2020

10/19/2020

Brian Cox, the Royal Society Professor for Public Engagement in Science and shortlisted authors Jim Al-Khalili, Bill Bryson, Susannah Cahalan, Camilla Pang, Linda Scott and Gaia Vince, will be discussing the unifying themes explored within the shortlisted books and the important role that science plays in our lives and in finding solutions to big, global challenges.The event will be in two parts:Panel 1 (7pm to 7.45pm): ‘The Beauty and Complexity of the Human Brain’Professor Brian Cox – HostBill BrysonSusannah CahalanDr Camilla PangPanel 2 (7.45pm to 8.30pm): ‘Human and Social Dynamics: How we understand and engage with the world around us, from Evolution and Cosmology to Gender Inequality’Professor Brian Cox – HostProfessor Jim Al-KhaliliProfessor Linda ScottGaia VinceThe Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize 2020 represents the very best in popular science writing from around the world for a non-specialist audience. The winner will be announced virtually on 3 November at 6pm.  Attending this event This event is hosted by Waterstones. A £5 General Admission ticket will grant you access to both panels but you are welcome to join for either one. This event will take place on Zoom, please make sure you have this installed and up to date on your device. For non-ticket enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

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Online

Making Europe a leader in AI: in conversation with Venki Ramakrishnan, Antoine Petit and Martin Stratmann

An international interactive online event organised by the Royal Society, the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the Max Planck Society.

Wednesday 07 October 2020

10/07/2020

10/07/2020

Artificial intelligence (AI) technologies have made rapid advances in the last decade, opening possibilities for new applications in healthcare, transport, education, science, and more. Europe has been at the forefront of considering the social and ethical implications of AI, and advancing research in these areas could help ensure that high quality AI research continues to have a strong home in Europe.In this event Venki Ramakrishnan, President of the Royal Society, Antoine Petit, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), and Martin Stratmann, President of the Max Planck Society, will discuss the opportunities for European collaboration in the field of AI. They will explore the potential for Europe to be an attractive and leading research destination for AI.  This international virtual interactive event took place on 7 October 12pm BST and lasted for approximately 60 minutes. For an overview of the main points of discussion at the event, read this summary note (PDF).You can read more about the Society’s international engagement on AI, including previous activities on European collaboration in AI.

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Online

Conservative Party Conference

This event is jointly hosted by the UK National Academies; the Royal Society, the British Academy, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Medical Sciences. 

Monday 05 October 2020

10/05/2020

10/05/2020

Researchers and innovators, including Fellows of the National Academies and people we fund, are working together across the globe to help us better understand COVID-19 and discover the best ways to treat, live with and ultimately to stop the virus. Join us to hear from researchers and innovators working to better understand COVID-19 and develop innovations and interventions to stop its spread. Panel: Tom Whipple, Science Editor at the Times and Sunday Times (Chair) Amanda Solloway MP, Minister for Science, Research and Innovation Professor Dame Linda Partridge DBE FRS Dr Shaun Fitzgerald FREng Professor Melinda Mills FBA Professor Dame Anne Johnson FMedSciThe event is a fringe meeting of the Conservative Party Conference. To join the event, click here. Closed captions will be available.  

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Online

Liberal Democrat Party Conference

This event is jointly hosted by the UK National Academies; the Royal Society, the British Academy, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Medical Sciences.

Friday 25 September 2020

09/25/2020

09/25/2020

Researchers and innovators, including Fellows of the National Academies and people we fund, are working together across the globe to help us better understand COVID-19 and discover the best ways to treat, live with and ultimately to stop the virus.Join us to hear from researchers and innovators working to better understand COVID-19 and develop innovations and interventions to stop its spread. Panel: Tom Whipple, Science Editor at the Times and Sunday Times (Chair) Munira Wilson MP, Spokesperson for Health, Wellbeing and Social Care Professor Dame Linda Partridge DBE FRS Dr Shaun Fitzgerald FREng Professor Melinda Mills FBA Professor Peter Openshaw FMedSciThe event is a fringe meeting of the Liberal Democrat Party Conference. For more information on the Conference or to sign up, click here.

Free Event

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No series available.

Labour Party Connected Conference: Ask the experts: Coronavirus

This event is jointly hosted by the UK National Academies; the Royal Society, the British Academy, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Medical Sciences.

Monday 21 September 2020

09/21/2020

09/21/2020

Researchers and innovators, including Fellows of the National Academies and people we fund, are working together across the globe to help us better understand COVID-19 and discover the best ways to treat, live with and ultimately to stop the virus. Join us to hear from researchers and innovators working to better understand COVID-19 and develop innovations and interventions to stop its spread. Panel: Tom Whipple, Science Editor at the Times and Sunday Times (Chair) Chi Onwurah MP, Shadow Minister, Digital, Science & Tech Professor Dame Linda Partridge DBE FRS Dr Shaun Fitzgerald FREng Professor Melinda Mills FBA Prof Dame Anne Johnson DBE MD FMedSciThe event is a fringe meeting of the Labour Party Connected Conference. For more information on the Connected Conference or to sign up, click here. 

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Open House

Open House

A chance to explore the history and architectural highlights of Carlton House Terrace, the home of the UK’s national academy of science from the comfort of your own home.

19 – 20 September 2020

09/19/2020

09/20/2020

Over the weekend, visitors are invited to discover the secrets of the Grade I listed, Nash-designed town houses that are home to the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence. Uncover some of the countless treasures behind the virtual doors of 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, including portraits of Royal Society Fellows dating back to the 1600s, an ornate mother-of-pearl inlay ceiling, and other highlights of the building.For the Open House weekend only, explore our curated collection of digital resources and take a virtual tour around the building.All Open House content will be available here on 19 and 20 September. Make sure you follow us on Twitter @royalsociety or Facebook @theroyalsociety for updates and to be notified when content is live. What is Open House?Open House is a simple but powerful concept: hundreds of great buildings of all types and periods open up their doors to all, completely without charge. Open House London looks a little different this year, with many online only programmes. For more information about other Open House programming visit the Open House website.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

Free Event

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Summer Science Exhibition

Summer Science Online: Ask the SpaceXperts

Part of Summer Science Online  – the Royal Society’s free digital programme of talks, quizzes and videos celebrating cutting-edge and historic science.

Friday 17 July 2020

07/17/2020

07/17/2020

What are black holes? Are we alone in the Universe? How do rockets work? Our live Q&A was your chance to quiz our collection of space experts as we were joined by exhibitors from previous years to help us explore the answers to some of the biggest questions about the Universe.Questions were collected on the day using #RSAskTheSpaceXperts. Exhibit groups joining us from previous years included:From 2pm, A message from afar: Planets beyond our solar system; Humanity within a vast Universe; Extra-terrestrial intelligence; and more.From 2.40pm, Galaxy makers – how do you build a galaxy?: What galaxies are made of; How galaxies are formed; Supermassive black holes; and more.And Gaia: one billion stars in 3D: The Milky Way; Stars and planets; Astronomy; and more.From 3.20pm, Living on the Moon: Finding water and living on the Moon; Modern lunar space missions; How the Moon was formed; and more.

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Summer Science Exhibition

Summer Science Online: The big Summer Science quiz

Part of Summer Science Online  – the Royal Society’s free digital programme of talks, quizzes and videos celebrating cutting-edge and historic science.

Monday 13 July 2020

07/13/2020

07/13/2020

Our big family-friendly online quiz evening ran with a host of special guests and Fellows of the Royal Society pitching questions on their favourite topics. With rounds on movies, space, the elements and more, get your household or an online team together, grab a pen and paper and go for quiz glory. You can catch up on the event on our YouTube channel.The quiz content has something for all ages – the questions are generally suitable for an audience aged 12+, but there will also be a round, hosted by Konnie Huq, aimed specifically at younger quizzers.Hosted by comedian and scientist Dr Steve Cross, with special guests including:  Physicist and television presenter Professor Brian Cox Geneticist, author and broadcaster Dr Adam Rutherford Space scientist and educator Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock Chemist and YouTuber Professor Martyn Poliakoff Children’s author and television presenter Konnie Huq The Natural History Museum, the Royal Institution and the Royal Society

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Summer Science Online

We’re moving Summer Science online, with a free digital programme of talks, quizzes and videos celebrating cutting-edge and historic science.

13 – 17 July 2020

07/13/2020

07/17/2020

With a packed programme of thought-provoking talks, jaw-dropping demonstrations and entertaining performances alongside 21 exhibits of hands-on science and technology, there’s something for all ages.A special evening opening of the exhibition will be held on Tuesday 7 July 2020 for adults only, with additional talks and workshops in a relaxed atmosphere. Head on over after work, grab a drink and explore the future. Families can explore the exhibition at their own pace during the weekend, with a dedicated children’s area in the cafe for younger members and exciting shows for all ages. Sign up to our newsletter to be the first to know when we announce our full programme of exhibits and events.Attending this event  Free and open to all No registration requiredMore information about the Summer Science Exhibition coming soon. For general enquiries, please contact exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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International

Climate change and innovative paths to a sustainable future – POSTPONED

This lecture is postponed. More details to follow. International lecture given by Professor Steven Chu ForMemRS, winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics and former United States Secretary of Energy.

Monday 22 June 2020

06/22/2020

06/22/2020

The multiple industrial and agricultural revolutions have profoundly transformed the world. However,  the unintended consequence of these revolutions is that  we are changing the climate of Earth. Alarming new data on climate change will be presented that indicates that the Earth’s climate is more sensitive than previously thought will be briefly presented. In addition to the climate risks, we face many challenges how to provide enough clean energy, water, air and food of a world of 7.7 billion people and likely to grow to 11 billion by 2100. The majority of the talk will discuss potential solutions that could provide a path to a sustainable and prosperous future. How we can transition from where we are heading to where we need to be within 50 years is arguably the most pressing set of issues that science, invention and innovations needs to address.The international lecture will be webcast live.Professor Steven Chu is an innovative physicist who has developed methods to cool then trap individual atoms and biomolecules using laser light. Professor Chu received the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics for this important advance, served as US Secretary of Energy from 2009 to 2013, and has devoted his career to finding solutions to energy and climate challenges.Attending the eventThis lecture is postponed. More details to follow. Enquiries: contact the Events team

Free Event

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Prize Lecture

Shining a light on brain cells – POSTPONED

This lecture is postponed. More details to follow.Ed Boyden is Y. Eva Tan Professor in Neurotechnology at MIT, associate professor of Biological Engineering and Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT’s Media Lab and…

Tuesday 09 June 2020

06/09/2020

06/09/2020

Professor Boyden’s discoveries in the emerging field of neurotechnology have revolutionised the way we analyse and repair the brain. In his Croonian Lecture, he will discuss two such technologies.The first is expansion microscopy, which enables complex biological systems to be imaged to nanoscale precision; the second is optogenetics, with which individual neurons and pathways can be turned on or off using a beam of light.The prize lecture will be webcast live and the video recording of the event will be available shortly after the event.Attending this eventThis lecture is postponed. More details to follow.The awardThe Croonian Lecture series began in 1738 and is the premier lecture in biological sciences.Professor Edward Boyden was awarded The Croonian Medal and Lecture 2020 for his inventions that expand our understanding of the brain and allow therapeutic development including the co-invention of optogenetics, a technology that has revolutionised neurobiology.Enquiries: contact the Events team

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Festival Event

The next big thing

Royal Society Research Fellows Rachel Lowe, Charlotte Lloyd and Myriam Chimen discuss the next big thing.

Friday 29 May 2020

05/29/2020

05/29/2020

From the methods to track and reduce ocean microplastics, to the effect of the immune system in ageing to understanding how environmental factors can determine the risk of disease transmission, three Royal Society Research Fellows discuss their work at the forefront of science with xxxxxxxxx. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

Free Event

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Prize Lecture

Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar 2019 prize lecture – POSTPONED

This lecture is postponed. More details to follow.Professor Simon Schaffer was awarded the Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Medal and Lecture 2019 for his contributions to the communication of the history of science. 

Tuesday 12 May 2020

05/12/2020

05/12/2020

On Tuesday 12 May, Professor Schaffer will present his prize lecture at Carlton House Terrace in London.Full details of the lecture title and topic will be released in 2020.This event is the 2019 Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Prize Lecture, which is awarded to Professor Simon Schaffer for transforming understanding of the intellectual history of experimental science and his excellent communication of science in all media.Attending this eventThis lecture is postponed. More details to follow.

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar 2019 prize lecture – POSTPONED

This lecture is postponed. More details to follow.Professor Simon Schaffer was awarded the Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Medal and Lecture 2019 for his contributions to the communication of the history of science. 

Tuesday 12 May 2020

05/12/2020

05/12/2020

On Tuesday 12 May, Professor Schaffer will present his prize lecture at Carlton House Terrace in London.Full details of the lecture title and topic will be released in 2020.This event is the 2019 Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Prize Lecture, which is awarded to Professor Simon Schaffer for transforming understanding of the intellectual history of experimental science and his excellent communication of science in all media.Attending this eventThis lecture is postponed. More details to follow.

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PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

The art of sleep – POSTPONED

This lecture is postponed. More details to follow.Professor of Circadian Neuroscience Russell Foster and artist Tom Hammick discuss the effect of different sleep patterns and nocturnal working on an artist’s…

Friday 27 March 2020

03/27/2020

03/27/2020

Léon Spilliaert’s battle with insomnia played a key part in the production of his mysterious night-time scenes created following his nocturnal walks around his hometown of Ostend. Taking Spilliaert’s work as a starting point, Professor Russell Foster and artist Tom Hammick will examine how changes to our natural circadian rhythm, our sleep/wake cycle, and exposure to lightness and darkness may affect the mind and discuss how nocturnal working practices can influence an artist’s creativity and inspiration.Russell Grant Foster, CBE FMedSci FRS is a British professor of circadian neuroscience, the Director of the Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology and the Head of the Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute.Tom Hammick is a British painter and printmaker who has work in many major public and private collections and was the winner of the V&A Prize at the International Print Biennale in 2016. He curated the exhibition Towards Night at Towner Art Gallery, Eastbourne in 2016, which featured over 60 artists, from Edvard Munch to Louise Bourgeois. His most recent exhibition of his own work, Night Animals was at Flowers Gallery in 2019.Attending this eventThis lecture is postponed. More details to follow.For non-ticket enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.In this series of events, organised in partnership between the Royal Academy of Arts and The Royal Society, we examine the creative connections between art and science.

London

Free Event

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You And The Planet

You and the planet: family festival

Join us for a celebration of You and the Planet; the Royal Society’s event series exploring global environmental issues across the UK and asking how science can look after the planet and life on it.

Saturday 21 March 2020

03/21/2020

03/21/2020

Talk to scientists at the frontline of understanding and protecting our changing world, including the Museum’s own team, future leaders in African research, and scientists of tomorrow from schools across the UK. Extract some plant DNA, find out what’s valuable about your urine, and what lives beneath your feet. Then look to the future with the final discussion on what the next steps for us and the planet are.Full programme to follow shortly. 

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

You And The Planet

You and the planet: family festival – POSTPONED

This event is postponed. More details to follow. Join us for a celebration of You and the Planet; the Royal Society’s event series exploring global environmental issues across the UK and asking how science can look…

Saturday 21 March 2020

03/21/2020

03/21/2020

Talk to scientists at the frontline of understanding and protecting our changing world, including the Museum’s own team, future leaders in African research, and scientists of tomorrow from schools across the UK. Extract some plant DNA, find out what’s valuable about your urine, and what lives beneath your feet. Then look to the future with the final discussion on what the next steps for us and the planet are.If you have any questions, please reach out to the Events team. 

Free Event

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Panel Discussion

Science on the frontline

Conflict zones and areas of hostility and instability are inherently dangerous and pose significant threat to life, which means conducting scientific research in these places can be challenging, if not impossible.…

Wednesday 11 March 2020

03/11/2020

03/11/2020

Meet the experts working on the frontline in some of the world’s most hostile territories and discover the importance of exploring these places to learn more about the world we live in and the things that shape our planet and ourselves. This event is a part of British Science Week 2020.SpeakersThe panel will be hosted by evolutionary biologist Professor Mark Pagel FRS who will be joined by:  Ella Al-Shamahi, National Geographic Explorer, palaeoanthropologist and TV presenter Professor Graeme Barker CBE FBA, Disney Professor of Archaeology Emeritus at the University of Cambridge, Senior Research Fellow in the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, and Professorial Fellow at St John’s College, University of Cambridge Dr Leona Vaughn, Derby Fellow, University of LiverpoolAttending this event Free to attend No registration required, seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Live subtitles will be available. Travel and accessibility information

Free Event

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Prize Lecture

Ripples from the Dark Side of the Universe – a bright future ahead

Bakerian Lecture 2020 given by Sir James Hough OBE FRS

Tuesday 10 March 2020

03/10/2020

03/10/2020

In this talk Sir James will discuss progress in the field of gravitational wave detection, from the first days of the aluminium bar detectors to the present time, where the laser interferometer detectors Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo have allowed gravitational waves to be detected and are opening up a new field of gravitational multi-messenger astrophysics with a number of ground breaking discoveries. Many experimental challenges had to be overcome and new challenges are presenting themselves as we look to further enhance the performance of ground based detectors and look to lower frequencies with the space based detector LISA. Attending this eventThis event has taken place. The awardThe Bakerian Lecture series began in 1775 and is the premier lecture in physical sciences.Sir James Hough OBE FRS was awarded the Bakerian Medal and Lecture 2020 for his world-leading work on suspensions systems for the test masses used in laser interferometry, pivotal to the successful detection of gravitational waves.Enquiries: contact the Events team

Free Event

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You And The Planet

You and the planet: biodiversity

Join our panel at the Eden Project to discover how human activity affects the variety of life on Earth.    

Wednesday 26 February 2020

02/26/2020

02/26/2020

Broadcaster Gillian Burke hosts a discussion to get to the bottom of your questions about biodiversity, what it means and why it’s so vital to have variety in species.Recent studies have shown that the populations of mammals, birds, fish, reptiles and amphibians have declined by 60% since 1970 and a fifth of the Amazon has disappeared in just 50 years. In the UK, the abundance of wildlife is falling, with the steepest losses happening in the last 10 years.  What do these losses mean for humanity? What are the benefits of restoring nature and biodiversity? How can human societies flourish alongside thriving natural ecosystems?Get involved by submitting your question to the panel when registering.This event is part of You and the Planet, a series exploring global environmental issues with world-renowned speakers from science, business, politics and more.Watch the series live on YouTube and join the conversation at #YouAndThePlanet.SpeakersSebsebe Demissew is Professor of Plant Systematics and Biodiversity in Addis Ababa University and Executive Director of the Gullele Botanic Garden in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. He served as the Leader of the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea between 1996 until its completion in 2009 in collaboration with Dr Inga Hedberg from the University of Uppsala in which 6000 species with 10% endemics are documented; the project involved 91 scientists from 17 countries. It is one of the few completed Floras in Africa. He is a Foreign Member of the Royal Society won the 2016 Kew International Medal.Georgina Mace is Professor of Biodiversity and Ecosystems and was the founding Director of the UCL Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, which she led between 2012 and 2018. Her research interests are in measuring the trends and consequences of biodiversity loss and ecosystem change. She was the winner of the 2007 International Cosmos Prize, the 2016 Heineken Prize for Environmental Science and the BBVA Frontiers of Knowledge Award for Ecology and Conservation Biology. From 2012 to 2018 she was a member of the UK Government’s Natural Capital Committee and in 2018 she joined the Adaptation Committee of the UK Climate Change Committee.Tim Smit is Executive Vice-Chair, and Co-founder of the Eden Project near St Austell in Cornwall. He ‘discovered’ and then restored ‘The Lost Gardens of Heligan’ with John Nelson, which is now one of the UK’s best loved gardens having been named ‘Garden of the Year’ by BBC Countryfile Awards (Mar 2018).  Tim’s book ‘The Lost Gardens of Heligan’ won Book of the Year in 1997. He has received a variety of national awards including The Royal Society of Arts Albert Medal (2003). In June 2012 he was appointed Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (KBE) by Her Majesty the Queen. He lives in Cornwall and in his free time he enjoys reading, film, music and art. Tim is also Executive Co-Chair for Eden Project International which aims to have an Eden Project on every habited continent by 2025.Lindsay Turnbull is an Associate Professor in plant sciences at the University of Oxford where she leads the plant ecology research group. She is a Trustee of the Seychelles Island Foundation, a charitable organisation that manages and protects the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Aldabra Atoll and the Vallée de Mai. She co-led the Aldabra Clean-Up Project, which aimed to rid the atoll of plastic pollution through volunteer teams of Oxford Graduates and young people from the Seychelles. NOTE: This event will be broadcast live on our YouTube channel Attending this event Free to attend, tickets required  Please register for tickets on Eventbrite Doors to the talk open at 6.00pm and seating is unreserved Live subtitles will be available Free tea and coffee will be available on the evening. We strongly encourage you to bring your own reusable cup. British Sign Language interpretation will be available on request. Please let the Events team know if you require it at least two weeks before the event.Please note; due to the nature of free ticketing, booking a ticket does not guarantee entry to the hall. Please arrive early to secure your seat.Please direct questions or queries to events@royalsociety.org

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You And The Planet

You and the planet: biodiversity

Our panel at the Eden Project discussed how human activity affects the variety of life on Earth.    

Wednesday 26 February 2020

02/26/2020

02/26/2020

Broadcaster Gillian Burke hosted a discussion to get to the bottom of your questions about biodiversity, what it means and why it’s so vital to have variety in species.Recent studies have shown that the populations of mammals, birds, fish, reptiles and amphibians have declined by 60% since 1970 and a fifth of the Amazon has disappeared in just 50 years. In the UK, the abundance of wildlife is falling, with the steepest losses happening in the last 10 years.  What do these losses mean for humanity? What are the benefits of restoring nature and biodiversity? How can human societies flourish alongside thriving natural ecosystems? This event is part of You and the Planet, a series exploring global environmental issues with world-renowned speakers from science, business, politics and more.Watch the series live on YouTube and join the conversation at #YouAndThePlanet.SpeakersSebsebe Demissew is Professor of Plant Systematics and Biodiversity in Addis Ababa University and Executive Director of the Gullele Botanic Garden in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. He served as the Leader of the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea between 1996 until its completion in 2009 in collaboration with Dr Inga Hedberg from the University of Uppsala in which 6000 species with 10% endemics are documented; the project involved 91 scientists from 17 countries. It is one of the few completed Floras in Africa. He is a Foreign Member of the Royal Society won the 2016 Kew International Medal.Georgina Mace is Professor of Biodiversity and Ecosystems and was the founding Director of the UCL Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, which she led between 2012 and 2018. Her research interests are in measuring the trends and consequences of biodiversity loss and ecosystem change. She was the winner of the 2007 International Cosmos Prize, the 2016 Heineken Prize for Environmental Science and the BBVA Frontiers of Knowledge Award for Ecology and Conservation Biology. From 2012 to 2018 she was a member of the UK Government’s Natural Capital Committee and in 2018 she joined the Adaptation Committee of the UK Climate Change Committee.Tim Smit is Executive Vice-Chair, and Co-founder of the Eden Project near St Austell in Cornwall. He ‘discovered’ and then restored ‘The Lost Gardens of Heligan’ with John Nelson, which is now one of the UK’s best loved gardens having been named ‘Garden of the Year’ by BBC Countryfile Awards (Mar 2018).  Tim’s book ‘The Lost Gardens of Heligan’ won Book of the Year in 1997. He has received a variety of national awards including The Royal Society of Arts Albert Medal (2003). In June 2012 he was appointed Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (KBE) by Her Majesty the Queen. He lives in Cornwall and in his free time he enjoys reading, film, music and art. Tim is also Executive Co-Chair for Eden Project International which aims to have an Eden Project on every habited continent by 2025.Lindsay Turnbull is an Associate Professor in plant sciences at the University of Oxford where she leads the plant ecology research group. She is a Trustee of the Seychelles Island Foundation, a charitable organisation that manages and protects the UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Aldabra Atoll and the Vallée de Mai. She co-led the Aldabra Clean-Up Project, which aimed to rid the atoll of plastic pollution through volunteer teams of Oxford Graduates and young people from the Seychelles. 

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Festival Event

Clearing the Air

In March 2014 sustainability journalist Tim Smedley helped his wife and newborn baby out of St Mary’s Hospital in Paddington, unaware that he was taking them along one of the most polluted roads, in one of Europe’s…

Saturday 22 February 2020

02/22/2020

02/22/2020

Tim tells the full story of air pollution: what it is, which pollutants are harmful, where they come from and, most importantly, what we can do about them. Amidst terrifying statistics Tim uncovers the hope that remains for the planet.This event is taking place at the 2020 Northern Ireland Science Festival.Clearing the Air: The Beginning and End of Air Pollution was shortlisted for the 2019 Insight Investment Science Book Prize. Attending this event Ticket is required £3 per ticket, plus a 30p booking fee per ticket Suitable for 14+ Tickets are available from the Festival websiteFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org. 

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Festival Event

Who do we think we are?

Ancient DNA has become a vital archaeological tool, enabling genetic post-coding of discoveries of human remains and helping to rewrite the history of Europeans.

Friday 21 February 2020

02/21/2020

02/21/2020

Professor Dan Bradley (Trinity College Dublin) will explain how human genetics can be used to understand the patterns and processes underlying genetic variations which exist on our island.This event is taking place at the 2020 Northern Ireland Science Festival in partnership with Causeway Coast and Glens Borough Council.Attending this event Booking is required Suitable for 18+ Tickets are available from the Festival websiteFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org. 

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Festival Event

What can Big Data do for Northern Ireland?

What are the latest developments in data, artificial intelligence and digital technologies in Northern Ireland, and how can we make sure they benefit as many people as possible?

Wednesday 19 February 2020

02/19/2020

02/19/2020

Sir John McCanny CBE FRS FREng hosts a panel of experts from business, science and policy to discover local examples of innovative practice and find out how they can contribute to a thriving and prosperous region.Panel Patricia O’Hagan – CEO, Core Systems Adrian Johnston – Director of Operations, Digital Catapult NI Professor Maire O’Neill FREng – Professor of Information Security, Queen’s University BelfastThis event is taking place at the 2020 Northern Ireland Science Festival and is part of the Innovate UK Grand Challenges series. Attending this event Booking is required Suitable for 18+ Tickets are available from the Festival websiteFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org. 

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Prize Lecture

The elements of chemistry

Join Professor Sir Martyn Poliakoff for a whirlwind tour among the chemical elements that have played an important role in his scientific career and have led him to champion greener more sustainable ways of making…

Monday 17 February 2020

02/17/2020

02/17/2020

Sir Martyn is a professor of chemistry who works at the interface of chemistry and engineering, a role that has led him to work with more than half of the stable elements of the Periodic Table.   In this lecture, Sir Martyn will show how the relationship between a chemist and the elements is more complicated and more personal than you might imagine. He will describe how his involvement with different elements has been very varied. Some elements he has known a long time while others have passed fleetingly through his lab in Nottingham, but all have played important roles in his work.This event is the 2019 Michael Faraday Prize and Lecture, which is awarded to a practicing scientist or engineering who demonstrates excellence in the field of scientific public engagement.Attending this event Free to attend No registration required, seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis This event may be popular and entry cannot be guaranteed Live subtitles and BSL interpretation will be provided for this event Please note, this event will be filmed as a livestream broadcast. You can watch the livestream on this page when the event starts Travel and accessibility informationFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

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International

Generating high-intensity, ultrashort optical pulses

International lecture given by Professor Donna Strickland

Thursday 13 February 2020

02/13/2020

02/13/2020

With the invention of lasers, the intensity of a light wave was increased by orders of magnitude over what had been achieved with a light bulb or sunlight. This much higher intensity led to new phenomena being observed, such as violet light coming out when red light went into the material. After Professor Gérard Mourou and Professor Strickland developed chirped pulse amplification, also known as CPA, the intensity again increased by more than a factor of 1,000 and it once again made new types of interactions possible between light and matter. They developed a laser that could deliver short pulses of light that knocked the electrons off their atoms. This new understanding of laser-matter interactions, led to the development of new machining techniques that are used in laser eye surgery or micromachining of glass used in cell phones. Professor Strickland works at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Waterloo, Canada. She was one of the recipients of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2018 for developing chirped pulse amplification, with Gérard Mourou. This research paved the way for one of the most intense laser pulses ever created, and has many applications in medicine and technology.Attending the eventThis event has taken place.Enquiries: contact the Events team

Free Event

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History Of Science

Royal Society lates

Join us for a evening celebrating science fiction and the Royal Society. Discover the remarkable scientific artefacts and stories housed in its extensive, world-class archives.

Monday 10 February 2020

02/10/2020

02/10/2020

This year’s theme, science fiction, is inspired by the many extraordinary scientific advances authors of the past only dreamed about, and the futures that scientists of the past predicted. You will be treated to a special performance from a spectacular new science-themed dance piece, Sakura, produced by Sisters Grimm. Hear the story behind this collaboration of science and art as told by Professor Nicky Clayton FRS (University of Cambridge and Scientist in Residence at Rambert) and Mark Baldwin OBE (former artistic director at Rambert).The programme will include talks on science in Victorian fairy tales, astronomy in the 19th century, and Michael Faraday’s Christmas candle lecture, as well as festive activities such as printmaking greeting cards and mince pie molecular gastronomy.You will also have the unique opportunity to explore the beautiful Carlton House Terrace in all its glory by candlelight.Attending the event Over-18s only We are operating a Challenge 25 policy on the door and you may be required to show a valid form of ID to enter the event Free to attend No registration required Doors will open at 18:30 and admission will be on a first-come, first-served basis This event may be popular and entry cannot be guaranteed Travel and accessibility informationThe Royal Society’s aim is to make its events accessible to as many people as possible. This is why our events are free and offered on a first-come, first-served basis.

London

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History Of Science

Royal Society lates: science fiction

Catch up on an evening celebrating science fiction and the Royal Society. Discover the remarkable scientific artefacts and stories housed in our extensive, world-class archives. Science has long inspired writers to…

Monday 10 February 2020

02/10/2020

02/10/2020

In case you missed itYou can listen to audio recordings of the following talks by clicking the links below.Beyond Discworld.mp3Elois vs Morlocks: Darwinism and Victorian Sci-Fi.mp3The science of Frankenstein.mp3Waves, particles and pronouns.mp3 Events and activitiesBeyond Discworld19:30Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series has inspired authors, screen writers, and individuals to create their own stories and their own fictional worlds. But how can a flat planet balanced on the backs of elephants, who stand on the back of a giant turtle drifting through space link to science?Join BBC CrowdScience’s Marnie Chesterton as she quizzes the man behind the Science of Discworld, mathematician and Honorary Wizard of the Unseen University, Professor Ian Stewart FRS, and hear about where he thinks science fits in with fiction.Listen to an audio recording of this talk (Beyond Discworld.mp3).

London

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You And The Planet

You and the planet: food

Join our panel in Gateshead to discover how the food we eat affects the natural world.

Thursday 23 January 2020

01/23/2020

01/23/2020

Chef and broadcaster Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall hosts a discussion to get to the bottom of your questions about the relationship between our food and our planet.World food production grew from 1.84 billion tonnes in 1961 to 4.38 billion tonnes in 2007, yet people still go hungry.How can we feed the world sustainably and equitably while protecting nature? Would eating less red meat make a real difference? What is the future of farming? Get involved by submitting your question to the panel when reserving a seat online, or come along beforehand to meet researchers from Newcastle University, who will be demonstrating how their work is addressing some of the biggest challenges in our global food system. This event is part of You and the Planet, a series exploring global environmental issues with world-renowned speakers from science, business, politics and more. Catch up on the series on YouTube and join the conversation at #YouAndThePlanet.Speakers Gordon Conway,  Professor of International Development at Imperial College London, is an applied ecologist with a focus on sustainable agricultural development in Africa. He is head of the UK hub of the Malabo-Montpellier Panel, a group of African and European agriculturalists who partner with IFPRI (The International Food Policy Research Institute) in Senegal and the University of Bonn to develop agricultural policy for African governments and NGOs. He also heads a new grant from the Rockefeller Foundation focusing on creating Healthy Diets worldwide. His most recent book is ‘Food for All in Africa’.Corinna Hawkes is Director of the Centre for Food Policy at City, University of London.  Her work aims to support the design and delivery of policies that effectively and equitably improve the quality of diets locally, nationally and internationally. A regular advisor to governments, international agencies and NGOs, her work is concerned with providing solutions to all forms of diet-related ill-health, including obesity, malnutrition and diet-related non-communicable diseases. Between 2014-18, Professor Hawkes was Co-Chair of the Global Nutrition Report, and in 2018 she was appointed Vice-Chair of London’s Child Obesity Taskforce by the Mayor of London.  She is also a Distinguished Fellow at The George Institute for Global Health.Dr Juha-Pekka Pitkänen, Chief Technology Officer and co-founder of Finnish start-up company Solar Foods Ltd. Solar Foods aims to bring to the market a radically new pure protein which is produced without agriculture or requirement for arable land. The process uses a microorganism which is grown in fermenter tanks similar to those in breweries using carbon dioxide, renewable electricity, water and minerals as raw materials. This closed process enables efficient food production regardless of climate, weather or quality of soil. No pesticides or irrigation is needed, avoiding environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere and water pollution, eutrophication or even water shortage. Prior to co-founding Solar Foods, Dr. Pitkänen was a principal scientist in bioprocess engineering at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.NOTE: This event will be broadcast live on our YouTube channel.DemonstrationsFrom 5pm, enjoy a refreshment in the bar area and meet scientists who will be showcasing how their work is addressing some of the biggest challenges facing our global food system.What is the carbon footprint of your trolley? Newcastle UniversityShopping carts at the ready in this “Supermarket Sweep” style challenge as you attempt to guess the carbon footprint of certain items in your weekly food shop.The importance of bee-ing healthy Institute for Agri-food Research and Innovation, Newcastle UniversityMeet the bumblebees at the forefront of crop and wild plant pollination and discover why scientists are striving to keep them healthy and safe by protecting them from pests and disease. The future of farmingFIELD research collaborationDiscover your perceptions of the past, present and future of farming and explore the unlimited potential for farming of the future.We’re root-ing for youDurham UnviersityPut your root related knowledge to the test and compete for the vegetable expert crown. Please contact events@royalsociety.org with any questions or queries. 

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No series available.

Life versus mathematics: lecture by Fields Medal winner Caucher Birkar FRS

Tuesday 21 January 2020

01/21/2020

01/21/2020

Originally from Kurdistan province, Iran, Professor Caucher Birkar FRS will speak about his life and his journey to becoming one of the world’s leading mathematicians, as well as the role of maths in people’s lives. Professor Birkar won the 2018 Fields Medal.The lecture will be of interest to anyone interested in maths, human rights and the experiences of scientists who have sought refuge in the UK.Interesting artefacts and stories from other scientists who have sought refuge in the UK will also be on display, reflecting the huge and varied contributions that this group have made to science and society in the UK. Please contact international@royalsociety.org for further details.

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Prize Lecture

Love, smell and memory: exploring the brain circuits for learned and innate behaviour

Francis Crick Lecture 2019 given by Dr Gregory Jefferis

Thursday 16 January 2020

01/16/2020

01/16/2020

How does the genome encode behaviour through the development of the nervous system? What makes male and female brains different? What is different about brain circuits for learned and unlearned behaviour?Gregory Jefferis will provide answers to these questions from his group’s work on the fruit fly, Drosophila. They are using the latest technologies to study animal behaviour and to monitor and perturb neurons. They are also using the new science of connectomics to map the neuronal wiring diagram of this tiny but sophisticated brain. Together this is revealing some of the core logic by which brains process information and control behaviour, principles that are likely shared all the way to humans. The awardThe Francis Crick Medal and Lecture is awarded annually in any field in the biological sciences. Preference is given to genetics, molecular biology and neurobiology, the general areas in which Francis Crick worked, and to fundamental theoretical work, which was the hallmark of Crick’s science.The Francis Crick Medal and Lecture 2019 is awarded to Dr Gregory Jefferis for his fundamental discoveries concerning the development and functional logic of sensory information processing.Enquiries: contact the Events team

Free Event

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Prize Lecture

Towards the genomic footprints of life

Milner Award Lecture 2019 given by Professor Eugene Myers.

Monday 02 December 2019

12/02/2019

12/02/2019

We are about to enter an era of DNA technology where one can determine the genome sequence of any living animal or plant with near perfect fidelity for €1,000 or less. Already there are nascent projects such as the Vertebrate Genome Project (VGP) whose goal is to sequence every one of the more than 70,000 species of vertebrates currently extant on our planet. As such, this ability will revolutionize ecology, evolution, and conservation science and effectively mark the beginning of a new exploration of the natural world.The lecture started with a brief review of the history of DNA sequencing technology and the computational problems involved in interpreting the data so produced. This history begins with Fred Sanger’s sequencing of the virus “lambda” in 1980, continues to the sequencing of the Human genome in 2000, and culminates in the present with an introduction to the transformative technologies alluded to above. However, the primary hurdle in this future vision is actually computational and the issues and potential approaches to addressing them were discussed. Professor Myers presented several recent findings enabled by having the genome sequences of related species and concluded with a prospectus of what could be discovered in the future.The awardThe Royal Society Milner Award and Lecture is awarded annually for outstanding achievement in computer science by a European researcher or researcher who has had European residency for 12 months or more.The Royal Society Milner Award and Lecture is kindly supported by Microsoft Research.Professor Eugene Myers was awarded the 2019 Royal Society Milner Award and Lecture for his development of computational techniques that have brought genome sequencing into everyday use, underpinned key biological sequencing tools, and made large scale analysis of biological images practical.Enquiries: contact the Events team

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Conference

Educational Research Forum: Developing a future agenda for educational research

Tuesday 26 November 2019

11/26/2019

11/26/2019

Join the upcoming Educational Research Forum, hosted by the Royal Society and the British Academy, which will bring together educational researchers, policy makers and teaching practitioners to talk about shared challenges and opportunities in educational research.This event aims to take forward one of the Harnessing Educational Research report’s key recommendations: ‘improving collaboration’ in the ecosystem. Published in 2018, the report assessed the current state of educational research about formal education up to the age of 18 in the UK and how it is used in the broader education ecosystem.This exciting event aims to: Bring together educational researchers, policy makers and teaching practitioners to talk about shared challenges and opportunities in educational research; Move towards a shared future research agenda which is jointly owned by the key communities in the ecosystem; Harness expertise and enthusiasm across communities to set in motion a step change in the way educational research is planned, coordinated and used in the UK; Create a lasting legacy to enable future collaboration between educational researchers, policy makers and teaching practitioners.   Attending this eventAttendance is by invitation only. Registration has now closed.For further details please contact Kelly Chaplin.   

London

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Cafe Scientifique

Café Scientifique: Random Revolution

Royal Society Research Fellow Rob Young and designer Salomé Bazin explore the importance of randomness in our daily lives, and how the predictability of both humans and computers alike is a problem.

Monday 25 November 2019

11/25/2019

11/25/2019

Rob Young is Professor of Quantum Information Processing and is the Director of Lancaster University’s Quantum Technology Centre. He has recently invented a new form of random number generator whose output is based on quantum physics, which is arguably the only true source of randomness in existence.He and Bazin, designer of Random Revolution, will discuss future applications of his work to the important challenge of keeping our digital communications and transactions encrypted and secure.Attending this event Free to attend, registration required  Event taking place in the Fountain Room on the Ground Floor of the Barbican Centre Accessibility informationFor all ticket enquiries please contact tickets@barbican.org.uk, for all other enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.This Café Scientifique is an open scientific discussion. The Cafés are dialogue-based and allow time for discussion between and amongst the audience and the speaker, where you’re encouraged not just to bring an enquiring mind, but your own thoughts and questions.

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Exhibition

Random Revolution

Journey into the quantum world, Random Revolution explores the laws that are governing the internet, our lives and nature.

21 November – 15 December 2019

11/21/2019

12/15/2019

What if our digital landscape was driven by pure randomness?Randomness plays a vital role in the digital networks that make modern life possible. It keeps our communications and financial transactions encrypted and secure, and is central to computer simulations and stock market analysis. Reflecting on technological advancement, Random Revolution explores the laws that are governing the internet, our lives and nature.Powered by the research of Rob Young (Royal Society Research Fellow and Professor at Lancaster University) in collaboration with Cellule studio, Random Revolution is an immersive journey into the quantum world.Attending this event This installation is free and can be found in the Life Rewired Hub on the Ground Floor of the Barbican Centre Accessibility informationFor all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.

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History Of Science

Collecting for charity

Thursday 14 November 2019

11/14/2019

11/14/2019

Baroque musicians 82 Degrees perform a benefit concert to raise awareness of the Coram Foundation for Children in London.The concert is hosted by Collective Wisdom in tribute to the work of Francke, Handel and Coram. The performance includes pieces by Handel, Haydn and Paganini.Download the programme (PDF)About the concertCollective Wisdom is an international network of scholars exploring how and why members of the Royal Society, the Society of Antiquaries of London and the Leopoldina collected specimens of the natural world, art, and archaeology in the 17th and 18th centuries.Part of this work examined the Wunderkammer or Natural History Museum in the Historic Orphanage of the Francke Foundation in Halle, Germany. In 1698, Francke created this global cabinet of curiosities as a teaching tool for the children in his care. His ‘learning-by-doing’ approach included teaching the children to sing for public performance. These ideas greatly influenced Thomas Coram’s vision for his Foundling Hospital.Handel was a native of Halle, had Francke as his teacher, and was familiar with Francke’s use of musical performance to fundraise. Handel’s Messiah was performed in a benefit concert for Coram’s Hospital.Collective Wisdom is funded by a networking grant award from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and project partners include the Royal Society, the Leopoldina, the Society of Antiquaries of London, the Francke Foundation, the University of Lincoln and the University of Oregon.Attending this event Free to attend Doors open at 6.50pm Seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis An optional donation of £10 to Coram’s Programme of Creative Therapies for Children is suggested Travel and accessibility informationThis event follows Collecting and Collections: Digital Lives and Afterlives, a two-day workshop on early modern collections held at the Royal Society.

London

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

History Of Science

Collecting and Collections: Digital Lives and Afterlives

This workshop concerning the afterlives, use and reconstruction of early modern collections is designed to benefit scholars interested in digital humanities.

14 – 15 November 2019

11/14/2019

11/15/2019

We will explore digital approaches to survey collections over time, assisted by the Royal Society-Google Cultural Institute partnership. How can we data-mine and use tools to integrate extant databases? How did the norms of early modern academies, of scientific journal publication, priority of discovery and ‘matters of fact’ shape the organisation of knowledge? How do we consider those early modern models in digital reconstructions of early collecting?This workshop is organised by Collective Wisdom. Collective Wisdom is funded by a networking grant award from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and project partners include the Royal Society, the Leopoldina, the Society of Antiquaries of London, the Francke Foundation, the University of Lincoln and the University of Oregon.Download the conference programme (PDF)Download the speaker abstracts (PDF)Attending this event You must purchase a ticket to attend this event Register and more information on the University of Lincoln website Travel and accessibility information

London

Standard: £100 Concessions/one day: £50

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PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

Rewriting nature versus nurture

The question of whether nature or nurture contributes more to development of individual human behaviour is by no means a new one. In fact, it is a debate that has raged on for centuries, as far back as Ancient Greek…

Thursday 07 November 2019

11/07/2019

11/07/2019

While scientists today largely agree that a complex combination of biological factors, like brain structure and genetics, and environmental factors shape who we are, new advances in the field of developmental neuroscience suggest we should be examining this question within an evolutionary framework.From the brain’s factory settings that have developed over millennia, through genetic adaptations, to the influence of culture and experience, this discussion will explore the role that evolution has played in the development of our innate cognitive capabilities, like rational thinking and conscious reasoning.The panel is hosted by neuroscientist and author Dr Kevin Mitchell and includes: Professor Uta Frith DBE FBA FMedSci FRS, Emeritus Professor of Cognitive Development, University College London Professor Cecilia Heyes FBA, Senior Research Fellow in Theoretical Life Sciences and Professor of Psychology, University of OxfordFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.Rewriting nature versus nurture is part of Berlin Science Week 2019.Attending the event This event is free to attend but advanced registration is essential Seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Travel information Accessibility information

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PAST EVENT

You And The Planet

You and the planet: energy

Wales is home to many important low-carbon energy projects, including Britain’s fastest supply of energy at Electric Mountain, one of the largest off-shore wind farms in the world, and over 120 community energy…

Wednesday 06 November 2019

11/06/2019

11/06/2019

BBC Wales’s Rachael Garside hosted a discussion to find out how the energy we use affects the natural world and discovered promising pathways to a clean, safe and sustainable energy future.This event was part of You and the Planet, a series exploring global environmental issues with world-renowned speakers from science, business, politics and more. Watch the series live on YouTube and join the conversation at #YouAndThePlanet.Julia Brown DBE FREng FRS is an engineer and cross-bench peer in the House of Lords. She is the Vice Chair of the Committee on Climate Change, leading on decarbonising transport, and also chairs the Adaptation Sub-Committee, assessing the UK’s response to the risks of a changing climate. Julia is the Chair of the Carbon Trust and a Non-Executive Director of the Offshore Renewable Energy Catapult. Juliet Davenport OBE is founder and Chief Executive Officer of Good Energy – a renewable energy company with a mission to power a greener, cleaner future together with its customers. Juliet has been an innovator for over 20 years, working on ideas to fight climate change and transform the energy sector for the better. She currently sits on the board of the Renewable Energy Association and Innovate UK and is Vice President of the Energy Institute. Juliet has various scholastic credentials with academic organisations, including University of Wales, Imperial College, Bristol University, Birkbeck and LSE.James Durrant FRS is Professor of Photochemistry in the Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London and Sêr Cymru Solar Professor, College of Engineering University of Swansea. Professor Durrant leads Imperial’s Centre for Plastic Electronics and the Welsh government funded Sêr Cymru Solar initiative. He also founded the UK’s Solar Fuels Network, and was founding Deputy Director of Imperial’s Energy Futures Laboratory. He was elected a Fellow of the Learned Society of Wales in 2016.Rebecca Heaton is Head of Climate Change at Drax, with responsibility for Drax Group’s efforts to mitigate climate change, ensuring that sound science underpins climate change polices and business strategy. She is also responsible for developing sustainability and climate change research programmes. She has a 20 year global career working at the interface between business, science and policy. After an early career in academia, she has held senior roles in a number of large energy companies. She is also a member of the Committee on Climate Change, where her duties include representing Wales.NOTE: This event will be broadcast live on our YouTube channel. Please direct questions or queries to events@royalsociety.org.

Free Event

youandtheplanet pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Nanomaterials from bench to bedside

Rosalind Franklin Lecture 2019 given by Professor Nguyễn Thị Kim Thanh

Tuesday 29 October 2019

10/29/2019

10/29/2019

Michael Faraday synthesised gold nanoparticles back in 1856, so what is new? How could rust, which is magnetic, be used to diagnose and treat diseases such as cancer? How can different shapes of gold nanoparticle such as rods or stars help with killing bacteria on surfaces? Professor Nguyễn spoke about her interdisciplinary and innovative research on the design, synthesis, characterisation, and biofunctionalisation of plasmonic and magnetic nanomaterials for biomedical applications.Attending the eventThis event has taken place.The awardThe Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture is awarded annually and is made to support the promotion of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.The Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture 2019 is awarded to Professor Nguyễn Thị Kim Thanh for her achievements in the field of nanomaterials and her impactful project proposal.Enquiries: contact the Events team

Free Event

chemistry engineering prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Nanomaterials from bench to bedside

Rosalind Franklin Lecture 2019 given by Professor Nguyễn Thị Kim Thanh

Tuesday 29 October 2019

10/29/2019

10/29/2019

Michael Faraday synthesised gold nanoparticles back in 1856, so what is new? How could rust, which is magnetic, be used to diagnose and treat diseases such as cancer? How can different shapes of gold nanoparticle such as rods or stars help with killing bacteria on surfaces? Come to find out about Professor Nguyễn’s interdisciplinary and innovative research on the design, synthesis, characterisation, and biofunctionalisation of plasmonic and magnetic nanomaterials for biomedical applications.The prize lecture will be webcast live and the video recording of the event will be available shortly after the event.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Doors open from 6pm and seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis This event may be popular and entry cannot be guaranteed Live subtitles will be available British Sign Language interpretation will be available on request. Please let the Events team know if you plan to attend at least two weeks prior to the event Travel and accessibility informationThe awardThe Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture is awarded annually and is made to support the promotion of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.The Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture 2019 is awarded to Professor Nguyễn Thị Kim Thanh for her achievements in the field of nanomaterials and her impactful project proposal.Enquiries: contact the Events team

Free Event

chemistry engineering prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

You And The Planet

State of the Earth

An evening of conversation with climate scientists Sir Brian Hoskins and Professor Corinne Le Quéré, chaired by BBC Countryfile presenter Tom Heap. 

Tuesday 22 October 2019

10/22/2019

10/22/2019

Brian Hoskins and Corinne Le Quéré have decades of experience of understanding how human activity has influenced the natural world, and continue to pioneer ground-breaking solutions. In this event, they shared crucial insights into some of humanity’s greatest challenges with broadcaster and journalist Tom Heap.This event was the launch of You and the Planet, a series exploring global environmental issues with world-renowned speakers from science, business, politics and more. Watch the recorded video on YouTube and join the conversation at #YouAndThePlanet. Speakers Sir Brian Hoskins has been a Professor of Meteorology at Reading for more than 35 years, and is also the Chair of the Grantham Institute for Climate Change and the Environment. His international roles have included being vice-chair of the Joint Scientific Committee for the World Climate Research Programme, President of the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences, and involvement in the 2007 IPCC international climate change assessment. He has also had important UK roles both as a member of the UK Committee on Climate Change and by playing a major part in the 2000 Report by The Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution that first proposed a 60% target for UK carbon dioxide emission reduction by 2050. Corinne Le Quéré is Professor of Climate Change Science at the University of East Anglia and former Director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. She plays a key role in the annual update of the Global Carbon Budget, an international effort of the Global Carbon Project to provide the latest information global and national carbon emissions and their partitioning among the atmosphere, land and oceans, including their drivers. Corinne is a member of the UK Committee on Climate Change and is the Chair of France’s first Climate Change Committee. She was author of the 3rd, 4th and 5th Assessments of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.Tom Heap presents the investigations on Countryfile – Britain’s most popular factual TV programme – and is the principal voice of Costing the Earth on BBC Radio 4, the nation’s only dedicated environment series. He is also a regular Panorama reporter, covering food, farming energy and wildlife.  Please direct questions or queries to events@royalsociety.org.

youandtheplanet pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Data power at Pi: Platform for Investigation

In this special Royal Society takeover of Pi: Platform for Investigation, find out how different teams of scientists use data to tackle some of the world’s challenges, from the spread of disease to the ageing…

Tuesday 22 October 2019

10/22/2019

10/22/2019

During October half-term the Science and Industry Museum in Manchester will be running a series of Pi: Platform for Investigation events. Join scientist from Manchester Metropolitan University and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine to find out more about their work.Dr Moi Hoon Yap and her group from Manchester Metropolitan University use machine learning technology to advance facial recognition software.   Professor Shabbar Jaffar’s group, based at the Liverpool School for Tropical Medicine, study the treatment of non-communicable diseases like diabetes in comparison to the treatment of HIV.Learn more about the science they’re doing at Pi: Platform for Investigation.  For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Switching Perceptions

Think Tank live: An exploration in collective consciousness

Join Eleanor Minney, Liz Tunbridge and artist academic researcher Michaela Ross from the Bethlem for a guided Think Tank – a method of collective consciousness developed as part of the Switching Perceptions project…

Sunday 20 October 2019

10/20/2019

10/20/2019

Handle thought-provoking archive material to inspire our conversationAttending this event Free to attend, registration required  Event taking place in the Life Rewired Hub on the Ground Floor of the Barbican Centre Accessibility informationFor all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.This event is part of the Switching Perceptions series, 12 – 20 October 2019.

London

london switchingperceptions pastevents

PAST EVENT

Switching Perceptions

Brain cell cut and paste

Join Liz Tunbridge and Eleanor Minney for a combined science experiment and art workshop.

Saturday 19 October 2019

10/19/2019

10/19/2019

Tunbridge and members of her lab will sequence calcium channels in brain cells grown from human skin cells. Alongside this experiment, Eleanor will lead a collaging workshop designed to explore these processes and the idea of gene expression and creative expression. This two hour workshop begins at 11am and 2pm. Register for 11am-1pmRegister for 2pm – 11amAttending this event Free to attend, registration required  Workshop 11am-1pm and 2pm-4pm Event taking place in the Life Rewired Hub on the Ground Floor of the Barbican Centre Accessibility informationFor all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.This event is part of the Switching Perceptions series, 12 – 20 October 2019.

London

london switchingperceptions pastevents

PAST EVENT

Switching Perceptions

Symbols of the self

Join Eleanor Minney for a short talk about the exhibition followed by a drawing and textile workshop exploring symbols of the self. Take the opportunity to question the artist about her process and themes, and…

Thursday 17 October 2019

10/17/2019

10/17/2019

Attending this event Free to attend, registration required  Event taking place in the Life Rewired Hub on the Ground Floor of the Barbican Centre Accessibility informationFor all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.This event is part of the Switching Perceptions series, 12 – 20 October 2019.

London

london switchingperceptions pastevents

PAST EVENT

Switching Perceptions

Building brains from genes: Café Scientifique

Come and join Associate Professors Liz Tunbridge and Esther Becker for a discussion of the many ways that genes influence brain function, and how understanding these links is relevant to health and disease.

Wednesday 16 October 2019

10/16/2019

10/16/2019

Attending this event Free to attend, registration required  Event taking place in the Life Rewired Hub on the Ground Floor of the Barbican Centre Accessibility informationFor all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.This Café Scientifique is an open scientific discussion. The Cafés are dialogue-based and allow time for discussion between and amongst the audience and the speaker, where you’re encouraged not just to bring an enquiring mind, but your own thoughts and questions.This event is part of the Switching Perceptions series, 12 – 20 October 2019.

London

london switchingperceptions pastevents

PAST EVENT

Switching Perceptions

Café Scientifique

Artist Eleanor Minney and Neuroscientist Liz Tunbridge discuss the research and artistic rationale driving the Switching Perceptions project. They will explore the benefits of interdisciplinary collaboration in…

Monday 14 October 2019

10/14/2019

10/14/2019

Attending this event Free to attend, registration required  Event taking place in the Life Rewired Hub on the Ground Floor of the Barbican Centre Accessibility informationFor all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.This event is part of the Switching Perceptions series, 12 – 20 October 2019.

London

london switchingperceptions pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Could you make a Robot Orchestra?

Engineers and inventors have been finding new and exciting ways to use electricity since we first harnessed it over 200 years ago. From the first electric light to the appliances in our homes today, the machines we…

Sunday 13 October 2019

10/13/2019

10/13/2019

Professor Danielle George, winner of the 2018 Royal Society Michael Faraday Prize, is an inventor who knows the importance of learning to experiment with mending and improving things from a young age.  Her work focuses on designing astronomical instruments to observe and understand the universe. Join Danielle for a family-focused interactive talk exploring inventing, technologies and the importance of taking things apart, with a special performance from her famous Robot Orchestra. Danielle is passionate about giving the next generation the skills to become scientists and engineers, which led her to create the Robot Orchestra with the help of local schools and organisations. Please direct questions and queries to events@royalsociety.org.

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Switching Perceptions

Family Workshop

What are your brain cells talking about? Join us for a conversation on the theme of neuron communication, neurodiversity and collaboration and draw your own version of neuron communication.

Sunday 13 October 2019

10/13/2019

10/13/2019

Join Eleanor Minney and Liz Tunbridge to create collaborative drawings and ask your science related questions.This two hour workshop begins at 11am and 2pm. Register for 11am-1pmRegister for 2pm – 11amAttending this event Free to attend, registration required Workshop 11am-1pm and 2pm-4pm Event taking place in the Life Rewired Hub on the Ground Floor of the Barbican Centre Accessibility informationFor all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.This event is part of the Switching Perceptions series, 12 – 20 October 2019.

London

london switchingperceptions pastevents

PAST EVENT

Switching Perceptions

Switching Perceptions

A series of events, workshops and talks that consider whether an understanding of our genes could lead to a better understanding of mental illness.

12 – 20 October 2019

10/12/2019

10/20/2019

Created by artist Eleanor Minney and Professor Liz Tunbridge in collaboration with patients from the National Psychosis Unit at the Bethlem Royal Hospital, the project will allow visitors to explore perspectives on the mind, brain, subjective experience and the genetic and biological components of psychiatric illness. Dissecting the space is Segment of Aself, Minney’s textile work which features hundreds of hand drawn ciphers alluding to a person’s holistic sense of self (including relationships, spirituality, illness and more) together with row upon row of genetic markers, only three of which relate to psychotic illness. Minney untangles the fragile threads of the human mind through delicate explorations into what creates a sense of self, and the relationship to psychiatric conditions.Attending this event This installation is free and can be found in the Life Rewired Hub on the Ground Floor of the Barbican Centre Accessibility informationFor all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.

switchingperceptions pastevents

PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

When science meets art: Marcus du Sautoy and Conrad Shawcross

Join mathematician Professor Marcus du Sautoy OBE FRS and artist Conrad Shawcross RA as they discuss how experimentation, curiosity and creative thinking are central to both science and sculpture. This event will be…

Wednesday 25 September 2019

09/25/2019

09/25/2019

Marcus du Sautoy is the Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science and Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of New College. His research uses classical tools from number theory to explore the mathematics of symmetry. He is author of popular science books and has presented numerous radio and TV series. He works extensively with a range of arts organisations from the Royal Opera House to Glastonbury Festival with the aim to bring science alive.Conrad Shawcross’ sculptures are imbued with an appearance of scientific rationality. They explore the borders between geometry and philosophy, physics and metaphysics. Throughout his work, Shawcross pays tribute to some of the great pioneers and analysts, and considers specific moments or figures from the past. Paradigm (Ode to the Difference Engine), 2006, references the life of Charles Babbage; Slow Arc Inside a Cube, 2007, takes its inspiration from the scientist Dorothy Hodgkin’s discovery of the structure of pig insulin; and most recently, ADA, 2013, is named after Ada Lovelace, credited by many as the world’s first computer programmer.Attending this event For all ticket enquiries, please contact the Royal Academy of Arts This event will be held in the Benjamin West Lecture Theatre, Burlington Gardens, Royal Academy of Arts Travel and accessibility informationFor non-ticket enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.This is the third talk in the ‘When science meets art’ series of events, organised in partnership between the Royal Academy of Arts and the Royal Society. The series seeks to explore how emerging technologies can drive artistic practice, how art can develop new approaches to scientific problems, and what makes for a successful collaboration between the two disciplines. 

London

london paneldiscussion pastevents

PAST EVENT

Open House

Open House 2019

A chance to explore the history and architectural highlights of Carlton House Terrace, the home of the UK’s national academy of science.

21 – 22 September 2019

09/21/2019

09/22/2019

Over the weekend, visitors are invited to discover the secrets of the Grade I listed, Nash-designed town houses that are home to the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence. Uncover countless treasures behind the doors of 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, including portraits of Royal Society Fellows dating back to the 1600s, an ornate mother-of-pearl inlay ceiling, and features from the building’s time as the pre-WWII German Embassy.Tours of the building will be available every 30 minutes with limited spaces. Visitors can explore the building at their own pace with a self-guided tour, available to collect on the day free of charge. Delve into the world of volcanoes with our exhibition Fiery Earth: the volcano and the Royal Society. This exhibition looks at how scientists struggled to understand volcanoes and why the eruption of Krakatoa in 1883 gave urgency to discovering more about what lies beneath the surface of our planet. What is Open House?Open House is a simple but powerful concept: hundreds of great buildings of all types and periods open up their doors to all, completely without charge. This unique opportunity to access and understand architecture is a chance to look at everyday buildings anew, and communicates the value of a well-designed city to everybody who uses it. For more information visit the Open House website.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.Take a virtual tour of the Royal Society .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

London

Free Event

london openhouse pastevents

PAST EVENT

Cafe Scientifique

Café Scientifique: Your data, your health

Epidemiologists look for patterns of diseases in order to make informed, and important, predictions about the health of a population. These patterns come in the form of data and in an age where scientists have…

Thursday 19 September 2019

09/19/2019

09/19/2019

Dr Thomas House from the University of Manchester is a mathematical scientist who is exploring new methods to learn from our data and improve our health. Dr House has looked at the severity of Ebola outbreaks, the effects of friendship on mood in adolescent social networks, and the safety of scabies treatments.Attending this event Free to attend No registration required This event will take place in the Barbican’s Life Rewired Hub Accessibility information For all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.orgThis Café Scientifique is an open scientific discussion. The Cafés are dialogue-based and allow time for discussion between and amongst the audience and the speaker, where you’re encouraged not just to bring an enquiring mind, but your own thoughts and questions.This event is part of the Royal Society’s year-long partnership with the Barbican’s Life Rewired season. 

cafescientifique pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Learn about mosquitoes

Things change all the time, and when this happens, we adapt. Nature is no different. 

Tuesday 27 August 2019

08/27/2019

08/27/2019

Nearly all organisms in our world, even the very tiny ones adapt to changing conditions. The Reece group, at the University of Edinburgh, study the tiny parasites that cause malaria, the mosquitoes that spread them, and especially how they adapt to the changing environment they live in.Come and enter the weird and wonderful world of mosquitoes at the Great North Museum: Hancock. Find out how they grow, make their buzzing sound, and why they enjoy sugary drinks. Learn how hairs are connected to nasty smells, how mosquitoes discovered swimming armbands before we did, and how mosquito tummies are the home to malaria-causing parasites.There will be buzzing – and swimming – mosquitoes, microscopes to have a closer look, and mosquito art.Attending this event This activity is part of the Great North Museum: Hancock’s Invasive Species Week Entry to the museum is free, but donations are welcomed Travel and accessibility informationFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org. 

scientificareas festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Cafe Scientifique

Robotic autonomy in our complex world

The dream that people will be served by robots that share their personal spaces is not too distant.

Thursday 15 August 2019

08/15/2019

08/15/2019

Just like humans, autonomous robots have the ability to decide on the actions they will take based on the situation they are in. But what would it take to replace specialised robots such as automatic vacuum cleaners with autonomous, multi-purpose robots in people’s homes? They need to be equipped with ‘intuitive physics’ that will allow them to navigate our shared spaces and to manipulate objects.Dr Kartic Subr from the University of Edinburgh teaches robots how to handle complex materials using machine learning techniques, enabling them to move through, touch and interact with our daily environment. Join Dr Subr to find out whether robots can build intuition through interactive experiences. Attending this event Free to attend No registration required Doors open at 7:30pm and event starts at 7:45pm This event will take place in the Barbican’s Life Rewired Hub Accessibility information For all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.orgThis Café Scientifique is an open scientific discussion. The Cafés are dialogue-based and allow time for discussion between and amongst the audience and the speaker, where you’re encouraged not just to bring an enquiring mind, but your own thoughts and questions.This event is part of the Royal Society’s year-long partnership with the Barbican’s Life Rewired season.

London

london cafescientifique pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Molecular music: The sound of chemistry

At first glance, chemistry and music don’t have much in common. Dr Nicolas Barry and Dr William Martin from the University of Bradford will show you otherwise.

Thursday 18 July 2019

07/18/2019

07/18/2019

In their talk, as part of the launch evening of the Bradford Science Festival at the Museum of Science and Media, they played audiences the sounds of vibrating chemical bonds. Each molecule has its own unique set of musical notes which will only change in a chemical reaction. Dr Barry and Dr Martin shared more about their research and the sounds of their musical molecules. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org. 

scientificareas festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Pointing a finger(print)

This event is part of our series of lightning lectures at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019. Perfect for getting a taste of science, why not catch one (or more) of these electrifying 15 minute…

Sunday 07 July 2019

07/07/2019

07/07/2019

Fingerprints left at a crime scene are critical in uncovering the identity of a perpetrator but how do we expose these invisible clues? And what happens if this crucial evidence is washed away, destroyed or otherwise damaged?Enter Dr Paul Kelly who, together with a team of chemists, has developed a pioneering new technique that will assist forensic investigators in answering the ‘who, what and when’ questions that can be crucial in solving a crime.From metal surfaces that have been scrubbed clean to remnants of prints on an ammunition case that have been removed through gun fire, Dr Kelly will reveal how chemistry can be the real hero at some of the most challenging crime scenes.Running timesThis event will run at 1.30pm and 5.15pm and last approximately 15 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 5 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Faces from the front

This event is part of our series of lightning lectures at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019. Perfect for getting a taste of science, why not catch one (or more) of these electrifying 15 minute…

Sunday 07 July 2019

07/07/2019

07/07/2019

It might surprise you to hear that plastic surgery was born not in the Hollywood Hills in the midst of the rich and famous, but from the battlefields and the trenches of World War I. Never before this time had such firepower been seen in battle and with this came an increase in the number and severity of facial injuries from the front line.Dr Andrew Bamji joins us to explain the major advances in facial reconstruction surgery during the Great War and to share some harrowing stories from post-war patients. He will introduce you to the father of modern plastic surgery, Harold Gillies, who set up a facial hospital in Kent during the war and revolutionised the field and explore why some of his ideas are still considered important today.Please note that this talk contains images that some visitors may find distressing.Running timesThis event will run at 12.45pm and 4.30pm and last approximately 15 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 5 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

The secret mind of pets

This event is part of our series of lightning lectures at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019. Perfect for getting a taste of science, why not catch one (or more) of these electrifying 15 minute…

Sunday 07 July 2019

07/07/2019

07/07/2019

We’re sure that all pet owners have wondered what their pet was thinking.You may have taken ‘paws’ to ponder: how do my pets perceive the world, learn about their environment and then use this information to make decisions?In order to answer these questions, Dr Anna Wilkinson will introduce you to the fascinating world of animal cognition and perception. She will reveal the surprising and remarkable cognitive abilities of animals, especially those we might not normally think of as ‘clever’… By the end of this talk, you’ll know just a bit more about what is going on inside of the brains of our furry, scaly and feathered friends.Running timesThis event will run at 12pm and 3.45pm and last approximately 15 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 5 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

The mighty science trail

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Sunday 07 July 2019

07/07/2019

07/07/2019

Join our intrepid explorer David Price as he tackles the mighty science challenges of St James’s Park.Survive dodging ducks, bounding over bridges, wondering about water and fantasising over flowers to become the ultimate park ranger.No volunteers will be harmed on this science trail, honest.Running timesThis event will run at 11.30am, 1.45pm, and 3.45pm and last approximately one hour.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Tickets available one hour before event time Suitable for ages 7+ Unaccompanied children will not be permitted to take part in this tour Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Exploring exoplanets

This event is part of our series of lightning lectures at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019. Perfect for getting a taste of science, why not catch one (or more) of these electrifying 15 minute…

Sunday 07 July 2019

07/07/2019

07/07/2019

With the explosion in data from space missions such as Kepler, researchers have observed more than 3,500 planets orbiting around stars. In fact, the latest estimates indicate that, on average, every star in our galaxy has at least one planet orbiting it. That’s over a thousand billion planets crowding the Milky Way alone.Join astrophysicist Professor Giovanna Tinetti as she explores these exotic planets. Discover how new techniques in machine learning allow researchers to analyse atmospheric data to understand which planets out there might be inhabitable, or perhaps even inhabited.Running timesThis event will run at 11.15am and 3pm and last approximately 15 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 5 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Deep ocean lab

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Sunday 07 July 2019

07/07/2019

07/07/2019

What happens as you dive further and further into the dark ocean?Join YouTuber and BBC presenter Greg Foot for the story of his scientific adventure to the deep.With experiments and stunning videos, Greg will show you the high-tech submersibles that took him down a mind-blowing 1000ft into the Twilight Zone. He’ll explain the importance of our oceans, and – thanks to Greg’s work with the Blue Planet II team – uncover the effect we’re having on them.Plus you’ll get the chance to meet a creature from the deep!Running timesThis event will run at 11am, 1pm and 3pm and last approximately 45 minutes.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Tickets available one hour before event time Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Powering the future

This event is part of our series of lightning lectures at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019. Perfect for getting a taste of science, why not catch one (or more) of these electrifying 15 minute…

Sunday 07 July 2019

07/07/2019

07/07/2019

What comes to mind when you think of renewable energy? Perhaps you imagine a vast solar farm, or maybe you’re picturing spinning wind turbines in a field. Renewable energy sources like these are already having an impact on the type of power we use, but we are still a long way from curbing our reliance on fossil fuels.Could the answer lie away from the large-scale infrastructure of fields and farms and in the chemistry lab?Join Dr Ulrich Hintermair as he explains how a reaction involving water molecules and electricity can create a clean and sustainable source of hydrogen fuel. Discover how a newly developed catalyst can be used to speed up this reaction which is known as water splitting. And explore the ways that this environmentally friendly fuel could contribute to powering our future.Running timesThis event will run at 10.30am and 2.15pm and last approximately 15 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 5 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Makerspace

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Sunday 07 July 2019

07/07/2019

07/07/2019

Drop in to our pop-up makerspace hosted by the team from Barclays Eagle Labs.Shoot, score and bring it home in a game of robot football, where you get to control a microbit powered bot. Compete for the chance to win a personalised, laser cut medal.Witness the science of 3D printing with several printers demonstrating this art live around you. You might also get the chance to see someone’s head being printed in 3D.For the creative thinkers and engineering tinkerers, this is an activity not to be missed.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Street Science

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Sunday 07 July 2019

07/07/2019

07/07/2019

Street Scientists by name, street scientists by trade, meet the team from Newcastle University who have mastered the art of science busking. From mind warping optical illusions to getting jiggy to the sound of a slinky, their demonstrations are sure to amaze and excite.What does ketchup in a bottle of water have in common with a submarine? And, how can someone guess your birthday using only binary numbers? You’ll have to bump into the Street Scientists roaming around the exhibition to find out.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Kids’ zone

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Sunday 07 July 2019

07/07/2019

07/07/2019

Ever wondered how the universe started? Or what makes us different from other animals?Visit the Little House of Science team as we explore the answers to these questions and much more.With a series of exciting experiments and hands-on demonstrations, inquisitive young minds can experiment, explore and play in the Kids’ zone.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for children under 10 Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite café The Kids’ zone is also open on Saturday 6 July 2019For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Let me take a (bio)selfie

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Sunday 07 July 2019

07/07/2019

07/07/2019

Create your own unique and colourful self-portrait using the bacteria swabbed from your cheek with Dr Chloe James and her team from the University of Salford.Your swab will be used like a brush with paint to lay the foundations of your unique microbiome artwork on an agar plate. This invisible design will then be grown in a lab with the end result being your vibrant and multi-coloured bioselfie that will be photographed and sent to you.As you produce your work of art, you will discover how the reactions of different bacteria produce different colours when grown, and how this helps scientists to identify bacteria in the lab. You will also have a chance to prepare microscope slide stains and look at the bacterial cells that are living in your own mouth.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

From test tube to YouTube

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Saturday 06 July 2019

07/06/2019

07/06/2019

Eleven years ago Professor Martyn Poliakoff and a group of colleagues began collaborating with the film-maker Brady Haran to make videos about each of the 118 elements of the Periodic Table.Now, with over 200 million views on YouTube and nearly 1.2 million subscribers, it is clear that their videos are popular all over the world and show people of all ages that chemistry is interesting, fun and exciting.Join Professor Poliakoff to explore how something that began as a quick summer project has become an on-going activity that has taken him and his team to the far reaches of the globe, meeting extraordinary people and learning so much about the chemistry of the elements along the way.And, with 2019 being the International Year of the Periodic Table, this is an unmissable chance to join people across the world in celebrating Mendeleev’s first publication of his version of the table with one of the world’s most renowned chemists.Running timesThis event will run at 4.45pm and last approximately 30 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

The art of AI extrapolation

This event is part of our series of lightning lectures at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019. Perfect for getting a taste of science, why not catch one (or more) of these electrifying 15 minute…

Saturday 06 July 2019

07/06/2019

07/06/2019

Join Professor Yarin Gal to discover new techniques in machine learning that will give you the chance to venture beyond the frame of some of your favourite paintings.Have you ever wondered what Saint-Rémy-de-Provence looked like beyond Van Gogh’s ‘Starry Night’? Or have you been curious about what lay beneath ‘The Great Wave off Kanagawa’ by Hokusai?Using extrapolation, a technique where AI analyses existing patterns to predict what might happen next in a sequence, we can imagine what these and other masterpieces may have looked like if the artist had carried on painting.See these, and other extrapolated works of art, in this exploration of the intersection between algorithms and art.Running timesThis event will run at 1.30pm and 5.30pm and last approximately 15 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 5 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Uncovering the complexity of doping in sport

This event is part of our series of lightning lectures at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019. Perfect for getting a taste of science, why not catch one (or more) of these electrifying 15 minute…

Saturday 06 July 2019

07/06/2019

07/06/2019

Allegations of doping have the immense power to rock the sporting world.Indeed, the choice to take performance enhancing substances is often portrayed as one made by an individual with a vicious competitive streak, corrupt morals and questionable ethics. However, while the weight of victory might be one an athlete strives to bear whatever the means, new findings suggest that the reasons for doping extend beyond the individual.Professor Sue Backhouse asks the question ‘are dopers born or made?’ and explores the social psychology of doping. Specifically, she considers the complex social and environmental factors that might make an athlete vulnerable to doping.Running timesThis event will run at 12.45pm and 4.15pm and last approximately 15 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 5 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Mummies and molecules

This event is part of our series of lightning lectures at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019. Perfect for getting a taste of science, why not catch one (or more) of these electrifying 15 minute…

Saturday 06 July 2019

07/06/2019

07/06/2019

There is arguably no symbol from ancient Egypt more recognisable than mummies.To the ancient Egyptians the preservation of the body of the deceased was vital in order to provide a permanent home for a person’s spirit or soul in the afterlife, giving them the immortality they sought. Yet how did the Egyptian embalmers defy nature and achieve such lifelike results through mummification? While the dead can’t tell us themselves, science can reveal their secrets.Dr Stephen Buckley explains how we can use chemistry to identify the techniques and materials employed in the embalmers’ ‘art’, from its origins over 6000 years ago to its skilful height around the time of Tutankhamen. Discover how this analysis can bring the ancient Egyptians back to life by providing insight into their innovation, trade and politics.Please note that this talk might include images of human remains.Running timesThis event will run at 12:00pm and 3:45pm and last approximately 15 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 5 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

The mighty science trail

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Saturday 06 July 2019

07/06/2019

07/06/2019

Join our intrepid explorer David Price as he tackles the mighty science challenges of St James’s Park.Survive dodging ducks, bounding over bridges, wondering about water and fantasising over flowers to become the ultimate park ranger.No volunteers will be harmed on this science trail, honest.Running timesThis event will run at 11.30am, 1.45pm and 3.45pm and last approximately one hour.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Tickets available one hour before event time Suitable for ages 7+ Unaccompanied children will not be permitted to take part in this tour Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Building ourselves

This event is part of our series of lightning lectures at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019. Perfect for getting a taste of science, why not catch one (or more) of these electrifying 15 minute…

Saturday 06 July 2019

07/06/2019

07/06/2019

Cliché though it may be to say, cells are truly the building blocks of life. Much as an architect maps out where structures will go and what part of the building breeze blocks form, there are mechanisms in early development that direct our own construction.Join Dr Kathy Niakan as she describes her groundbreaking research into human pluripotent embryonic cells. These are cells that are capable of becoming any type of cell in the human body, from those found in the heart and the brain to those that make up bone tissue.But in the incredibly complex blueprint that is human development, how do cells know what to become? What factors influence their specialisations and how is this process ‘turned off’ once specialised?Hard hats at the ready as you discover the intricacies underpinning early cell development and those that direct the fate of our cells.Running timesThis event will run at 11.15am and 3pm and last approximately 15 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 5 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Lunar Explorers

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Saturday 06 July 2019

07/06/2019

07/06/2019

Get ready to explore the lunar landscape with science presenter Neil Monteiro.Relive the story of the first Moon landings and gaze ahead to the future of space travel. Be wowed by amazing demonstrations showing how rockets work, spaceplanes fly and orbiting stations orbit. Learn incredible facts about how the Apollo missions got off the ground and onto the lunar surface. And finally, test drive (metaphorically, of course) the next generation of space vehicles that will soon take new astronauts back to the moon. Packed full of gravity defying demonstrations and out of this world tricks, this is a show to inspire the next generation of intrepid space explorers.Running timesThis event will run at 11am, 1pm and 3pm and last approximately 45 minutes.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Tickets available one hour before event time Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Seeing the air you breathe

This event is part of our series of lightning lectures at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019. Perfect for getting a taste of science, why not catch one (or more) of these electrifying 15 minute…

Saturday 06 July 2019

07/06/2019

07/06/2019

We can’t see air but we know it surrounds us and that we rely on it to survive. Therefore, unsurprisingly, the quality of this life-giving mixture of gases has become of increasing concern.Atmospheric physicist Dr Mark Richards joins us to explain how we can monitor this using environmental sensing systems that can rapidly identify, track and map air pollution.Whether by bus, bicycle or car, you might be accompanied by one of these wireless sensors as you commute to work. As you ride, these sensors will be collecting crucial data on-the-move that can enable the real-time visualisation of the quality of the air around you.Discover the impact that such technology could have on local and global policy and, perhaps for the first time, see the air you breathe.Running timesThis event will run at 10.30am and 2.15pm and last approximately 15 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 5 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Makerspace

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Saturday 06 July 2019

07/06/2019

07/06/2019

Drop in to our pop-up makerspace hosted by the team from Barclays Eagle Labs.Shoot, score and bring it home in a game of robot football, where you get to control a microbit powered bot. Compete for the chance to win a personalised, laser cut medal.Witness the science of 3D printing with several printers demonstrating this art live around you. You might also get the chance to see someone’s head being printed in 3D.For the creative thinkers and engineering tinkerers, this is an activity not to be missed.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Street Science

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Saturday 06 July 2019

07/06/2019

07/06/2019

Street Scientists by name, street scientists by trade, meet the team from Newcastle University who have mastered the art of science busking. From mind warping optical illusions to getting jiggy to the sound of a slinky, their demonstrations are sure to amaze and excite.What does ketchup in a bottle of water have in common with a submarine? And, how can someone guess your birthday using only binary numbers? You’ll have to bump into the Street Scientists roaming around the exhibition to find out.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

How stars made the elements brick by brick

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Saturday 06 July 2019

07/06/2019

07/06/2019

Celebrate the 150th anniversary of the periodic table of the elements with LEGO® master Dr Ben Still.In this interactive drop-in activity you will discover how the chemical elements, the building blocks of everything around us, are created through the lives and deaths of stars.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Kids’ zone

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Saturday 06 July 2019

07/06/2019

07/06/2019

Ever wondered how the universe started? Or what makes us different from other animals?Visit the Little House of Science team as we explore the answers to these questions and much more.With a series of exciting experiments and hands-on demonstrations, inquisitive young minds can experiment, explore and play in the Kids’ zone.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for children under 10 Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite café The Kids’ zone is also open on Sunday 7 July 2019For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

The next giant leap for mankind

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Friday 05 July 2019

07/05/2019

07/05/2019

Take a journey to Saturn as a part of the landmark Cassini-Huygens mission of exploration with space physicist Professor Michele Dougherty.After 20 years in space, the mission ended in a blaze of glory in 2017 with the spacecraft burning up in Saturn’s atmosphere. Before its death dive, the probe’s final orbits collected some fascinating data, awe-inspiring images and surprising results, including the discovery of water vapour plumes at Saturn’s small moon.Explore what these discoveries are and what they mean for future research and the search for life on other planets.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Incredible invertebrates

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Friday 05 July 2019

07/05/2019

07/05/2019

Join Mission: Invertebrate and the Royal Parks to discover the wonderful world of invertebrates.These not-so-creepy crawlies make up around 96% of all known animals and are incredibly important to our ecosystems. We wouldn’t last long without them.In this interactive session, learn how the beautiful bugs and beasties on your doorstep help plants to make seeds, recycle organic waste and much more…Running timesThis event will run at 3pm, 4pm and 5pm and last approximately 30 minutes.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Tickets available one hour before event time Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Rubbish Science Challenge

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Friday 05 July 2019

07/05/2019

07/05/2019

Calling all budding environmentalists, the team from Rubbish Science has an important mission for you.Can you think like a scientist and create something that has the potential to solve a real-world problem using only what we find in our bins?In a world where poverty and plastic pollution are growing crises, the Rubbish Science charity work with communities in some of the poorest regions in the world to equip them with the skills to turn trash into treasure. From fishing nets and self-watering plant pots to water filtration systems and fly traps, are you ready to join the movement and get creating?Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

People of science

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Friday 05 July 2019

07/05/2019

07/05/2019

Who inspires you? Brian Cox takes this question to some of the most eminent figures in science in this special screening of the Royal Society’s flagship video series.In this special screening of the short films, household names such as David Attenborough, Bill Bryson and Uta Frith discuss their most inspirational scientists from history.Using treasures from the Royal Society’s archive collections, the incredible stories of these individuals are brought to life on screen by the extraordinary people who are continuing in their footsteps.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Suitable for all ages Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Come as you are yoga

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Friday 05 July 2019

07/05/2019

07/05/2019

Reclaim your lunchbreak with a science of yoga class that will be as informative as it is invigorating.As you are led through simple poses and breathing exercises, you will discover the connection between the way you breathe and your nervous system. By the end of this class, you will not only understand the physical and emotional connection your brain has with your breath, but also feel the calming and self-regulating effects of connecting your breath, body and mind. This is yoga.We invite you to come as you are. No special clothes, fancy equipment or elastic flexibility necessary. You’ll simply be taking off your shoes and learning how to breathe with your brain in order to find an oasis of calm and mindfulness amidst the lunchtime hubbub.Please note that spaces are limited. We advise you to arrive early.Running timesThis event will run at 12pm and 1pm and last approximately 30 minutes.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Tickets available one hour before event time Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Come as you are yoga

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Thursday 04 July 2019

07/04/2019

07/04/2019

Reclaim your lunchbreak with a science of yoga class that will be as informative as it is invigorating.As you are led through simple poses and breathing exercises, you will discover the connection between the way you breathe and your nervous system. By the end of this class, you will not only understand the physical and emotional connection your brain has with your breath, but also feel the calming and self-regulating effects of connecting your breath, body and mind. This is yoga.We invite you to come as you are. No special clothes, fancy equipment or elastic flexibility necessary. You’ll simply be taking off your shoes and learning how to breathe with your brain in order to find an oasis of calm and mindfulness amidst the lunchtime hubbub.Please note that spaces are limited. We advise you to arrive early.Running timesThis event will run at 12pm and 1pm and last approximately 30 minutes.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Tickets available one hour before event time Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Come as you are yoga

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Wednesday 03 July 2019

07/03/2019

07/03/2019

Reclaim your lunchbreak with a science of yoga class that will be as informative as it is invigorating.As you are led through simple poses and breathing exercises, you will discover the connection between the way you breathe and your nervous system. By the end of this class, you will not only understand the physical and emotional connection your brain has with your breath, but also feel the calming and self-regulating effects of connecting your breath, body and mind. This is yoga.We invite you to come as you are. No special clothes, fancy equipment or elastic flexibility necessary. You’ll simply be taking off your shoes and learning how to breathe with your brain in order to find an oasis of calm and mindfulness amidst the lunchtime hubbub.Please note that spaces are limited. We advise you to arrive early.Running timesThis event will run at 12pm and last approximately 30 minutes.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Tickets available one hour before event time Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite caféFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Seeing music

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition Lates 2019.

Tuesday 02 July 2019

07/02/2019

07/02/2019

See music as you never have before in a special violin performance by Kaitlyn Hova.As a synesthete, Kaitlyn sees musical notes as colours and shapes. Every note she plays is like a paintbrush, and a song can transform into a colourful landscape. By using a violin that lights up with the colours she sees, Kaitlyn invites you to enter her cross-sensory world and experience music in a brand new way.Running timesThis event will run at 7.15pm, and 8.15pm and last approximately 15 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy during the evening and you may need to queue to get into the building.We will also be showing the FIFA Women’s World Cup Semi-Final between England and USA from 8pm.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite café Please note we operate a challenge 25 policy. ID may be required when purchasing alcoholic beveragesFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Where brain meets beat

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition Lates 2019.

Tuesday 02 July 2019

07/02/2019

07/02/2019

Prepare to be wowed as beatboxing legend Grace Savage takes to the stage in a special live performance.Grace will be joined by neuroscientist Professor Sophie Scott and together you will go beyond the ‘boots and cats’ to discover the remarkable science behind this performance art. Learn about how beatboxers are able to control their voices to produce such unique sounds and then see this skill in action.Warm your vocal chords up and get ready to get down as you explore the fascinating intersection where brain meets beat.Running timesThis event will run at 7pm, 8pm, and 9pm and last approximately 30 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy during the evening and you may need to queue to get into the building.We will also be showing the FIFA Women’s World Cup Semi-Final between England and USA from 8pm.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite café Please note we operate a challenge 25 policy. ID may be required when purchasing alcoholic beveragesFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Tales of science past

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition Lates 2019.

Tuesday 02 July 2019

07/02/2019

07/02/2019

Discover the best kept secrets of the Royal Society archives.In the depths below Carlton House Terrace lies a mind boggling collection of artefacts and records from the earliest times of scientific endeavour.For one night only our expert library team will share some of their favourites with you. From unusual objects to surreal stories about futuristic inventions, this is an exclusive opportunity to explore some archival treasures and learn about our fascinating history.Running timesThis event will run at 6.45pm, 7.15pm, 7.45pm, 8.15pm and 8.45pm and last approximately 15 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy during the evening and you may need to queue to get into the building.We will also be showing the FIFA Women’s World Cup Semi-Final between England and USA from 8pm.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 5 minutes before start of event Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite café Please note we operate a challenge 25 policy. ID may be required when purchasing alcoholic beveragesFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Make and taste

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition Lates 2019.

Tuesday 02 July 2019

07/02/2019

07/02/2019

Join 3D printer fanatic Hannah Cameron and the Royal Society’s catering team as they show off their food printing skills in this unique make and taste workshop.In this workshop, you will enjoy a live printing demonstration from desktop 3D printers ‘Ben’ and ‘Jerry’ and get to taste some of the collaborative creations that include edible glitter, chocolate and an (e)ton of mess.No previous experience of 3D printing or eating necessary.Running timesThis event will run at 6.30pm, 7.30pm and 8.30pm and last approximately 30 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy during the evening and you may need to queue to get into the building.We will also be showing the FIFA Women’s World Cup Semi-Final between England and USA from 8pm.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite café Please note we operate a challenge 25 policy. ID may be required when purchasing alcoholic beveragesFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Science cabaret

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition Lates 2019.

Tuesday 02 July 2019

07/02/2019

07/02/2019

Many research projects span years, but tonight these researchers have only minutes to tell you all about their work.Join us for a series of short talks throughout the night from Royal Society-funded researchers as they step into the spotlight to describe exactly what it is they’re doing and why. This whistle-stop tour covers topics from combating antibiotic resistance to preventing civil engineering disasters in bite-size 5 minute sessions.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.We will also be showing the FIFA Women’s World Cup Semi-Final between England and USA from 8pm.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite café Please note we operate a challenge 25 policy. ID may be required when purchasing alcoholic beveragesFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Summer Science Exhibition Lates

This event is for over 18s only and is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2019.

Tuesday 02 July 2019

07/02/2019

07/02/2019

Join us after hours to explore the Summer Science Exhibition and enjoy an evening of science, music and cocktails.Our late night opening offers an exclusive and exciting programme of activities, alongside the opportunity to see 22 exhibits showcasing cutting-edge research in the main exhibition. From the science of beatboxing to 3D printing food, these innovative workshops, talks and hands-on activities make this an evening not to be missed for those with curious minds.We will also be showing the FIFA Women’s World Cup Semi-Final between England and USA from 8pm.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Over 18s only Doors open from 6pm Food and drink will be available for purchase on-site (cash and card both accepted) Please note we operate a challenge 25 policy. ID may be required when purchasing alcoholic beverages Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirementsFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Discovery hub

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition Lates 2019.

Tuesday 02 July 2019

07/02/2019

07/02/2019

Meet some of the scientists funded by the Royal Society at this hands-on hub of discovery.From scientists who 3D print the Earth, to astrophysicists who can transport you to outer space at the touch of a button, the Royal Society funds a range of leading researchers who invite you to join their scientific adventures. Could you escape the clutches of a hungry pitcher plant? Can you reveal the contents of a hidden message using terahertz radiation? Come along and give it a go to find out.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.We will also be showing the FIFA Women’s World Cup Semi-Final between England and USA from 8pm.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite café Please note we operate a challenge 25 policy. ID may be required when purchasing alcoholic beveragesFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Getting physics with it

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition Lates 2019.

Tuesday 02 July 2019

07/02/2019

07/02/2019

Pastels, pigments and pencils meet physics phenomena in this still life drawing workshop run by artist Jennifer Crouch.Get physical by drawing demonstrations of diffraction, explore electromagnetism through your illuminating illustrations and sketch the sound of resonance.It’s physics as you’ve never experienced it before. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.We will also be showing the FIFA Women’s World Cup Semi-Final between England and USA from 8pm.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite café Please note we operate a challenge 25 policy. ID may be required when purchasing alcoholic beveragesFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

All that glitters

This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition Lates 2019.

Tuesday 02 July 2019

07/02/2019

07/02/2019

Get your glitter on and be prepared to shine bright like a diamond after a visit to the roaming face painting station.As well as glam, this look is guilt-free as all products used are biodegradable and eco-friendly.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.We will also be showing the FIFA Women’s World Cup Semi-Final between England and USA from 8pm.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Food and drink will be available for purchase at our onsite café Please note we operate a challenge 25 policy. ID may be required when purchasing alcoholic beveragesFor all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Summer Science Exhibition 2019

Discover a future vision of wooden skyscrapers, four-legged automatons and galactic civilisations at the 2019 Summer Science Exhibition.

01 – 07 July 2019

07/01/2019

07/07/2019

Join us for our free, week-long festival celebrating the cutting edge of UK science. With a packed programme of thought provoking talks, jaw-dropping demonstrations and entertaining performances alongside 22 exhibits of hands-on science and technology, there’s something for all ages.A special evening opening of the exhibition will be held on Tuesday 2 July 2019 for adults only, with additional talks and workshops in a relaxed atmosphere. Head on over after work, grab a drink and explore the future. Families can explore the exhibition at their own pace during the weekend, with a dedicated children’s area in the cafe for younger members and exciting shows for all ages. Sign up to our newsletter to be the first to know when we announce our full programme of exhibits and events.Attending this event  Free and open to all No registration requiredFind out more about the Summer Science Exhibition. For general enquiries, please contact exhibition@royalsociety.org. 

London

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PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

When science meets art

Plant biologist Enrico Coen and artist Robert Kesseler join John O’Shea, Head of Programming at Science Gallery London, to discuss their longstanding collaboration that explores the convergence between art and…

Wednesday 26 June 2019

06/26/2019

06/26/2019

Recent advances in our understanding of how plants reproduce demonstrate the links between making art and making plant life. Much as a work of art may engage a human, plants create intricate shapes, such as those of an orchid flower or pitcher leaf, in order to lure animals.Over the past decade, Enrico Coen FRS and Rob Kesseler have been working together to explore the interface between science and art. Coen, a research professor at the John Innes Centre (an international centre of excellence in plant science, genetics and microbiology in Norwich) has been showing how groups of cells in microscopic buds achieve such diverse leaf and flower shapes. Kesseler, an artist and professor at Central Saint Martins in London, works from a microscopic examination of plant forms to create artworks in glass, ceramic and textiles. Coen and Kesseler will discuss their approaches to making, and how their collaboration has led to the creation of new forms that draw on both science and art.Due to unforeseen circumstances Munira Mirza, Executive Director of Science Gallery London is no longer able to chair this event and has been replaced by John O’Shea, Head of Programming at Science Gallery London. For non-ticket enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.This is the second talk in the ‘When science meets art’ series of events, organised in partnership between the Royal Academy of Arts and the Royal Society. The series seeks to explore how emerging technologies can drive artistic practice, how art can develop new approaches to scientific problems, and what makes for a successful collaboration between the two disciplines.

£10, £6

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PAST EVENT

Cafe Scientifique

Can AI help us cure cancer?

The brain is the most complex organ in your body. It controls your movement, emotions, speech and memory. The brain enables you to sense the world and allows you to make decisions. When brain surgeons operate on…

Thursday 20 June 2019

06/20/2019

06/20/2019

Scientist Dr Stamatia (Matina) Giannarou is teaching computers to distinguish between healthy and cancerous cells in real time during brain surgery. Future human – and robotic – surgeons will be able to remove cancerous tumours at even a microscopic level, significantly improving the outcomes of patients.Join us to discuss the use of machine learning in complex operations. What could this mean for the future of brain surgery?Attending this event Free to attend No registration required This event will take place in the Barbican’s Life Rewired Hub Accessibility information For all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.orgThis Café Scientifique is an open scientific discussion. The Cafés are dialogue-based and allow time for discussion between and amongst the audience and the speaker, where you’re encouraged not just to bring an enquiring mind, but your own thoughts and questions.This event is part of the Royal Society’s year-long partnership with the Barbican’s Life Rewired season.

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PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Beat the periodic table!

Have you got what it takes to figure out which chemical elements make up the everyday objects around you?

Thursday 13 June 2019

06/13/2019

06/13/2019

In 2019 the world is celebrating 150 years of the periodic table of elements. Find out more about chemical elements and how we use them in everyday life with Dr Alistair Boyer and his team. They have disassembled, dissected and dissolved several everyday objects. Now it’s your turn to match their parts to the elements of the periodic table. Some might seem obvious but some might surprise you! For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Festival Event

See through science

How can you prove the existence of something so tiny you can’t see it?

Thursday 13 June 2019

06/13/2019

06/13/2019

Scientists working on particle experiments like the Large Hadron Colliders have built special detectors to find these tiny particles. Join Royal Society Research Fellow Dr Mark Owen and his team and try out their x-ray machine to see inside everyday objects. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Dinosaur Atlas at the Hay Festival

Get your time machines at the ready and go on a journey to the prehistoric age with Anne Rooney, author of Dinosaur Atlas.

Saturday 01 June 2019

06/01/2019

06/01/2019

Walk alongside the massive megalosaurus, take to the skies with terrific pterosaurs and dive to the depths of an ancient ocean with the incredible ichthyosaur.Keep your eyes open though, you never know what other creatures you might meet along the way…Dinosaur Atlas was shortlisted for the Young People’s Book Prize 2018. Find out about the Young People’s Book Prize and how to get your school involved.  For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Festival Event

The next big thing

Royal Society Research Fellows Adi Kliot, Aquila Mavalankar, and Jackie Rosette discuss the next big thing.

Monday 27 May 2019

05/27/2019

05/27/2019

From the molecular genetics of insects and the use of lasers for investigating forests, to the latest in x-ray technology, three Royal Society Research Fellows discuss their work at the forefront of science with neuroscientist, writer and broadcaster Hannah Critchlow. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Venki Ramakrishnan in conversation with Adam Rutherford

Sir Venki Ramakrishnan, the President of the Royal Society and Nobel Prize-winning chemist, in conversation with Adam Rutherford, the presenter of BBC Radio 4’s Inside Science, about his book The Gene Machine: The…

Saturday 25 May 2019

05/25/2019

05/25/2019

DNA is the essence of our being, influencing who we are and what we pass on to our children. But the information in DNA can’t be used without a machine to decode it. The ribosome is that machine. Older than DNA itself, it is the mother of all molecules. Virtually every molecule made in every cell was either made by the ribosome or by proteins that were themselves made by the ribosome.In his book The Gene Machine, Ramakrishnan charts the unlikely journey from his first fumbling experiments in a biology lab to being at the centre of a fierce competition at the cutting edge of modern science. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

Free Event

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Lucy Cooke and Mark Miodownik in conversation with Roger Highfield

Whether it’s the bizarre truth about the animal kingdom or the delightful and dangerous fluids you encounter every day, scientific research can lead us to some unexpected places.

Saturday 25 May 2019

05/25/2019

05/25/2019

Join Roger Highfield, Science Director at the Science Museum, as he profiles two extraordinary books shortlisted for the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize: Lucy Cooke’s The Unexpected Truth about Animals: Stoned Sloths, Lovelorn Hippos, and Other Tales from the Wild Side of Wildlife and Mark Miodownik’s Liquid: The Delightful and Dangerous Substances That Flow Through Our Lives. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Sarah-Jayne Blakemore and Dan Davis in conversation with Hannah Critchlow

Explore the incredible abilities of our immune system and find out why the teenager in your life is so ready to take a risk.

Friday 24 May 2019

05/24/2019

05/24/2019

Leading researchers Dan Davis and Sarah-Jayne Blakemore shared their visionary work and discussed what compelled them to write about it with neuroscientist and broadcaster Hannah Critchlow. Davis’s The Beautiful Cure was shortlisted for the Royal Society Insight Investment Book Prize in 2018 and Blakemore’s Inventing Ourselves was crowned its winner in the same year. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org 

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

Seeing, Learning, Moving

How can AI and machine learning help computers take 2D videos of our movements and translate them into an animated 3D character? 

Thursday 16 May 2019

05/16/2019

05/16/2019

Using ground-breaking machine learning technology, Professor Adrian Hilton and his team at the Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, are able to teach computers to see the things we see – from detecting human motion for animation in film production and gaming, to learning how to distinguish cancerous cells from healthy ones in medical imaging. Come and try our live AI-driven motion capture technology and teach a robot how to dance.Attending this event Free to attend No registration required Limited seating available, standing room available. Please contact events@royalsociety.org if you require seating This event will take place in the Barbican’s Life Rewired Hub Accessibility information Drop-in activities from 2pmThis event is part of the Royal Society’s year-long partnership with the Barbican’s Life Rewired season.For all other enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Life begins at 40: the biological and cultural roots of the midlife crisis

During the 20th century, the midlife crisis became a fashionable means of describing feelings of disillusionment with work, disenchantment with relationships, detachment from family responsibilities, and the growing…

Monday 13 May 2019

05/13/2019

05/13/2019

Coined in 1965, the term ‘midlife crisis’ is often used as satire in popular culture, with numerous examples of stereotypical depictions of rebellion and infidelity. It has been a popular focus of research seeking to explain why and how middle age presents particular social, physiological and emotional challenges.In this lecture, Professor Mark Jackson, winner of the 2018 Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Medal, explored a rich range of historical sources to argue that the midlife crisis emerged as a result of demographic changes, new biological accounts of ageing, and deepening anxieties about economic decline, political instability, rising level of divorce, and the impact of family breakdown on social cohesion. This event was the 2018 Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Prize Lecture, which is awarded to recognise excellence in a subject relating to the history of science, philosophy of science or the social function of science.

scientificareas prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Our changing climate: learning from the past to inform future choices

The Kavli Lecture is given by Professor Ed Hawkins. 

Tuesday 30 April 2019

04/30/2019

04/30/2019

The long hot, dry summer of 2018 was a reminder that our society is vulnerable to unusual weather, through risks to human health, aging infrastructure, transport disruption and lower crop production.Such heatwaves are now hotter than in the past because the planet has warmed over the past century, largely due to human-caused emissions of greenhouse gases. Other consequences of a warming world include extreme rainfall events becoming more frequent and rising sea levels as the oceans expand and the glaciers melt.This lecture will outline how our climate has already changed and how volunteer ‘citizen scientists’ are helping us improve our understanding of extreme weather by recovering millions of lost historical weather observations that were taken over a century ago. Further changes to our weather and climate are inevitable, but it is our collective choices that will define what happens next.Professor Edward Hawkins was awarded the Kavli Medal and Lecture 2018 for his significant contributions to understanding and quantifying natural climate variability and long-term climate change, and for actively communicating climate science and its various implications with broad audiences. He is a climate scientist in the National Centre for Atmospheric Science at the University of Reading and a Lead Author for the forthcoming Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 6th Assessment Report and was awarded the Royal Meteorological Society’s Climate Science Communication Prize in 2017. He leads the WeatherRescue.org citizen science project to recover lost weather observations taken over a century ago.The lecture will be webcast live and the video recording will be available shortly after the event. For all enquiries, please contact the Events team.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Doors open from 18:00, and seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Live subtitles will be available British Sign Language interpretation will be available on request. Please let the Events team know if you plan to attend at least two weeks before the event This event may be popular, and entry cannot be guaranteed Travel and accessibility information

London

scientificareas london prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

Cafe Scientifique

Three Strange Loops

Following on from their Strange Loops triptych, Marcus du Sautoy and Joana Seguro discuss the inspiration behind the work – Douglas Hofstadter’s 1979 book Gödel Escher Bach.

Wednesday 17 April 2019

04/17/2019

04/17/2019

Jumping between the logical loops of Kurt Gödel, the impossible geometry of MC Escher and the interlocking cadences of Johann Sebastian Bach, the two discuss the self-referential and repeating patterns in nature and art, and perhaps the strangest loop of all – our own consciousness.Marcus du Sautoy is the Oxford Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science and a Fellow of the Royal Society. Joana Seguro is the producer of the Strange Loops series at the Barbican and founder of Art Klang.Attending this event This event is now fully booked Check our partner website for the latest up to date information Accessibility informationThis event is part of the Strange Loops triptych as part of the Royal Society’s year-long partnership with the Barbican’s Life Rewired season.For all other enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

From diagnosis to therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Wednesday 10 April 2019

04/10/2019

04/10/2019

The Croonian Lecture 2019 given by Dame Kay Davies DBE FMedSci FRS.Genetic approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of inherited muscle diseases have advanced rapidly in recent years. Most of the advances have occurred in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a muscle wasting disease where patients present with difficulties walking upstairs around the age of 3-5 years and are typically wheelchair bound by age 12. Affected boys generally die from respiratory failure or cardiomyopathy in their twenties.The identification of the gene causing DMD in 1986 resulted in improved diagnosis of the disease and the identification of hotspots for mutation. However there is currently no effective treatment.Dame Kay explored several promising genetic approaches at the preclinical stage or in clinical trials including exon-skipping, read-through of stop codons, delivery of dystrophin minigenes and the modulation of expression of the dystrophin related protein, utrophin. In spite of significant progress, the problem of targeting all muscles including diaphragm and heart at sufficiently high levels remains a challenge. However, DMD therapy is at an exciting stage and the current status of development of these therapies was presented.

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PAST EVENT

History Of Science

Explore Antarctica

Discover how polar exploration has shaped our understanding of the world we live in.

Thursday 28 March 2019

03/28/2019

03/28/2019

Expeditions into uncharted areas and unfamiliar countries underpinned early scientific research. Through observations and an incredible curiosity for their surroundings, early explorers helped develop our understanding of nature and paved the way for modern day research.Journey to the South Pole using recently rediscovered footage from the Royal Society archives showing the establishment of the first scientific base at Halley in 1956.Join our expert panel as we discuss the importance of polar exploration in scientific endeavour.Panellists include:Professor Eric Wolff FRS, University of CambridgeCamilla Nichol, UK Antarctic Heritage TrustDr Richard Powell, Scott Polar Research InstituteDr Anna Jones, British Antarctic Survey For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.orgAn audio recording for this event is available above. 

historyofscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

No series available.

I is a strange loop

Professor Marcus du Sautoy FRS joins the creative ensemble behind Complicité’s sensational A Disappearing Number. The play unfolds to reveal an intriguing take on mortality, consciousness and artificial life.

Friday 22 March 2019

03/22/2019

03/22/2019

Alone in a cube that glows in the darkness, X is content with his infinite universe and abstract thought. But then Y appears, insisting they interact, exposing him to her sensory and physical existence. Each begins to hanker after what the other has until a remarkable thing happens – involving a strange loop.Featuring acting mathematicians Marcus du Sautoy and Victoria Gould, I is a strange loop is part of a Barbican series investigating consciousness through music, machines and the mind. Led by Du Sautoy, who takes inspiration from the 40th anniversary of Douglas Hofstadter’s seminal book, Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, the play finds links between systems and creativity, technology and humanity, using theatre, music and art.This event has now sold out. To join the waiting list please get in touch with the Barbican box office.Attending this event This performance is repeated on 23 March at 2.30pm and 7.45pm. All performances are sold out.  For any enquiries relating to booking please contact the Barbican box office Accessibility informationThis event is part of the Strange Loops triptych as part of the Royal Society’s year-long partnership with the Barbican’s Life Rewired season.For all other enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.

pastevents

PAST EVENT

Cafe Scientifique

Psychogeography – can our postcodes predict our mental health?

How much does your postcode tell you about your psyche?

Thursday 21 March 2019

03/21/2019

03/21/2019

Epidemiology, the study of how often diseases occur in different groups of people and why, allows researchers to pinpoint the underlying causes of disease by viewing populations as a whole. The explosion in data collection across societies has allowed researchers to spot the causes and spread of diseases by stepping back to take the wider view.Join Dr James Kirkbride and Emily Sargent, Senior Curator at Wellcome Collection, who will be discussing how one of the greatest factors for our mental health is where we live. Not only can the type of built environment we live in – from concrete housing estate to leafy suburb – influence our mental well-being, but our cultural communities or how far removed we are from them can also play a role.Dr James Kirkbride is a UCL based epidemiologist whose research is funded by the Royal Society.Emily Sargent is curator of ‘Living with Buildings’, Wellcome Collection’s recent exhibition about health and architecture.This Café Scientifique is an open scientific discussion. The Cafés are dialogue-based and allow time for discussion between and amongst the audience and the speaker, where you’re encouraged not just to bring an enquiring mind, but your own thoughts and answers to the questions.Attending this event Free to attend No registration required This event will take place in the Barbican’s Life Rewired Hub Accessibility informationThis event is part of the Royal Society’s year-long partnership with the Barbican’s Life Rewired season.For all other enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

The quantum revolution in science and technology

The Bakerian Lecture 2019 is given by Professor Edward Hinds FRS.

Tuesday 19 March 2019

03/19/2019

03/19/2019

Modern research instruments can measure spectacularly small changes of length, time or energy. They use the quantum behaviour of atoms and light to achieve their extraordinary sensitivity. These devices help scientists to learn more about the very smallest of things – the shape of the electron – and also the very large – how the universe began.Now, the same types of instruments are starting to benefit society more generally. This quantum technology promises new capabilities ranging across IT security, navigation, medical imaging, mineral detection, simulation of complex systems, and many other topics.In this lecture Professor Edward Hinds explained what quantum behaviour is, and how these research instruments work. Professor Hinds discussed the current state of quantum science, and the prospects for transforming society through the emergence of quantum technology.Attending the eventThis event has taken place.The awardThe Bakerian Lecture series began in 1775 and is the premier lecture in the physical sciences.Professor Edward Hinds FRS was awarded the 2019 Bakerian Lecture for his achievements in controlling individual atoms, molecules and photons. With these, he has advanced our understanding of fundamental phenomena such as Casimir forces, dark energy, and supersymmetry.For all enquiries, please contact the Events team.

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The Eternal Golden Braid: Gödel Escher Bach

Could an algorithm ever write music to rival Bach? The audience decides in this performance lecture with Professor Marcus du Sautoy FRS, harpsichordist Mahan Esfahani and composer Robert Thomas.

Saturday 09 March 2019

03/09/2019

03/09/2019

Esfahani and du Sautoy guide us through the almost mathematical structures of Bach’s works, positing him as a musical coder – someone that applied rules to musical material to grow something complex and beautiful. Bach’s works are then fed through an algorithm, which uses the data in Bach’s writing to ‘compose’ a piece of its own. The audience is then asked to spot the piece made by the machine, not the human mind. Will you be able to tell the difference?With illusory visuals by Ben Kreukniet (who also presents an installation throughout March), and works by other composers that use algorithmic processes to create music, the evening opens with an interview between du Sautoy and Douglas Hofstadter, whose 1979 book Gödel, Escher, Bach inspired this event series.Attending this event Booking for this event can be done via the Barbican’s website. For any enquiries relating to booking please contact the Barbican box office Doors will open from 7.15pm Accessibility informationThis event is part of the Strange Loops triptych as part of the Royal Society’s year-long partnership with the Barbican’s Life Rewired season.For all other enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.

£25.50

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Behind a facade of order

In response to the seemingly impossible worlds of M C Escher, Professor Marcus du Sautoy FRS has collaborated with artist Ben Kreukniet to create an algorithmic installation which builds a tangled hierarchy between…

04 – 31 March 2019

03/04/2019

03/31/2019

M C Escher’s illustrations were a reflection of his inventive inner world, where mathematical playfulness met illusory, almost psychedelic landscape. Creating spatial impossibilities and alternative perspectives on reality. What would he have done with today’s technology?Using the architecture of the Barbican as a starting point, ‘Behind a Facade of Order’ constructs a complex digital world of feedback loops and visual paradox. As the movement of passers-by feeds the program, the constantly-evolving imagery blurs reality and virtual space. Where does the artist stop and the machine begin?Attending this event This event is free and can be found on the Ground Floor of the Barbican Centre Opening hours are 9.00am-11.00pm from Monday to Saturday and 11.00am-11.00pm on Sundays Accessibility informationThis event is part of the Strange Loops triptych as part of the Royal Society’s year-long partnership with the Barbican’s Life Rewired season.For all other enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.

Free Event

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Cafe Scientifique

Is hearing believing?

Royal Society Research Fellow Professor Jenny Bizley explores the neuroscience of our hearing and the crossover of our senses.

Monday 25 February 2019

02/25/2019

02/25/2019

Our brains process hundreds of sensory inputs at once, but only recently have we discovered that our sight might play a surprisingly big part in what we think we hear.Imagine you’re at the cinema – does the voice of the character on screen sound like it’s coming from the character’s mouth or from the speaker behind you? Most likely you answered ‘their mouth’. The perception versus reality is clearly different, but can we explain what’s happening inside our brains?Attending this event Free to attend No registration required This event will take place in the Barbican’s Life Rewired Hub Accessibility information This event is a Cafe ScientifiqueThis event is part of the Royal Society’s year-long partnership with the Barbican’s Life Rewired season.For all other enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.

Free Event

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Prize Lecture

‘Thinkering’: a solution to the Engineering Grand Challenges?

Join Professor Danielle George for a special performance of her Robot Orchestra and discover how it’s helping to solve some of society’s biggest challenges. 

Monday 18 February 2019

02/18/2019

02/18/2019

Professor Danielle George is an engineer with a passion for inspiring the next generation of scientists. She has dedicated her career to coming up with successful ways to include young people in the big questions society faces. One way that she has done this is through the development of a Robot Orchestra, a project with school groups in and around Manchester where young people design, build and code robots that can perform music. At this lecture, hear the Robot Orchestra play and find out how ‘thinkering’ could lead to a brighter future for us all. This event is the 2018 Michael Faraday Prize and Lecture, which is awarded to a practicing scientist or engineering who demonstrates excellence in the field of scientific public engagement.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Live subtitles will be provided for this event Doors open from 18.00 and seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Travel and accessibility information Please note, this event will be filmed as a livestream broadcast. You can watch the livestream on this page when the event startsFor all enquiries, please contact: events@royalsociety.org

London

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Festival Event

The secret life of the teenage brain

We often joke that teenagers don’t have brains. For some reason, it’s socially acceptable to mock people in this stage of their lives.

Sunday 17 February 2019

02/17/2019

02/17/2019

The need for intense friendships, the excessive risk taking and the development of many mental illnesses – depression, addiction, schizophrenia – begin during these formative years, so what makes the adolescent brain different?Sarah-Jayne Blakemore introduces her book Inventing Ourselves: The Secret Life of the Teenage Brain, winner of the Royal Society’s Insight Investment Science Book Prize, about her ground-breaking research into the adolescent brain. Professor Blakemore explores what her team’s experiments have revealed about our behaviour, and how we relate to each other and our environment as we go through this period of our lives. She shows that while adolescence is a period of vulnerability, it is also a time of enormous creativity – one that should be acknowledged, nurtured and celebrated.This event is part of a series of Royal Society events taking place at the 2018 Northern Ireland Science Festival.Attending this event Ticket is required £5 per ticket Suitable for 14+ Tickets are available from the Festival websiteFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org. 

Sold out

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History Of Science

Between rhyme and reason

Away from labs and fieldwork, scientific theories have long been interpreted and creatively portrayed by the arts. The advancement of technology and increasingly specialised science have made this collaboration more…

Thursday 07 February 2019

02/07/2019

02/07/2019

Join us for a conversation between Professor Veronica Van Heyningen CBE FRS FMedSci and award-winning poet Don Paterson OBE FRSL to discuss where science and poetry meet.Before the discussion, Don Paterson will perform poetry from his role as poet in residence on the Constructing Scientific Communities project, based at the University of Oxford, which is run in partnership with the Royal Society. Don will be accompanied by acclaimed guitarist Graeme Stephen. This event is being hosted in partnership with the Royal Society of Literature.

London

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Prize Lecture

Parkinson’s disease: decoding the mysteries of neurodegeneration

Francis Crick Lecture 2018 delivered by Professor Miratul Muqit.

Thursday 17 January 2019

01/17/2019

01/17/2019

Parkinson’s disease has emerged as a leading cause of brain degeneration in aged populations across the world. Patients typically develop a progressive disturbance of movement due to the selective loss of dopamine-containing neurons in the brain. The mechanisms for why these brain cells die have remained mysterious, hampering efforts to develop diagnostic tests and effective therapies that can slow the disease.In this talk, Professor Miratul Muqit discussed how genetic and biochemical discoveries are transforming our understanding of the biological basis of Parkinson’s. This has elaborated key signalling pathways that when disrupted in neurons lead to disease onset and progression. Professor Muqit discussed the potential application of this fundamental knowledge towards therapeutic strategies against Parkinson’s.The awardThe Francis Crick Medal and Lecture is awarded annually in any field in the biological sciences. Preference is given to genetics, molecular biology and neurobiology, the general areas in which Francis Crick worked, and to fundamental theoretical work, which was the hallmark of Crick’s science.The Francis Crick Medal and Lecture 2018 was awarded to Professor Miratul Muqit in recognition of his research on cell signalling linked to neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease. 

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You and AI presented by Professor Brian Cox

This event is fully booked. You can watch the livestream on this page.Throughout 2018, we’ve brought you the world’s leading thinkers on artificial intelligence.

Tuesday 11 December 2018

12/11/2018

12/11/2018

Now we’re calling on you to pose your questions to our panel of experts, to find out what challenges and opportunities you think AI will present us with in the next decade. Will AI affect our jobs? What risks might AI pose to society? Can we train AIs to make moral and ethical decisions?The panelThe panel will be hosted by Professor Brian Cox OBE FRS, physicist, author and broadcaster.The panel includes: Professor Peter Donnelly FRS FMedSci, Professor of Statistical Science, University of Oxford, and CEO of Genomics plc Dr Vivienne Ming, theoretical neuroscientist, technologist, entrepreneur and co-founder of Socos Professor Suchi Saria, John C. Malone Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins University, Department of Computer ScienceWe will also be showing off some of the incredible uses of AI. Professor Adrian Hilton, director of the Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing at the University of Surrey, will demonstrate how machine learning can be used to turn a camera into a 3D motion-capture device.Attending this event This event is now fully booked – you will be able to watch the livestream on this page or via the Royal Society’s YouTube channel Doors will open from 7pm Accessibility informationFor all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.orgSupported by DeepMind.

Free Event

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History Of Science

Collections by candlelight

Join us for a festive evening celebrating the history of the Royal Society and the remarkable scientific artefacts and stories housed in its extensive, world-class archives.Scroll down for the full event…

Thursday 06 December 2018

12/06/2018

12/06/2018

This year’s theme, a Victorian Christmas, is inspired by the many extraordinary scientific discoveries made in the Victorian era, and the romance associated with this holiday and with science during the nineteenth century.You will be treated to a special performance from a spectacular new science-themed dance piece, Sakura, produced by Sisters Grimm. Hear the story behind this collaboration of science and art as told by Professor Nicky Clayton FRS (University of Cambridge and Scientist in Residence at Rambert) and Mark Baldwin OBE (former artistic director at Rambert).The programme will include talks on science in Victorian fairy tales, astronomy in the 19th century, and Michael Faraday’s Christmas candle lecture, as well as festive activities such as printmaking greeting cards and mince pie molecular gastronomy.You will also have the unique opportunity to explore the beautiful Carlton House Terrace in all its festive glory by candlelight.Attending the event Over-18s only We are operating a Challenge 25 policy on the door and you may be required to show a valid form of ID to enter the event Free to attend No registration required Doors will open at 18:30 and admission will be on a first-come, first-served basis This event may be popular and entry cannot be guaranteed Travel and accessibility informationThe Royal Society’s aim is to make its events accessible to as many people as possible. This is why our events are free and offered on a first-come, first-served basis.Event programmeScience meets dance 7pm, 8pm, 9pmCelebrating 10 years of collaboration, Professor Nicky Clayton and choreographer Mark Baldwin present a special showcase of their critically-acclaimed Darwin-inspired dance performance. Festive food hall 6.30pm – 9.30pm‘Tis the season to fill up on festive treats so visit our food hall to enjoy a special selection of Christmas food and drink, including out-of-this-world mince pies and bespoke cocktail creations.Hidden treasures 6.30pm – 9.30pmTransform into a knight of the brush and sketch some of the amazing artefacts from the Royal Society archives in this still life drawing workshop.The nativity of greeting cards 6.30pm – 9.30pmTravel back to Christmas 1843 when the first greeting cards were commercially produced by Sir Henry Doyle and create your own striking screen printed cards of images from the Royal Society’s collections.Scientists under the spotlight 6.45pm – 9.15pm, every 30 minutesDiscover the lives of some of the most celebrated thinkers of the Victorian era, with live appearances from Charles Darwin, Mary Anning, Michael Faraday and Ada Lovelace.Captured in time 7pm – 7.45pmTake a look back in time to discover the art of Victorian photography and the processes used to create some of the period’s defining images.Optical toys 8.30pm – 9.15pmScience meets play in the form of the humble thaumatrope. Step into the shoes of the Victorian child, or child at heart, and design and build your very own version of these optical toys.Victorian stories of spirits and the supernatural 7pm, 8.15pm, 9pmHaunting histories and terrifying tales, Dr Melissa Dickson shares her expertise in 19th century literature and reads excerpts from some of the most bone-chilling examples of Victorian ghost stories.Bubble, bubble, Boys and spheres 7.30pm – 8pm Mathematician Dr James Grime will reveal how bubbles and soap film can solve problems and create beautiful shapes, with surprising applications in computing, electronics, architecture and beyond.Tales of science past 7pm – 9pm, every 30 minutesUncover the untold secrets of some of the science greats with this drop-in story-corner, run by our expert library team.Explore the building 6.30pm – 10pmWhy not take the chance to wander around the Society and take inspiration from the portraits, artefacts and exhibits on display?Lightning lecturesPerfect for getting a taste of Victorian science, why not catch one or more of these electrifying fifteen minute talks?“On the Chemical History of a Candle” 7pmDiscover Michael Faraday’s lasting legacy, including the incredible impact of his Christmas lectures at the Royal Institution, with Professor Frank James.Trick of the eye 7.30pmNeil Monteiro reveals the secrets behind some of the most dazzling Victorian optical illusions, from the excitement of Pepper’s ghost to the wonder of the magic lantern.Scientific shows and the Victorian Christmas 8pmFrom science-themed pantomimes and exhibitions to oratorios with electrical demonstrations, join the Science Museum’s Dr Rupert Cole to unveil how scientific amusements became fashionable during Victorian London’s festive season.  Architecture of the heavens 8.30pmJourney to the stars with Dr James Geach and explore the night sky as 19th century astronomers did. This talk includes an exclusive show and tell with artefacts from the Royal Society archives.

London

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When science meets dance

In the first of this new series exploring collaborations between the arts and science, Professor of Comparative Cognition, Nicola Clayton FRS, and outgoing Artistic Director of Rambert, Mark Baldwin CBE, discuss how…

Wednesday 28 November 2018

11/28/2018

11/28/2018

In collaboration with The Royal Academy of Arts, we present the first in a series of conversations between leading scientists and artists, exploring how experimentation, curiosity and creative thinking are central to both science and the arts. Through this series we discover how emerging technologies can drive artistic practice, how art can develop new approaches to scientific problems, and what makes for a successful collaboration between the two disciplines.Professor of Comparative Cognition Nicola Clayton FRS has held a position as Scientist-in-Residence at one of the world’s leading independent dance companies, Rambert, for over 10 years. Mark Baldwin CBE is Rambert’s outgoing Artistic Director. Clayton and Baldwin have collaborated on several new choreographic works inspired by science including Seven For A Secret Never To Be Told, What Wild Ecstasy, The Strange Charm of Mother Nature, the Laurence Olivier award-winning Comedy of Change, and most recently The Creation. They are also developing a book about their creative collaborative exchange called Movement in Mind: A Series of Beautiful Questions, with illustrations by Baldwin.In this event, they join Dr Erinma Ochu MBE (University of Salford) to discuss psychology, embodied cognition, choreography and animal intelligence, and what makes a productive collaboration between the arts and sciences.Attending this event For all ticket enquires, please contact the Royal Academy Doors open at 6.15pm Travel and accessibility informationFor non-ticket enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

London

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When science meets dance

In the first of this new series exploring collaborations between the arts and science, Professor of Comparative Cognition, Nicola Clayton FRS, and outgoing Artistic Director of Rambert, Mark Baldwin CBE, discuss how…

Wednesday 28 November 2018

11/28/2018

11/28/2018

In collaboration with The Royal Academy of Arts, we present the first in a series of conversations between leading scientists and artists, exploring how experimentation, curiosity and creative thinking are central to both science and the arts. Through this series we discover how emerging technologies can drive artistic practice, how art can develop new approaches to scientific problems, and what makes for a successful collaboration between the two disciplines.Professor of Comparative Cognition Nicola Clayton FRS has held a position as Scientist-in-Residence at one of the world’s leading independent dance companies, Rambert, for over 10 years. Mark Baldwin CBE is Rambert’s outgoing Artistic Director. Clayton and Baldwin have collaborated on several new choreographic works inspired by science including Seven For A Secret Never To Be Told, What Wild Ecstasy, The Strange Charm of Mother Nature, the Laurence Olivier award-winning Comedy of Change, and most recently The Creation. They are also developing a book about their creative collaborative exchange called Movement in Mind: A Series of Beautiful Questions, with illustrations by Baldwin.In this event, they join Dr Erinma Ochu MBE (University of Salford) to discuss psychology, embodied cognition, choreography and animal intelligence, and what makes a productive collaboration between the arts and sciences.Attending this event For all ticket enquires, please contact the Royal Academy Doors open at 6.15pm Travel and accessibility informationFor non-ticket enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

London

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Prize Lecture

When to trust a self-driving car…

2018 Milner Award Lecture given by Professor Marta Kwiatkowska.

Tuesday 20 November 2018

11/20/2018

11/20/2018

How can we ensure system correctness in the presence of uncertainty?Computing devices support us in almost all everyday tasks, from mobile phones and online banking to wearable and implantable medical devices. We are now experimenting with self–driving cars and robots.  Since embedded software at the heart of these devices must behave correctly in presence of uncertainty, probabilistic verification techniques have been developed to guarantee their safety, reliability and resource efficiency.Using illustrative examples, this lecture gave an overview of the role that probabilistic modelling and verification can play in a variety of applications, including security, medical devices, self-driving cars and DNA computing. It also described recent developments towards model synthesis, which aims to build these systems so that they are correct by construction. Finally, it explored the problems of ensuring that systems that rely on learning will behave correctly, both in situations that they have seen in training, and in situations that they haven’t.The prize lecture was webcast live and the video recording of the event will be available shortly after the event.Attending this eventThis event has taken place.The AwardThe Royal Society Milner Award, kindly supported by Microsoft Research, is given annually for outstanding achievement in computer science by a European researcher.The award replaces the Royal Society and Académie des sciences Microsoft Award and is named in honour of Professor Robin Milner FRS (1934-2010), a pioneer in computer science.Professor Marta Kwiatkowska was awarded the 2018 Milner Award in recognition of her contribution to the theoretical and practical development of stochastic and quantitative model checking.For all enquiries, please contact the Scientific Programmes team. .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

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Computing Education – 1 year on

Tuesday 20 November 2018

11/20/2018

11/20/2018

One year on from the Royal Society’s report on computing education ‘After the reboot’, the Royal Society, alongside the Digital Skills Partnership, hosted an event to discuss how the landscape has changed, and what more there is to do.The aim was to look back on the progress made since the publication of the report, as well as looking forward to explore how businesses can support the new National Centre for Computing Education and how industry can best support computing in schools, in particular.Over 70 business representatives attended and confirmed the interest and commitment of businesses to provide support for computing education. The day ended with a ‘Call to Action’ outlining the types of support needed and how organisations can direct their efforts to provide maximum impact.Professor Simon Peyton-Jones has produced a blog reflection on the day, which can be read here.

Free Event

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Anote’s Ark and geoengineering panel

Following its world premiere earlier this year at the Sundance Film Festival, the Science Museum and Royal Society present the English premiere of ‘Anote’s Ark’, the very first feature film to be shot in the…

Friday 16 November 2018

11/16/2018

11/16/2018

An island nation in the Pacific Ocean, Kiribati is destined to disappear within decades as a result of rising sea levels – granting its citizens the unfortunate title of first climate refugees in history.This moving documentary follows the country’s former president, Anote Tong, on his journey through international halls of power leading up to the UN Climate Change Conference.Could geoengineering solve the climate crisis?The screening is followed by a panel discussion exploring the subject of geoengineering – deliberate large-scale intervention in the Earth’s climate system, in order to moderate global warming.Could geoengineering be the answer to the impending climate crisis? Chairing the debate, physicist, oceanographer and television presenter Dr Helen Czerski will be joined by: Professor Joanna Haigh FRS Dr Jack Stilgoe, Senior Lecturer in Social Studies of Science at UCL Dr Naomi Vaughan of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Oliver Morton, science writer, author and briefings editor for The EconomistAttending this event For all ticket enquires, please contact the Science Museum Please note: this is a 2D digital screening lasting 77 minutes Doors open at 6.45pm Please arrive at the museum at least half an hour before the start of this event Travel and accessibility informationFor all enquiries, please contact info@sciencemuseum.ac.uk

London

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Diversity Conference 2018: Achieving diverse leadership in a research environment

Thursday 01 November 2018

11/01/2018

11/01/2018

The Royal Society is committed to increasing diversity in STEM by seeking out participation from under-represented groups, in order to build and develop a world in which studying and working in science are open to all. This year’s conference will explore barriers to diverse leadership in STEM and how the research community can work together to overcome them.Our 2018 conference brings you high-profile speakers from STEM academia and industry who will share their expertise in creating inclusive leadership teams and overcoming barriers to success. Highlights include Professor Michelle Ryan exploring why the precarious ‘glass cliff’ makes it harder for under-represented groups to achieve their leadership ambitions, and an afternoon address by Court of Appeal judge and Chairman of the Judicial College, Lady Justice Rafferty. Panel discussions will bring together experts from across AI, chemistry, engineering and other fields to discuss barriers to diverse leadership, such as gender pay gaps and research funding decisions, and delegates will be able to share their own ideas on solutions to these barriers at roundtable discussions. Our eminent speakers will also be sharing their views on how the scientific community can better support under-represented groups into leadership roles.The conference will be of particular interest to the research community, scientists, diversity practitioners, learned academies and societies, professional bodies and policy-makers.

London

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Conference

Research culture: Changing expectations

This event is now full.Research culture: Changing expectations will bring together intertwined debates around research assessment, career progression, researcher development, research dissemination and research…

29 – 30 October 2018

10/29/2018

10/30/2018

This landmark event, compèred by Professor Mark Miodownik FREng, will give attendees the opportunity to think creatively about how the culture of research can be different, to share and build on best practice across the sector, and develop new networks with individuals across the research landscape. Across the two days attendees will be invited to explore how the system and the behaviours of individuals in it can help to catalyse change. The conference will be the culmination of the Royal Society’s two year programme on research culture.The Pitch: ideas to positively change research cultureThis competition is an exclusive opportunity to pitch an idea or scheme to improve research culture in the UK and potentially receive a small grant to support its implementation. Submitted ideas will be shortlisted and the groups or individuals behind the top three will be invited to pitch them on stage at the Research culture: Changing expectations event. A panel of judges will challenge and probe the pitches before deciding whether to award a small grant to support its implementation.Entries to the competition are now closed. Full details can be found here.Confirmed speakers include: Professor Jim Al-Khalili OBE FRS (theoretical physicist, author and broadcaster) Dr Eugenia Cheng (Scientist In Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago) Dr Margaret Heffernan (author of Beyond Measure: the big impact of small changes) Sir John Kingman FRS, (Chair, UKRI) Liz Nicholl CBE (Chief Executive, UK Sport) Professor Venki Ramakrishnan PRS Dr Adam Rutherford (presenter of BBC’s Inside Science) Robert-Jan Smits (Open Access Envoy of the European Commission) Dr Magdalena Skipper (Editor in Chief, Nature) Dame Julia Slingo FRS David Sweeney (Executive Chair, Research England) Sir Mark Walport FRS (Chief Executive, UKRI)ProgrammeDownload the full programme here.Attending the event Research culture: Changing expectations is now fully subscribed The event will be livestreamed. Catch up:Monday 29 October YouTube linkTuesday 30 October YouTube linkFor all enquiries, please contact frances.downey@royalsociety.org

London

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You and AI at the Manchester Science Festival

Throughout 2018, we’ve brought you the world’s leading thinkers on Artificial Intelligence.

Sunday 28 October 2018

10/28/2018

10/28/2018

Now we’re calling on you to pose your questions to our panel of experts, to find out what challenges and opportunities you think AI will present us with in the next decade. Will AI affect our jobs? What risks might AI pose on society? Can we train AIs to make moral and ethical decisions?The panelThe panel will be hosted by Professor Jim Al-Khalili OBE FRS, physicist, author and broadcaster. Dame Wendy Hall DBE FRS FREng, Regius Professor of Computer Science at the University of Southampton and Executive Director of the Web Science Institute Professor Neil Lawrence, Chair in Neuro and Computer Science University of Sheffield and machine learning researcher at Amazon Dr Ewa Luger, Chancellor’s Fellow in Digital Arts and Humanities studying AI EthicsSupported by DeepMind.

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Awesome animals and epic engineers

How would it feel to see like a sea creature? How do bioengineers make materials that mimic mayfly wings or glow like a jellyfish?

Saturday 27 October 2018

10/27/2018

10/27/2018

Unearth the amazing ways in which evolution and animal mechanics are inspiring engineers to develop new sensors, substances and materials. Peek beneath the waves to see through the eyes of a cuttlefish, build your own invisible artwork and transport yourself into a future where biology meets eye-popping design.Attending this event Free to attend This event was part of the Manchester Science Festival Events were drop-in with no registration requiredFor all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.

Free Event

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Prize Lecture

Volcanoes: from fuming vents to extinction events

Rosalind Franklin Lecture 2018 delivered by Professor Tamsin Mather.

Thursday 18 October 2018

10/18/2018

10/18/2018

Volcanoes are spectacular natural phenomena. Earth has experienced volcanism since its beginnings and observing a volcanic eruption is a truly primeval experience. Volcanoes have shaped our planet and have been key in creating and maintaining its habitability. However, they can also be deadly natural hazards and are implicated in some of the greatest environment crises in Earth’s history, such as mass extinction events.In this talk, volcanologist Professor Tamsin Mather explored some of the different types of volcanic activity that we see on Earth today and have seen over our planet’s geological history. She revealed how lessons learnt sitting on the edge of an active volcano today can give us insights into some of the most profound environmental changes in geological history including mass extinction events.Attending the eventThis event has taken place.The awardThe Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture is awarded annually and is made to support the promotion of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.The Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture 2018 is awarded to Professor Tamsin Mather on the basis of her achievements in the field of volcanology, her ability to communicate with the public and her imaginative project proposal.Enquiries: please contact the Events team

Free Event

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Party Conference

What has science ever done for me? Conservative Conference

Tuesday 02 October 2018

10/02/2018

10/02/2018

Politicians are making challenging decisions on how to prioritise limited funds to improve people’s lives across the UK. Is research and innovation a good investment?The Government has committed to meet a target of 2.4% of GDP invested in UK R&D within ten years, and a longer-term goal of 3%. Delivering this ambition requires greater public and business investment in R&D. Now is the time for us to talk not just about the conditions that will encourage this investment, but how to spend smarter to improve people’s lives.Our speakers have personal stories that illustrate the wider public benefits of investment in research and innovation, from the obvious, such as new medicines and treatments, to the less expected, such as research-intensive start-ups creating local jobs and boosting local services. We will discuss why the 2.4% target matters not just to scientists and researchers but to everyone in society. We can all play a role in, and benefit from, delivering it together.Chaired by Professor Graeme Reid from University College London. Speakers include: Sam Gyimah MP, Minister of State for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation Professor Richard Jones FRS, Industrial Strategy Commission & University of Sheffield Professor Liz Tanner OBE FREng, Queen Mary University of London Dr Niall MacDougall, Barts Health NHS TrustThis event is hosted jointly with the Academy of Medical Sciences, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the British Academy.Attending the event Free to attend No registration requiredFor all enquiries, please contact the Public Affairs team.

Free Event

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Inspiring science books of 2018 with Brian Cox

Join our celebration of the best in popular science writing, as we announce the winner of this year’s Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize and speak to the authors of this year’s shortlist.

Monday 01 October 2018

10/01/2018

10/01/2018

Selected from more than 250 entries, this year’s six shortlisted books explore the fascinating hidden worlds of the everyday. They range from the precision engineering and complex computing that makes modern life possible, to ground-breaking research into how our own brains and immune systems work. We’re also given a new appreciation for the lives of the animals that inhabit our world, and a re-conceptualization of the solutions, solvents and substances that make everything possible from life to flight.The event will be hosted by Professor Brian Cox, who will discuss the influences and inspirations that have guided each writer, plus there’ll be a chance for you to ask your own questions to the panel of authors.If you’re unable to get to central London on the night you can still follow along at home on our livestream broadcast.Kindly supported by Insight Investment.For all enquiries, please contact sciencebooks@royalsociety.org2018 shortlist  Inventing Ourselves: The Secret Life of the Teenage Brain by Sarah Jayne Blakemore The Unexpected Truth About Animals by Lucy Cooke The Beautiful Cure: Harnessing Your Body’s Natural Defences by Daniel Davis Hello World: How to be Human in the Age of the Machine by Hannah Fry Liquid: The Delightful and Dangerous Substances That Flow Through Our Lives by Mark Miodownik Exactly: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World by Simon WinchesterFind out more about the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Doors open from 18.00 Seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis This event will be livestreamed Live subtitles will be available British Sign Language interpretation will be available on request. Please let the events team know if you plan to attend at least two weeks before the event. Travel and accessibility information The Royal Society’s aim is to make its events accessible to as many people as possible. This is why our events are free and offered on a first-come, first-served basis

pastevents

PAST EVENT

Party Conference

How long until we have a robot for PM? Are the predictions about the future of work getting ahead of reality? Conservative…

Monday 01 October 2018

10/01/2018

10/01/2018

Artificial intelligence has the potential to revolutionize the way that we live and work. While some predict this could usher in a new wave of hi-tech jobs, others warn of widespread job losses. But what predictions should we trust? Will accountants and lawyers be replaced by algorithms, or will new technologies help them work faster and smarter? Will our smartphones replace a trip to the doctor, or simply free them up to spend more time with each of their patients? Are politicians out of a job? What can policymakers do now to prepare for an unpredictable future?Join researchers and robots to unpick some of the assumptions that underpin predictions about how the world of work might change, and explore what we do – and don’t – know about the impact of AI on work.This event is supported by Imperial College London and we will share the findings of a joint British Academy and Royal Society report on AI and work. Chair: Ian Sample, Guardian Science Editor Speakers:  Zeno the Robot Robert Halfon MP, Chair of the Commons Education Select Committee Professor Nick Jennings FREng, Vice-Provost (Research and Innovation) Imperial College London Caroline Daniel, Brunswick Group  Anna Thomas Founding Director, Institute for the Future of Work  Dr Claire Craig, Chief Policy Officer, the Royal SocietyAttending the event Free to attend No registration requiredFor all enquiries, please contact the Public Affairs team.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Exploring the unknown

Discover how scientific exploration has shaped our understanding of the world we live in.

Wednesday 26 September 2018

09/26/2018

09/26/2018

Expeditions into uncharted areas and unfamiliar countries underpinned early scientific research. Through observations and an incredible curiosity for their surroundings, early explorers helped develop our understanding of nature and paved the way for modern day research.Join our expert panel as we discuss the importance of exploration in scientific endeavour. Journey to unknown parts of the world using recently rediscovered footage from the Royal Society archives and explore how fieldwork still plays an essential part of scientific method.Panellists include: Professor Robert White FRS FGS, Professor of Geophysics, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge Dr Jahnavi Joshi, Royal Society Newton International Fellow at Natural History Museum, London Camilla Nichol, Chief Executive at the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust Dr Simon Werrett, Senior Lecturer in History and Philosophy of Science at UCL Professor Jon Agar, Professor of Science and Technology Studies at UCLThis event is part of the 2018 Gravity Fields festival, Grantham.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

astronomyandphysics organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology chemistry chemistry festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

People of Science

Who inspires you? Brian Cox takes this question to some of the most eminent figures in science in the Royal Society’s flagship video series, People of Science.

Wednesday 26 September 2018

09/26/2018

09/26/2018

In this special screening of the films, watch names such as David Attenborough, Bill Bryson and Sally Davies discuss their inspirational scientists from history.Using treasures from the Royal Society’s archive collections, the incredible stories of these amazing individuals are brought to life on screen, for the first time, by the extraordinary people who are continuing in their footsteps.This event is part of the 2018 Gravity Fields festival, Grantham.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

astronomyandphysics organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology chemistry chemistry festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

International

Are batteries the right option for a sustainable future?

International Lecture given by Professor Jean-Marie Tarascon ForMemRS.

Tuesday 25 September 2018

09/25/2018

09/25/2018

The development of improved rechargeable batteries represents a major technological challenge for this new century, as batteries constitute the limiting components in the shift from gasoline powered to electric vehicles, while also enabling the use of more renewable energy on the grid. To minimize the ecological implications associated with their wider use, we must integrate sustainability of battery components into our research endeavors. The challenges to developing batteries with minimal ecological footprints are enormous. They call for new materials and new concepts, as well as new chemical compositions. The presentation addressed these different aspects. Firstly, regarding new concepts, we will show how the discovery of a reversible lithium–driven anionic redox process among lithium-rich layered oxides represents a transformational approach for creating materials with exacerbated capacities.  Secondly, concerning sustainability, our new findings with the sodium ion chemistry which uses novel materials design together with the assembly of 18,650 prototypes were presented. Lastly, the future aspects of battery research was discussed. Attending the eventThis event has taken place.For all enquiries, please contact the Events team

Free Event

astronomyandphysics astronomyandphysics chemistry international pastevents

PAST EVENT

No series available.

How long until we have a robot for PM? Are the predictions about the future of work getting ahead of reality? Labour…

Tuesday 25 September 2018

09/25/2018

09/25/2018

Artificial intelligence has the potential to revolutionize the way that we live and work. While some predict this could usher in a new wave of hi-tech jobs, others warn of widespread job losses. But what predictions should we trust? Will accountants and lawyers be replaced by algorithms, or will new technologies help them work faster and smarter? Will our smartphones replace a trip to the doctor, or simply free them up to spend more time with each of their patients? Are politicians out of a job? What can policymakers do now to prepare for an unpredictable future?Join researchers and robots to unpick some of the assumptions that underpin predictions about how the world of work might change, and explore what we do – and don’t – know about the impact of AI on work. This event is supported by Imperial College London and we will share the findings of a joint British Academy and Royal Society report on AI and work. Chair: Ian Sample, Guardian Science EditorSpeakers:  Zeno the Robot Liam Byrne MP, Shadow Digital Minister Professor Nick Jennings FREng, Vice-Provost (Research and Innovation) Imperial College London Dr Claire Craig, Chief Policy Officer, the Royal Society Matthew Fell, Chief UK Policy Director, CBI  Anna Thomas, Founding Director, Institute for the Future of Work  Jason Brock, Changing Work Centre Commission on Workers and TechnologyAttending the event Free to attend No registration requiredFor all enquiries, please contact the Public Affairs team.

Free Event

pastevents

PAST EVENT

Party Conference

What has science ever done for me? Labour Conference

Tuesday 25 September 2018

09/25/2018

09/25/2018

Politicians are making challenging decisions on how to prioritise limited funds to improve people’s lives across the UK. Is research and innovation a good investment?The Government has committed to meet a target of 2.4% of GDP invested in UK R&D within ten years, and a longer-term goal of 3%. Delivering this ambition requires greater public and business investment in R&D. Now is the time for us to talk not just about the conditions that will encourage this investment, but how to spend smarter to improve people’s lives.Our speakers have personal stories that illustrate the wider public benefits of investment in research and innovation, from the obvious, such as new medicines and treatments, to the less expected, such as research-intensive start-ups creating local jobs and boosting local services. We will discuss why the 2.4% target matters not just to scientists and researchers but to everyone in society. We can all play a role in, and benefit from, delivering it together.Chaired by Professor Graeme Reid from University College London. Speakers include:  Chi Onwurah MP, Shadow Minister for Industrial Strategy, Science and Innovation Professor Richard Jones FRS, Industrial Strategy Commission & University of Sheffield Professor Bencie Woll, University College LondonThis event is hosted jointly with the Academy of Medical Sciences, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the British Academy.Attending the event Free to attend No registration requiredFor all enquiries, please contact the Public Affairs team.

partyconference pastevents

PAST EVENT

Open House

Open House 2018

A chance to explore the history and architectural highlights of Carlton House Terrace during Open House weekend, the home of the UK’s national academy of science.

22 – 23 September 2018

09/22/2018

09/23/2018

On 22 and 23 September 2018, the largest annual festival of architecture and design returns to the capital. Over the weekend, visitors are invited to discover the secrets of the Grade I listed, Nash-designed town houses that are home to the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence.What is Open House?Open House is a simple but powerful concept: hundreds of great buildings of all types and periods open up their doors to all, completely without charge. This unique opportunity to access and understand architecture is a chance to look at everyday buildings anew, and communicates the value of a well-designed city to everybody who uses it. For more information visit the Open House website.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.Take a virtual tour of the Royal Society .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Doors will open from 10am – 5pm on Saturday and Sunday. Last entry will be at 4.30pm Tours of the building can be booked free of charge upon arrival at the building As this is a popular event, please be prepared to queue Travel and accessibility information

London

Free Event

london openhouse pastevents

PAST EVENT

Party Conference

What has science ever done for me? Lib Dem Conference

Monday 17 September 2018

09/17/2018

09/17/2018

Politicians are making challenging decisions on how to prioritise limited funds to improve people’s lives across the UK. Is research and innovation a good investment?The Government has committed to meet a target of 2.4% of GDP invested in UK R&D within ten years, and a longer-term goal of 3%. Delivering this ambition requires greater public and business investment in R&D. Now is the time for us to talk not just about the conditions that will encourage this investment, but how to spend smarter to improve people’s lives.Our speakers have personal stories that illustrate the wider public benefits of investment in research and innovation, from the obvious, such as new medicines and treatments, to the less expected, such as research-intensive start-ups creating local jobs and boosting local services. We will discuss why the 2.4% target matters not just to scientists and researchers but to everyone in society. We can all play a role in, and benefit from, delivering it together.Chaired by Professor Graeme Reid, from University College London. Speakers include:  Norman Lamb MP, Chair of the Science and Technology Committee Layla Moran MP, Liberal Democrat Education Spokesperson Professor Andy Westwood, University of ManchesterThis event is hosted jointly with the Academy of Medical Sciences, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the British Academy.Attending the event Free to attend No registration requiredFor all enquiries, please contact the Public Affairs team.

partyconference pastevents

PAST EVENT

Conference

Science and the First World War: the aftermath

Thursday 13 September 2018

09/13/2018

09/13/2018

This one-day conference is part of a series of Europe-wide conferences on the history of science during the First World War.The focus will be on science and society in the later stages of WWI, and the longer-term consequences of conflict into the 1920s. Papers will examine how international scientific relationships, both personal and institutional, reasserted themselves – or perished – after the war. The conference will also look at war-related social change, and how European and other scientific academies acted to reunite, or divide, common activities along national lines.The conference is the third and final event in a series organised by the Leopoldina Academy, the Académie des Sciences and the Royal Society. This London event will be hosted by the Royal Society, in partnership with the British Society for the History of Science.Read the programme (PDF).Read the abstracts (PDF).Attending this event Registration essential £50 full fee / £30 student rate Travel and accessibility information

Free Event

conference pastevents

PAST EVENT

You And Ai

You and AI – The future of work

Join Professor Joseph E. Stiglitz, Nobel Laureate in economics and professor at Columbia University, to discuss how AI might affect work and working life, and how its benefits might be shared (or not) across…

Tuesday 11 September 2018

09/11/2018

09/11/2018

AI already supports many of the products and services we interact with on a daily basis, and technological advances are creating systems that can perform increasingly sophisticated tasks. Alongside these advances, come questions about the impact of AI on work and working life, and its implications for society. Will AI systems replace people in the workplace? How might these technologies affect how, where, and why we work? And how might this influence social inequalities?In the fifth discussion of the You and AI series, Professor Joseph E. Stiglitz will explore the implications of AI for your work and inequality, considering how we can share the benefits of these technologies across society. Professor Diane Coyle CBE, celebrated economist and professor of Public Policy at the University of Cambridge, will share her thoughts before joining Professor Stiglitz for what promises to be a lively question and answer discussion.This is an unparalleled opportunity for you to contribute to the conversation about this technology and the way it is becoming ingrained in every part of our lives.Please note: this is event is offered on a first-come, first-served basis. We recommend arriving early as we anticipate it to be very popular and can not guarantee admission.The You and AI series will culminate in two finale events in late 2018 in Manchester and London where Professor Jim Al-Khalili OBE FRS and Professor Brian Cox OBE FRS respectively will lead a public debate about these topics and issues. The events will be held on the 28 October 2018 (Manchester) and 11 December 2018 (London) and tickets will go on sale shortly. More details to follow.For all enquiries, please contact the Events Team.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Doors will open at 18:00 and seats will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis This event may be popular and entry cannot be guaranteed Live subtitles will be available British Sign Language interpretation will be available on request. Please let the Events Team know if you plan to attend at least two weeks before the event Travel and accessibility informationThe Royal Society’s aim is to make its events accessible to as many people as possible. This is why our events are free and offered on a first-come, first-served basis. 

youandai pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

The acoustic bubble: climate change, spaceships, dolphins, and the antibiotic apocalypse

Clifford Paterson Lecture 2018 given by Professor Timothy Leighton FMedSci FREng FRS

Wednesday 05 September 2018

09/05/2018

09/05/2018

Gas bubbles submerged in liquids are powerful sources and scatterers of sound fields. These effects are used to count bubbles; for example, the sound emitted by bubbles by the breaking waves of the ocean helps track atmospheric carbon transfer between the ocean and the air. Sound can also track methane released from the seabed into the atmosphere. In this talk, Professor Timothy Leighton discusses how these methods are implemented, and can further be used to predict sounds of liquid methane lakes on Titan, returning to Earth to explore the interaction between sound and bubbles used by whales and dolphins. Professor Leighton also looks at the potentials of bubbles and acoustics to combat infections in the fight against antibiotic resistance.The lecture will be webcast live and the video recording will be available shortly after the event.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Doors open from 18:00, and seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Live subtitles will be available British Sign Language interpretation will be available on request. Please let the Events team know if you plan to attend at least two weeks before the event. Travel and accessibility informationThe awardThe Clifford Paterson Medal and Lecture is given biennially (in odd years) to an outstanding researcher in the field of engineering.Professor Russell Cowburn FRS was awarded the Clifford Paterson Medal and Lecture 2016 for his remarkable academic, technical and commercial achievements in nano-magnetics.  Professor Polina Bayvel FREng was awarded the Clifford Paterson Lecture 2014 for her fundamental research in high bandwidth digital communications and nonlinear optics.For all enquiries, please contact the Events team

Free Event

prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Young People’s Book Prize Activity Day

Get creative with hands on family activities inspired by the shortlist of our 2018 Young People’s Book Prize.

Saturday 18 August 2018

08/18/2018

08/18/2018

Join us at the Edinburgh International Book Festival and take part in exciting drop-in activities inspired by the Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize shortlist. Surprising science experiments, arts and crafts and our fantastic 2018 shortlist await. Alongside the activities and our reading corner you will also have the unique opportunity to cast your vote for the winner of the prize, announced in November 2018.Attending this event Drop in anytime, 11am – 4.30pm Free, no registration required Family friendly, all ages welcome Event takes place in the Baillie Gifford Story Box room at the Edinburgh International Book Festival

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

You And Ai

You and AI – Machine learning, bias and implications for inequality

Join Kate Crawford, Distinguished Research Professor at New York University, a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research New York, and the co-founder and co-director the AI Now Institute, as she discusses the…

Tuesday 17 July 2018

07/17/2018

07/17/2018

Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) mean that computer systems can now give highly accurate predictions or recommendations, drawing insights from data in ways that were not previously possible and supporting new products or services. In some cases, AI is supporting decision-making situations that have a significant personal or social impact; whether it be informing judicial decisions in sentencing or parole, advising organisations about who to hire (or fire), or contributing to decisions about access to public services. Recent years have revealed a number of examples of the difficulties ensuring AI systems work well for everyone, and the subject of bias in AI is a growing area of interest for researchers and policymakers. But what can be done about it? In the fourth discussion of the You and AI series, Kate Crawford will explore how experts and researchers are confronting questions about bias, and formulating crucial strategies that might help overcome it. On the 11 September 2018, the fifth event in the series, Joseph E. Stiglitz, renowned economist, Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences winner and Professor at Columbia University, will explore the potential socioeconomic impacts of AI.The You and AI series will culminate in two finale events in late-2018 in Manchester and London where Professor Jim Al-Khalili OBE FRS and Professor Brian Cox OBE FRS respectively will lead a public debate about these topics and issues. The events will be held on the 28 October 2018 (Manchester) and 11 December 2018 (London) and tickets will go on sale shortly. More details to follow.The Royal Society’s aim is to make its events accessible to as many people as possible. This is why our events are free and offered on a first-come, first-served basis. For all enquiries, please contact the Events Team.

youandai pastevents

PAST EVENT

Conference

Royal Society ACME Mathematics Education Policy Conference 2018

Tuesday 17 July 2018

07/17/2018

07/17/2018

The Royal Society Advisory Committee on Mathematics Education held its 2018 conference on Tuesday 17 July.The conference, Working together: Mathematics education in a changing landscape, provided an opportunity to discuss current and emerging areas of mathematics education policy. Please see the conference programme (pdf) for further information about the day. Conference delegates discussed how different communities can work together to: facilitate progression in mathematics from early years to primary; enhance professional learner journeys for teachers of mathematics; strengthen post-16 mathematics pathways;  develop data science within mathematics; and  signal the value of mathematics across all phases of education.The conference welcomed a broad variety of guests from policy makers to researchers, teachers, employers, funders, professional associations and others.Keynote Address The Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss MP, Chief Secretary to the Treasury Paul Kett, Director General for Education Standards, DfEPanel Discussion: Signalling the value of mathematics: Making informed choices at all stages Dame Jil Matheson DCB (Chair) Professor Louise Archer, Professor of Sociology of Education, University College London Mr Josh Hillman, Director of Education, Nuffield Foundation Professor Mark Smith, Vice-Chancellor, Lancaster University Ms Amanda Spielman, Chief Inspector, OfstedWorkshop sessions4 workshop sessions focused on the following topics: Progression in mathematics from early years to primary Professional learner journeys for secondary teachers of mathematics Post-16 mathematics pathways for all: Challenges and Opportunities Rising to the data science challenges within new A-level Mathematics

London

Free Event

scientificareas london conference pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Sounds of space

Alien may have told you “In space no one can hear you scream” but it was wrong!

Sunday 08 July 2018

07/08/2018

07/08/2018

The SSFX (Space Sound Effects) project has challenged independent filmmakers from around the world to create short films incorporating a series of strange sounds from space. These noises have all been recorded by satellites, and are currently being studied by space physicists. The results are a collection of videos, spanning a wide array of topics and genres, connected only by these sounds.Hear from the scientists and filmmakers involved with the project in this dynamic discussion, and watch snippets of the highly creative results.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Women at war: science and suffrage

“The idea of ‘woman and science’ is completely irrelevant. Either a woman is a good scientist, or she is not.” Hertha Ayrton.

Sunday 08 July 2018

07/08/2018

07/08/2018

World War I was a time of great transformation in Britain. One of the most remarkable changes was the recognition for women to have the right to vote. A defining moment in history, it marked an important step in the fight for equality. Join historian of science Patricia Fara as we celebrate the centenary anniversary of the suffrage movement. Explore the difficulties faced by extraordinary women scientists to carve an identity for themselves in a country devastated by war. Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

The utterly revolting science show

Embark on a disgusting but utterly scientific journey through the human body with BBC gastronaut Stefan Gates.

Sunday 08 July 2018

07/08/2018

07/08/2018

A truly revolting multimedia adventure through the human body from head to bottom, exploring what really happens to a mouthful of food after you’ve eaten it, and bringing the world’s most disgusting science into the open. This session includes snot-eating, cooking with vomit and spit, lots of gut action, fluid dynamics of sphincters, the sensory perception of flatus, a huge vortex cannon firing smells around the auditorium and, of course, live on-stage excretion.Running timesThis event will run at 12pm, 2pm and 4pm and last approximately 45 minutes.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Tickets available one hour before event time Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Bugs vs boyfriends

Fed up of swiping left? Kissed more frogs than princes? Ever wondered if there’s a better way to find a mate?

Sunday 08 July 2018

07/08/2018

07/08/2018

Biologist Antonia Forster says there is… and suggests we take inspiration from the insect world.In this hilarious, fact-filled talk, we delve into the common misconceptions of bug life. Learn how ‘creepy’ crawlies can actually be romantic and sexy in a discussion that you will never forget.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

The mighty science trail

Join our intrepid explorer David Price (he’s the one wearing a pith helmet and holding a banner) as he tackles the mighty science challenges of St James’s Park.

Sunday 08 July 2018

07/08/2018

07/08/2018

Survive dodging ducks, bounding over bridges, wondering about water and fantasising over flowers to become the ultimate park ranger. No volunteers will be harmed on this science trail, honest.Running timesThis event will run at 11am, 12pm, 2.30pm, 3.30pm and 4.30pm and last approximately 30 minutes.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Tickets available one hour before event time Suitable for ages 7+ Unaccompanied children will not be permitted to take part in this tour Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Nanoinvasion

All around us as hidden world is taking over, it is a strange alien world where nothing is as it seems – the world of nanotechnology. 

Sunday 08 July 2018

07/08/2018

07/08/2018

Join materials scientist Dr Jamie Gallagher as we shrink down and get hands on with the tiny tech that is changing our phones, food, sport and health. Delve into a world where pencils are stronger than steel, metal becomes transparent and robots become doctors.Running timesThis event will run at 11am and 1pm and last approximately 45 minutes.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Tickets available one hour before event time  Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Accelerate

Join Suzie Sheehy and scientists from the University of Oxford on an explosive, interactive tour exploring the science behind atom smashers.

Sunday 08 July 2018

07/08/2018

07/08/2018

This award-winning show is packed with hair-raising demonstrations, explosions and real particle beams. If you’ve ever wondered how the Large Hadron Collider works, this is your chance to find out.Running timesThis event will run at 11am and 1pm and last approximately 45 minutes.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Tickets available one hour before event time  Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

What’s on Sunday 8 July

Sunday 08 July 2018

07/08/2018

07/08/2018

Along with the 22 exhibits of cutting-edge science, there’s plenty to see and do for kids and grown ups alike at the Summer Science Exhibition with an exciting programme of supporting activities and talks.Please see individual event pages for specific timings and further attendance information.Drop-in activities  Kids’ zone Tricks and twistsTicketed events – get your ticket on arrival at the exhibition The utterly revolting science show NanoinvasionTalks Sounds of space Bugs vs boyfriends: why insects are superior to humans Women at war: science and suffrage The mighty science trailAttending the exhibition Free to attend Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Travel and accessibility information  – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  These events are part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Tricks and twists

Baffle your mind with the puzzling tricks from our team of science buskers.

Sunday 08 July 2018

07/08/2018

07/08/2018

From guessing the hidden objects in the mystery bag of delights, to getting tied up in knots and putting your people skills to the test. The Francis Crick Institute’s science buskers will leave your brain in a twist with their simple demonstrations to amaze and inspire. Keep a look out for them roaming around the exhibition.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Kids’ zone

Ever wondered about the life cycle of stars? Or how your brain works?

Sunday 08 July 2018

07/08/2018

07/08/2018

Visit the Little House of Science team as we explore the answers to these questions and much more. With a series of exciting experiments and hands-on demonstrations, inquisitive young minds can experiment, explore and play in the Kids’ zone. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for children under 10 Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Tiny tumours and the fight against cancer

Can lab-grown mini-tumours help us to beat cancer?

Saturday 07 July 2018

07/07/2018

07/07/2018

Despite great progress in research in recent years, cancer still remains the second leading cause of death in the UK. Cutting edge techniques using ‘organoids’, three dimensional mini-tumours, are useful tools for investigating what drives the disease.Join the Wellcome Sanger Institute to find out about the applications of organoids in research. Discover how they can be used to model drug responses in patients and to identify the genes essential for survival. Using these techniques, we are searching for vital clues to answer the fundamental question: what causes cancer? Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Can arts ‘on prescription’ transform our health?

Join Dr Daisy Fancourt to discuss whether a culture fix can really help tackle health problems.

Saturday 07 July 2018

07/07/2018

07/07/2018

There is growing research showing the effects of arts and cultural engagement on health across the human lifespan: from lullabies helping premature babies to gain weight, to magic tricks improving hand function in hemiplegia and dance helping people with Parkinson’s disease to walk. In this talk, we will discover some of the most exciting research findings to date and explore how the arts are currently being rolled out ‘on prescription’ across the NHS.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Eco-explorers

Get up close to some of our planet’s most fascinating creatures in this hands-on family show.

Saturday 07 July 2018

07/07/2018

07/07/2018

Calling all brave explorers as we journey around the Earth to look at the changes that are impacting our precious wildlife and environment. Meet snakes, lizards, tarantulas and explore some of the super science that’s helping to protect the habitats of these amazing animals. Plus we will show how we can all live more sustainably to conserve our planet.Running timesThis event will run at 12pm, 2pm, and 4pm, lasting approximately 45 minutes.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Tickets available one hour before event time Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Out in STEM

Celebrate equality and diversity in science with our inspiring LGBT+ scientists.

Saturday 07 July 2018

07/07/2018

07/07/2018

With the Pride in London Festival taking place just around the corner, we are raising the awareness of LGBT+ issues and exploring the changes in equality and diversity within science. Join our panellists as they share their personal stories of what it is like to be out in science. Discuss the progress that has been already been achieved towards inclusion in STEM and look at the work that is yet to be done.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

The mighty science trail

Join our intrepid explorer David Price (he’s the one wearing a pith helmet and holding a banner) as he tackles the mighty science challenges of St James’s Park.

Saturday 07 July 2018

07/07/2018

07/07/2018

Survive dodging ducks, bounding over bridges, wondering about water and fantasising over flowers to become the ultimate park ranger.No volunteers will be harmed on this science trail, honest.Running timesThis event will run at 11am, 12pm, 2.30pm, 3.30pm and 4.30pm and last approximately 30 minutes.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Tickets available one hour before event time Suitable for ages 7+ Unaccompanied children will not be permitted to take part in this tour Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Real science or just bangs?

Matthew Tosh introduces you to the magical and explosive world of pyrotechnic science.

Saturday 07 July 2018

07/07/2018

07/07/2018

Discover the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) behind fireworks, and see how the professionals create colours, sound effects and perfectly timed bursts to music. Featuring shock waves, forces, energy pathways, electricity, fire, sparks, smoke and more. You’ll go behind‐the‐scenes and unpick the building blocks of modern‐day firework displays. Full of exciting demonstrations, this family show will have you on the edge of your seat.Running timesThis event will run at 11am, 1pm, and 3pm, lasting approximately 45 minutes.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Tickets available one hour before event time No late comers admitted to this event Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Human jukebox

Don’t you just hate it when a jukebox doesn’t have any tunes or poems about your favourite scientists?

Saturday 07 July 2018

07/07/2018

07/07/2018

Well fear not, the Royal Society Legends jukebox is here and, even better, there’s a friendly human behind it and it won’t even cost you a dime. So come say hello to the roaming human jukebox and select some sweet science jams to celebrate scientists from history.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

The science of crime

Grab your deerstalker hat and become a detective for the day in this interactive murder mystery workshop.

Saturday 07 July 2018

07/07/2018

07/07/2018

Learn all the skills required to became a great investigator, including fingerprinting, DNA and shoe pattern analysis. You will even be able to take away and analyse your own fingerprints. Run by The Detective Project, you will need your best problem solving and forensic know-how to help us solve our mysterious murder case.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

What’s on Saturday 7 July

Saturday 07 July 2018

07/07/2018

07/07/2018

Along with the 22 exhibits of cutting-edge science, there’s plenty to see and do for kids and grown ups alike at the Summer Science Exhibition with an exciting programme of supporting activities and talks.Please see individual event pages for specific timings and further attendance information.Drop-in activities  Kids’ zone The science of crime Human jukeboxTicketed events – get your ticket on arrival at the exhibition Real science or just bangs? Eco-explorers The mighty science trailTalks Out in STEM Can arts ‘on prescription’ transform our health? Hunting cancer by its fingerprintsAttending the exhibition Free to attend Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Travel and accessibility information  – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  These events are part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Kids’ zone

Ever wondered about the life cycle of stars? Or how your brain works?

Saturday 07 July 2018

07/07/2018

07/07/2018

Visit the Little House of Science team as we explore the answers to these questions and much more. With a series of exciting experiments and hands-on demonstrations, inquisitive young minds can experiment, explore and play in the Kids’ zone. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for children under 10 Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

What makes a psychopath?

Why do some people develop psychopathy?

Friday 06 July 2018

07/06/2018

07/06/2018

Join Professor Essi Viding as she examines a question that has long puzzled scientists and captured public imagination. Discover the science behind psychopathy, including the ground-breaking research that shows why some individuals are genetically vulnerable to developing this developmental disorder, and explore whether there is a way it can be prevented.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Tickets available one hour before event time  Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Lights, colours, camera, action

What do sweet wrappers, Pink Floyd and Darth Vader have in common?

Friday 06 July 2018

07/06/2018

07/06/2018

It’s light! From its humble origins from the stars, though to all the colours of the rainbow, the properties of light make dazzling natural phenomena. Join Robert Pal on a wonderful quest to understand light in all its glory. Chart the invisible by understanding the full spectrum from ultra violet to infra-red, and discover the importance of light in sun cream, glow-worms and fibre-optic broadband. Running timesThis event will run at 4pm and 5pm and last approximately 30 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Life drawing: the naked mole-rat

Release your inner artist in this life drawing workshop featuring some very unusual looking animals.

Friday 06 July 2018

07/06/2018

07/06/2018

Naked mole-rats are highly social mammals that have amazing physical adaptations, allowing them to thrive in hostile underground environments. Difficult to observe by the naked eye, real-time monitoring systems are a useful tool to help us gain insight into their behavioural patterns.In this drop-in session, you will learn about the wonderful world of the naked mole-rat and why these captivating creatures make fascinating subjects to study. Grab your sketching pens and pencils and discover their secret life under the soil. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

People of science

Who inspires you? Brian Cox takes this question to some of the most eminent figures in science in the Royal Society’s new flagship video series, People of science.

Friday 06 July 2018

07/06/2018

07/06/2018

In this special screening of the short films, watch names such as David Attenborough, Bill Bryson and Uta Frith discuss their most inspirational scientists from history. Using treasures from the Royal Society’s archive collections, the incredible stories of these individuals are brought to life on screen by the extraordinary people who are continuing in their footsteps.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

What’s on Friday 6 July

Friday 06 July 2018

07/06/2018

07/06/2018

Along with the 22 exhibits of cutting-edge science, there’s plenty to see and do for kids and grown ups alike at the Summer Science Exhibition with an exciting programme of supporting activities and talks.Please see individual event pages for specific timings and further attendance information.Drop-in activities  People of science Life drawing: the naked mole-ratTalks What makes a psychopath? Lights, colours, camera, actionAttending the exhibition Free to attend Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  These events are part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Ghosts of science past, present and future

Discover the untold tales of scientific achievement in this hilarious blend of history and comedy.

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

We’ll be visited by the Ghosts of Science Past, Present and Future (in the form of actual human scientists) for three side-splitting stand-up comedy gigs exploring the entertaining tales about where science has been and is going. From the obvious to the obscure, the influential to the unknown, our performers select their favourite figures and laughs will be plenty. Compèred by comedian and Wellcome Engagement Fellow Steve Cross.This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Running timesThis event will run at 7pm, 8pm and 9pm and last approximately 30 minutes.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Pastarama

Puzzle your senses with our molecular gastronomy take on the traditional pasta dish.

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

Picking out and eating food relies mainly on senses such as taste and sight. Our brain learns to recognise different foods based on appearance, and in turn we expect the taste to reflect this. So what happens when we mix things up to confuse expectations? Join our chefs as they mix up sweet and savoury to cook up some tasty culinary delights in an exploration into food science. From pioneering penne, tantalising tagliatelle and scrumptious spaghetti, you will be surprised with the delicious concoctions on offer. In addition, for one night only we are pairing up with materials scientist Mark Miodownik to take you on a journey through multisensory perception. At the 6.30pm, 7pm, 8pm and 8.30pm showings, you can take part in a real experiment to test your senses with the baffling yet delicious culinary delights on offer. Are sight and smell more powerful than taste? Explore how your brain processes sensory signals and how this influences your enjoyment of different types of food with this guided, interactive investigation into the senses.This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Tickets available one hour before event time Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Scientists under the spotlight

Many research projects go on for years, but tonight these researchers have only minutes to tell you all about their work.

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

Join us for a series of short talks throughout the night from Royal Society-funded researchers as they step into the spotlight to describe exactly what it is they’re doing and why. With only 10 minutes each, our researchers will deliver short, snappy titbits of science, giving you an insight into their work and an introduction to their field. From virtual calculus to virus hacks, our researchers cover it all.This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

What secrets lie below?

Discover the best kept secrets of the Royal Society archives.

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

In the depths below Carlton House Terrace lies a mind boggling collection of artefacts and records from the earliest times of scientific endeavour.For one night only our expert library team will share some of their favourites with you. From unusual objects and science fiction to stories about code breakers, this is an exclusive opportunity to explore some archival treasures and learn about our fascinating history.This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening.Running timesThis event will run at 6.30pm, 7pm, 7.30pm, 8pm, and 8.30pm.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Sing til you drop (part of Discovery hub)

Why does water break into droplets when it falls?

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

Understanding the properties of water has allowed us to create many useful technologies such as paint sprays, farming machinery and printers. We are able to use the reliable nature of droplets to our advantage and this can lead to some surprising behaviour.Dr Alfonso Castrejon-Pita’s research will show you how it is possible to control water with no more than your voice. Using a combination of light and sound, come along and drop a beat to stop water mid-drip. This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Make your own molecule (part of Discovery hub)

Find out about the importance of microbial DNA for shaping our planet.

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

Microbes have played a central role over geological time in creating the world we live in. The secret to how they have played a part can be unlocked by examining their DNA.Join Dr Patricia Sanchez-Baracaldo to learn how microbes are able to circulate nutrients around the globe. See if you can build DNA using only sweets and put your DNA replication and extraction skills to the test.This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Now you see me, now you don’t (part of Discovery hub)

Ever seen an object disappear before your very eyes?

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

Sometimes things may be right in front of you, but what you see is not always what you get. Dr Aliaksandra Rakovich and a team of researchers from KCL Physics explore how light can be manipulated and controlled, and how this is helping to address modern challenges in areas such as energy production and imaging. Learn what you would need to create a real invisibility cloak and make objects disappear by manipulating light to make the visible invisible.   This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Particles to planets (part of Discovery hub)

From particles and planets to CERN and the stars, a universe of unexpected discoveries awaits.

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

What does it mean to discover a particle? What is matter made of? Have we understood everything about the origin of our Universe and its building blocks? There’s only one place to find out… Discover the links between colliding particles and the Big Bang, what exoplanets are and how they were revealed and how the motion of planets influences the motion of stars with Dr Maria Ubiali and her team.This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Discovery hub

Meet some of the scientists and science funded by the Royal Society at this activity-filled hub of wonder.

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

You’ll get the chance to chat with the researchers and get a glimpse into their world of work. From chemists who make droplets dance, to physicists who make objects disappear, the Royal Society funds a plethora of top quality researchers who invite you to dabble in their scientific adventures. Could you make a molecule out of a balloon? Could you control water with only your voice? Come along and give it a go!This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Hacking a virus (part of Discovery hub)

Gene therapy offers a new hope to treat many devastating diseases, but how does it work?

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

Discuss how the therapy is tested for safety, what risks keep scientists worrying late at night, and what ethical issues arise from the ability to re-programme human cells, including cells in the brain.Dr Stephanie Schorge and her team show how normally dangerous viruses can be stripped of their own genes and hijacked to deliver healthy genes to human cells. You will also get the chance to hack a virus yourself.This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Science needs you

Could this be the future of scientific research?

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

Citizen science has become a large-scale platform for major scientific research and important discoveries, and provides a way for the public to help interpret huge data sets from the natural world.Join us to take part in real research projects alongside the scientists behind them. Find out how watching penguins can train machine learning, drones help us understand the plastic problem and how it’s possible to hold a universe in our hands. Transcribe historic scientific texts on the Royal Society’s own Science in the making platform. You will also have the opportunity map the sounds of the environment using just the sensors in your phone. This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Summer Science Exhibition Lates

Join us after hours to explore the Summer Science Exhibition and enjoy an evening of science, comedy, cocktails and also the England vs. Columbia match.

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

Our late night opening offers an exclusive and exciting programme of activities, alongside the opportunity to see 22 exhibits showcasing cutting-edge research in the main exhibition. From pioneering penne pasta to an exploration of citizen science, and comedy shows about forgotten contributions to bubbles and DNA sweet structures, this is an evening not to be missed for those with curious minds. For football fans, we will also be showing the England vs. Columbia match in the Events room in the Basement from 7pm.Attending the event Over-18s only We are operating a challenge 25 policy on the door and you may be required to show a valid form of ID to enter the event Free to attend No registration required Drinks and snacks will be available for purchase at our pop-up café Visitors will be required to show a valid form of ID before purchasing alcoholic beverages Doors open from 6pm This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please contact exhibition@royalsociety.org

London

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Calling all aspiring inventors

Put your creative skills to the test with our mini Longitude prize craft challenge.

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

To tackle the growing levels of antimicrobial resistance, the Longitude Prize challenges the public to create an affordable and effective test for bacterial infection.In our mini version, pick your sample of blood, phlegm or urine and build your own diagnostic tests from LEDs, kazoos, pipettes, pipe cleaners, and more! Can you meet the criteria and design something that will help address the problem? Enter your invention to win a giant microbe!This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Make your own molecule (part of Discovery hub)

Join Professor Mark Smales to find out how innovative protein based medicines are being made, and what we need to consider during the drug development process.

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

Many new medicines, like insulin, are protein based and are used to treat diseases for which there is no other cure. But these protein medicines are difficult to make, and expensive compared to other medicines. How can we make protein-based medicines of sufficient quality and quantity? Find out what’s being done to try and produce these valuable protein-based medicines as quickly as possible without increasing cost. Plus build your own balloon protein molecule. This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Dancing droplets and tartan paint (part of Discovery hub)

Prepare to be wowed by the hidden world of chemical behaviour, where you can race chemical droplets against each other and uncover the secret of how to stop bubbles from bursting.

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

By exploring the world of surface tension and unlocking its energy, the seemingly impossible suddenly becomes possible. Can you help droplets explore the world around them? Can you defeat the temple of bubble doom and capture the idol? Can you make water go uphill? All this and more from the exciting world of droplet-based chemistry.Dr Matthew Kitching brings the world of droplets alive with chemicals that are capable of moving entirely by themselves. This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Human jukebox

Don’t you just hate it when a jukebox doesn’t have any tunes or poems about your favourite scientists?

Tuesday 03 July 2018

07/03/2018

07/03/2018

Well fear not, the Royal Society Legends jukebox is here and, even better, there’s a friendly human behind it – and it won’t even cost you a dime! So come say hello to the roaming human jukebox and select some sweet science jams to celebrate scientists from history.This event is part of our Summer Science Exhibition Lates evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Summer Science Exhibition Lates is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2018For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Summer Science Exhibition 2018

02 – 08 July 2018

07/02/2018

07/08/2018

The Summer Science Exhibition is an annual showcase of exciting, cutting-edge science from across the UK. The week-long festival features 22 exhibits at the forefront of innovation. You can meet the scientists, try some of the hands-on activities or attend some fantastic talks and events. Attending this event  Free and open to all No registration requiredFind out more about the Summer Science Exhibition. For general enquiries, please contact exhibition@royalsociety.org. 

London

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PAST EVENT

International

Investigating the structure of molecules inside cells

International Lecture given by Professor Wolfgang Baumeister.

Thursday 21 June 2018

06/21/2018

06/21/2018

In the past, macromolecular structures have been characterized by methods requiring their isolation and purification. When taken out of their functional context, information about their interactions within the cellular environment is lost. However, it is the interaction between the many molecular species inhabiting cells which underlies cellular functions. Many of them exist only fleetingly or, when integrated in supramolecular complexes, these may be rooted so deeply in cells that they cannot be isolated without affecting their structural integrity. Professor Baumeister discussed a method, cryo-electrontomography, that has the unique potential to study the ‘molecular sociology’ of cells, combining the best structural preservation with 3D high resolution imaging.Attending the eventThis event has taken place.For all enquiries, please contact the Events team

Free Event

biochemistryandmolecularcellbiology biochemistryandmolecularcellbiology biochemistryandmolecularcellbiology international pastevents

PAST EVENT

You And Ai

You and AI – The emerging theory of algorithmic fairness: the challenges to making machines play fair

Join Cynthia Dwork, Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science at the Harvard Paulson School of Engineering, Radcliffe Alumnae Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and Affiliated Faculty at…

Monday 11 June 2018

06/11/2018

06/11/2018

Intelligent systems, much like humans, have the ability to see and respond to the world around them. Using data in new ways to make more accurate predictions or enabling new services, these machines offer the hope of overcoming the limitations of our own decision-making. However, with this they bring questions about how we make decisions, the influence of bias in decision making and how experts can ensure that key values – such as fairness – are built into AI systems.In the third discussion of the You and AI series, Cynthia Dwork will introduce the emerging theory of algorithmic fairness and the challenges experts face in ensuring that machines make objective decisions. This is a unique opportunity for you to join the conversation with a world-leader in the ethics and fairness of AI and machine learning.Upcoming events in the series at The Royal Society are: 17 July 2018: Kate Crawford, Distinguished Research Professor at New York University, a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research New York, and the co-founder and co-director the AI Now Institute, will discuss the biases built into machine learning, and what that means for the social implications of AI 11 September 2018: Joseph Stiglitz ForMemRS, renowned economist, Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences winner and professor at Columbia University, will explore the potential socioeconomic impacts of AIThe You and AI series will culminate in two finale events in late-2018 in Manchester and London where Professor Jim Al-Khalili OBE FRS and Professor Brian Cox OBE FRS respectively will lead a public debate about these topics and issues. The events will be held on the 28 October 2018 (Manchester) and 11 December 2018 (London) and tickets will go on sale shortly. More details to follow.The Royal Society’s aim is to make its events accessible to as many people as possible. This is why our events are free and offered on a first-come, first-served basis. For all enquiries, please contact the Events Team.

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Can materials science save us?

Imagine a world in which buildings harvest their own energy, bridges repair themselves and the clothes you wear can make you live longer.

Wednesday 06 June 2018

06/06/2018

06/06/2018

In his landmark Michael Faraday Prize lecture Professor Mark Miodownik OBE argues that only a proper understanding of materials science will allow us to navigate the future successfully, bringing huge benefits to society as a whole.Attending the event This event is taking place as part of the Cheltenham Science Festival Registration required Find travel and accessibility informationThis event is the 2017 Michael Faraday Prize lecture.For all enquiries, please contact: events@royalsociety.org

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PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Testosterone Rex – Cordelia Fine

A timely contribution to the gender debate, psychologist and author Cordelia Fine overhauls the idea that a single molecule could rule the gender divide. 

Saturday 02 June 2018

06/02/2018

06/02/2018

Fine uses the latest scientific evidence to challenge – and ultimately overturn – dominant views on both masculinity and femininity, calling for readers to rethink their differences and play their part in closing the gender gap. Fine was the winner of the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize in 2017, joining Stephen Hawking, Andrea Wulf, Jared Diamond and Stephen Jay Gould on a winners’ list dedicated to the best in science writing.Attending this event This event is taking place as part of the Hay Festival of Literature and Arts Registration required Find travel and accessibility informationFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

No series available.

The invention of nature – Andrea Wulf in conversation

Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859) was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age inspiring thousands, including a young Charles Darwin. Andrea Wulf’s latest book The Invention of Nature reveals…

Wednesday 30 May 2018

05/30/2018

05/30/2018

Find out more about the visionary German naturalist at our May Lates, with a presentation from Andrea followed by a conversation about Humboldt’s life and work with science journalist Gaia Vince. Andrea will be awarded the Dingle Prize from the British Society for the History of Science for the best history of science book for non-specialist readers. The prize-giving will be followed by a book signing with Andrea and Gaia. Copies of The Invention of Nature and Adventures in the Anthropocene: A Journey to the Heart of the Planet We Made will be available to purchase on the night.SpeakersAndrea Wulf is an award-winning author of several books. The Invention of Nature has won twelve literary awards, including Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize 2016. She has written for the Guardian, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and the Atlantic, among many others. She’s an International Fellow of the Explorer’s Club and a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. Gaia Vince is a journalist, broadcaster and author specialising in science, the environment and social issues. Gaia writes news, opinion and feature articles for a variety of different outlets, including the BBC, The Guardian, New Scientist, Australian Geographic, Science, Seed, along with researching and presenting science documentaries for BBC Radio. In 2015 her book Adventures in the Anthropocene won the Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books.Attending this event For all ticket enquires, please contact the Science Museum As this is part of the Science Museum Lates, entry is strictly for over 18s only Doors open at 6.45pm Please arrive at the museum at least half an hour before the start of this event Travel and accessibility informationFor all enquiries, please contact info@sciencemuseum.ac.uk

London

london pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Re-writing the Code of Life: CRISPR Systems and Applications of Gene Editing

Wednesday 30 May 2018

05/30/2018

05/30/2018

Gene editing with CRISPR technology is transforming biology. Understanding the underlying chemical mechanisms of RNA-guided DNA and RNA cleavage provides a foundation for both conceptual advances and technology development. Professor Jennifer Doudna ForMemRS will discuss how bacterial CRISPR adaptive immune systems inspire creation of powerful genome engineering tools, enabling advances in both fundamental biology and applications in medicine. She will also discuss the ethical challenges of some of these applications.The awardThe Croonian Medal Prize Lecture is the premier lecture in the biological sciences and is delivered annually at the Royal Society in London.Professor Jennifer Doudna ForMemRS was awarded the Croonian Medal and Lecture 2018 for her outstanding structural and functional studies of RNA and ribonucleoprotiens and for elucidating the molecular mechanism of the CRISPR-Cas9 system and developing it for genetic engineering.For all enquiries, please contact the Events team.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Festival Event

The next big thing

Rachel Lowe, Gemma Modinos and Hanna Sykulska-Lawrence discuss the next big thing.

Friday 25 May 2018

05/25/2018

05/25/2018

From the neuroscience of psychosis and planetary science to the socio-economic factors that predict the spread of disease, three Royal Society Research Fellows discuss their work at the forefront of science with climatologist and broadcaster Gabrielle Walker.Attending this event This event is taking place as part of the Hay Festival of Literature and Arts Registration required Find travel and accessibility information For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Why philosophy of science matters to science

In an era where science is increasingly specialised, what is the value of interdisciplinary research?

Monday 21 May 2018

05/21/2018

05/21/2018

In this lecture Professor Michela Massimi makes the case for research that crosses disciplinary boundaries.Philosophy of science is an interesting kind of interdisciplinary research at the junction between the sciences and the humanities. What good can philosophy do for science?Professor Michela Massimi argues that philosophy of science plays an integral role in scientific inquiry and a key social function. A socially responsible philosophy of science – which is not afraid to speak up for evidence, progress, and truth – best serves the needs of science in a tolerant, pluralist, and democratic society.Professor Michela Massimi was awarded the 2017 Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Medal in recognition of her work as a leading figure in the philosophy of science. Her work concentrates on the history and philosophy of modern physics, and the current debate between scientific realism and anti-realism. In 2018, she was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

No series available.

You and AI – AI Applications

Join Marcus Du Sautoy, mathematician, author, and science communicator, as he speaks to leading artificial intelligence experts for a discussion and open forum on AI’s applications. 

Thursday 03 May 2018

05/03/2018

05/03/2018

AI is affecting the public’s lives every day, in ways that might not at first be obvious or visible, with technologies and intelligence in AI constantly advancing, the impact and societal consequences, will only continue to grow. Alongside the benefits, this raises issues of data use and ethical boundaries. The talk is the second event in the Royal Society’s 2018 series: You and AI.  We have invited leading experts in big tech, academia and ethics to discuss the potential and pitfalls of advances in artificial intelligence and machine learning and what the future holds for AI and society.We invite you to the conversation, to hear from the greatest minds in the field and then add your thoughts, opinions and views at our two public question and answer sessions later this year.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

No series available.

You and AI – the history, capabilities and frontiers of AI

Join Demis Hassabis, world-renowned British neuroscientist, artificial intelligence (AI) researcher and the co-founder and CEO of DeepMind, to explore groundbreaking research driving the application of AI to…

Monday 30 April 2018

04/30/2018

04/30/2018

The talk launches the Royal Society’s 2018 series: You and AI, a collaborative effort to help people understand what machine learning and AI are, how these technologies work and the ways they may affect our lives.  Leading experts in the tech industry, academia and civil society will gather at the Royal Society to launch a flagship series of events designed to be an open and robust conversation about the potential and pitfalls of advances in artificial intelligence and machine learning.As one of the leading scientists in the field, Demis is ideally placed to provide an overview of AI and the potential future it offers to society.You & AI will be hosted on four dates at the Royal Society in London before moving to a large London arts venue and finally Manchester later in the year. We invite you to the conversation, to hear from the greatest minds in the field and then add your thoughts, opinions and views at our two public question and answer sessions later this year.Supported by Deep Mind

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Can we make rabies history? Realising the value of research for the global elimination of rabies

Leeuwenhoek Lecture 2018 given by Professor Sarah Cleaveland OBE FRS.

Tuesday 17 April 2018

04/17/2018

04/17/2018

Rabies is one of the world’s oldest-known, most terrifying and most deadly diseases.  Although the disease no longer poses a threat to public health in many wealthier parts of the world, tens of thousands of people in impoverished communities of Asia and Africa still die from rabies every year as a result of rabid dog bites.  International efforts are now focused on a global target of zero human deaths from dog-transmitted rabies by 2030.  This presentation describes how more than 100 years of rabies research provides cause for optimism as to the feasibility of canine rabies elimination but also highlights the need for realism in the path towards elimination, emphasising the importance of partnerships, political will, public engagement and perseverance. Research on rabies also has broader relevance to the control and elimination of several diseases of current concern to human and animal health, including emerging and neglected diseases, and exemplifies the benefits of taking of a “One Health” approach to disease control and prevention.The prize lecture will be webcast live and the video recording will be available shortly after the event.The awardThe Leeuwenhoek Medal and Lecture is awarded biennially. It was originally established to recognise excellence in the field of microbiology, bacteriology, virology, mycology and parasitology, and microscopy.Professor Sarah Cleaveland OBE FRS was awarded the Leeuwenhoek Medal and Lecture 2018 in recognition for her pioneering work towards the eradication of rabies throughout the world.For all enquiries, please contact the Events team.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

No series available.

Teacher retention seminar

Tuesday 20 March 2018

03/20/2018

03/20/2018

Following a similar event held in March 2017, the scientific learned societies (Association for Science Education, Institute of Physics, Royal Society, Royal Society of Biology and Royal Society of Chemistry) organised a seminar on teacher retention and wastage on Tuesday 20 March 2018, at the Royal Society. The seminar explored the latest evidence relating to current teacher retention rates, focusing predominately on science and mathematics.To learn more about the event, please read the Royal Society’s blog, In Verba.Teacher retention seminar programme March 2018Teacher retention seminar slide deck March 2018

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

International

Hope for people and the ocean

Royal Society International Lecture given by the Honourable Dr Jane Lubchenco ForMemRS

Thursday 15 March 2018

03/15/2018

03/15/2018

Can we use the ocean without using it up? The task is daunting given current trajectories in fisheries, plastics and other pollutants, and the increasingly serious impacts of climate change and ocean acidification. However, new scientific insights, tools, and partnerships are providing hope that it is not too late to transition to more sustainable practices and policies. Solutions exist, but they are not at the scale required. Dr Lubchenco will draw on her four years as the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and the Administrator of the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), her two years as the first US Science Envoy for the Ocean, and her decades of research around the world to summarise scientific knowledge about the importance of sustainable use of the ocean and approaches that are working. This lecture will bring a coupled message of urgency and hope.The lecture will be webcast live and the video recording will be available shortly after the event. Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Doors open from 18:00, and seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis This event may be popular and entry cannot be guaranteed Live subtitles will be available British Sign Language interpretation will be available on request. Please let the Scientific Programmes team know if you plan to attend at least two weeks before the event Travel and accessibility information For all enquiries, please contact the Scientific Programmes team. 

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Meeting the scientific and policy challenges of the Antarctic ozone hole: a global success story

Bakerian Lecture 2018 given by Professor Susan Solomon ForMemRS.

Thursday 08 March 2018

03/08/2018

03/08/2018

The discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole by the British Antarctic Survey shocked the world in 1985. Understanding of ozone depletion contributed to remarkable changes in policy as well as in environmental science and public understanding. In this talk, key aspects of the history of ozone science will be reviewed, including the contributions of chemistry, meteorology, and atmospheric physics. The interplay between science, public understanding and engagement, international policy, and technology that gave rise to an effective international process to rapidly phase out the production of ozone-depleting chemicals worldwide will also be explored. Finally, some ways in which science continues to advance the understanding of ozone depletion chemistry and contribute to environmental protection as the ozone layer begins to heal will be presented.The awardThe Bakerian Lecture series began in 1775 and is the premier lecture in the physical sciences.Professor Susan Solomon ForMemRS was awarded the Bakerian Medal and Lecture 2018 in recognition of her outstanding contributions in atmospheric science, in particular to the understanding of polar ozone depletion.For all enquiries, please contact the Events team.

Free Event

earthandenvironmentalsciences prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

The future of your genetic health

Recent developments in genetic technologies have accelerated us towards a new era of medicine.

Wednesday 07 March 2018

03/07/2018

03/07/2018

Personalised medicine is quickly moving from the realm of science fiction to everyday healthcare, whilst scientific ability to alter human genetics is growing every year, raising a range of ethical issues. How do we make sure that these developments are equally shared across society? What measures can be put in place to prevent patients being unfairly penalised for having certain genes?Join our expert panel as we discuss the medical and ethical implications of these new genetic technologies. The panel will include: Dr Robin Lovell-Badge CBE FRS, Stem Cell Geneticist, The Francis Crick Institute Dr Sarah Chan, Public Health Ethicist, The University of Edinburgh Dr Andrea Nemeth, Associate Professor, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of OxfordAttending this event Free and open to all No registration required Places are allocated on a first come, first served basis  Doors will open at 6pm Venue and accessibility informationFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org. 

London

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PAST EVENT

Conference

The CRISPR revolution: Changing life

Watch the conference footageRead the report

Wednesday 07 March 2018

03/07/2018

03/07/2018

The CRISPR revolution: Changing life will bring together experts from industry, academia and government to discuss the current state-of-the art in the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to understand biological pathways, to create cellular and animal models of disease, to develop improved agricultural crops and farm animals and to create new human therapies to correct somatic gene defects that lead to disease.Following rapid advances in the research laboratory the field is beginning to witness the first commercial applications of CRISPR/Cas9. This meeting will address the technical, regulatory and ethical challenges associated with the commercialisation of CRISPR modified crop and animal species, and with the development of novel gene therapies created through the use of genome editing technologies.See the programme below.Attending this eventThis open event is intended for participants from industry, academia and government who have an interest in genome editing.Contact the Industry team for more information.About the conference seriesThe conference is part of the Royal Society’s Transforming our future conferences in the life sciences, supported by AstraZeneca. This conference series was launched to address the major scientific and technical challenges of the next decade and beyond. Each conference will focus on one topic and will seek to cover key issues, including: The current state of the key industry sectors involved The position of the UK and how it can benefit from the technology The future direction of research The challenges faced in turning research into commercial success The skills base needed to deliver major economic scientific advances The wider social and economic impactsThe conferences are a key component of the Society’s five-year Science, Industry and Translation initiative which demonstrates our commitment to reintegrate science and industry at the Society and to promote science and its value by connecting academia, industry and government.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Cafe Scientifique

How the quantum world makes the impossible possible

Join us to explore the dizzying possibilities of the quantum world. 

Monday 26 February 2018

02/26/2018

02/26/2018

Quantum theory, our attempt to describe the behaviour of the very smallest scales in the universe, is littered with counter-intuitive predictions.Many, like the idea of an object being in two places at once, are impossible scenarios in our classical understanding of the world, but are nevertheless present and predictable at quantum scales.Join Dr Paul Skrzypczyk to explore the limits of this contradictory world and discover how we might put its impossibilities to use.What is a Café Scientifique?A Café Scientifique is an informal dialogue-based event with a scientist. A short talk by the speaker is followed by audience questions, an interactive activity and discussion for the rest of the event.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

London

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

The Michael Faraday Prize Lecture 2017

The relationship between society and materials is most obviously demonstrated in the naming of ages of civilisations, such as the Stone Age, Bronze Age, and the Iron Age.

Tuesday 20 February 2018

02/20/2018

02/20/2018

Despite the long history of materials development, materials science as a distinct discipline only came of age in the 20th century. It was brought into existence as a result two developments. Firstly, society needed to understand complex materials, on which it was becoming ever more dependent such as the silicon chip, jet engine alloys, plastics, optical fibres, medical implants, etc. Secondly, it became increasing clear that materials could not be understood by the study of physics, chemistry or biology alone.Materials science in the 21st century is making a world possible where buildings harvest their own energy, bridges repair themselves, and clothes increase life expectancy by monitoring health. Many possible realities are possible, each driven by different cultural and economic forces. We could find ourselves in the grip of mass migrations, with declining life expectancy, and dealing with global pollution. Which future will we choose? In this lecture, Professor Miodownik argues that only a deeper understanding of materials science will allow us to navigate the future successfully.This event is the 2017 Michael Faraday Prize lecture.For all enquiries, please contact: events@royalsociety.org

London

london prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

To be a machine

Discover the thought-provoking world of transhumanism with author and journalist Mark O’Connell.

Sunday 18 February 2018

02/18/2018

02/18/2018

From individuals who are enhancing their bodies with technology to immortalists trying to ‘solve’ the problem of death, we uncover the futuristic movement that questions what next for humankind.To be a machine was shortlisted for the 2017 Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize. For more information, visit royalsociety.org/sciencebookprize. This event is part of a series of Royal Society events taking place at the 2018 Northern Ireland Science Festival.Attending this event Ticket is required £3 per ticket Suitable for 14+ Tickets are available from the Festival websiteFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Resilient oceans in a changing world

Journey into the deep to discover how our oceans are adapting to a changing world.

Sunday 18 February 2018

02/18/2018

02/18/2018

Whether from overfishing, our growing population or a rapidly changing climate, the oceans and the abundance of life within them are under threat. Join our expert panel to discuss the impact of humanity on our blue planet and discover how we can build resilience in this rich and fascinating ecosystem.Panellists currently confirmed: Professor Callum Roberts, Marine Conservation Biologist, University of York Dr Carol Turley, Senior Scientist, Plymouth Marine Laboratory  Dr James Strong, Senior Scientist Marine Geoscience, National Oceanography CentreThis event is part of a series of Royal Society events taking place at the 2018 Northern Ireland Science Festival.Attending this event Ticket is required £3 per ticket Suitable for 14+ Tickets are available from the Festival websiteFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Science books activity day

Get creative with hands-on family activities inspired by some incredible science books.

Saturday 17 February 2018

02/17/2018

02/17/2018

Join us for exciting arts and crafts and surprising science experiments. Browse the fantastic books and find out how you and your school can help us decide next year’s winner. The books featured in this event were shortlisted for the Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize 2017.This event is part of a series of Royal Society events taking place at the 2018 Northern Ireland Science Festival.Attending this event Registration is recommended Free to attend Suitable for ages 6-14 years Tickets are available from the Festival websiteFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

Free to attend

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

No series available.

Film screening: The man who knew infinity

Friday 16 February 2018

02/16/2018

02/16/2018

Join us at the Science Museum, where the Society’s President Sir Venki Ramakrishnan PRS and Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize shortlisted author Eugenia Cheng will be discussing the brilliance of Srinivasa Ramanujan FRS and the impact of his work to Indian culture and modern mathematics.The conversation will be chaired by science author and broadcaster Dr Roger Highfield. This discussion of his life and legacy will follow an IMAX screening of The man who knew infinity – the 2016 biopic starring Dev Patel and Jeremy Irons.Attending this event This event is now sold out, please contact the Science Museum for any queries regarding ticketing Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open at 6.00pm Travel and accessibility informationFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

London

Sold out

london pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Science books activity day

Get creative with hands-on family activities inspired by some incredible science books.

Friday 16 February 2018

02/16/2018

02/16/2018

Join us for exciting arts and crafts and surprising science experiments. Browse the fantastic books and find out how you and your school can help us decide next year’s winner. The books featured in this event were shortlisted for the Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize 2017.This event is part of a series of Royal Society events taking place at the 2018 Northern Ireland Science Festival.Attending this event Registration is recommended Free to attend Suitable for ages 6-14 years Tickets are available from the Festival websiteFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

Free to attend

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

No series available.

The science of belief

Join Professors Colin Blakemore and Tom McLeish as they discuss how science is itself at the heart of being human, and can be traced back through art, philosophy and ancient stories, including those in religious…

Friday 26 January 2018

01/26/2018

01/26/2018

Humans, through time and across the world, have consistently expressed patterns of believing and belonging through shared narrative and practice.In this discussion, chaired by award-winning journalist, writer and BBC broadcaster Samira Ahmed, scientists Colin Blakemore and Tom McLeish examine how the cognitive impetus that drove the emergence of science might be considered to be the same impetus that fostered religion and other metaphysical beliefs.This conversation will be chaired by award-winning journalist, writer and BBC broadcaster Samira Ahmed and is hosted in partnership with the British Museum as part of their ‘Living with gods’ exhibition.Attending this event This event is now sold out, please contact the British Museum for details on cancellations Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open at 6.00pm Travel and accessibility informationFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

London

Sold out

london pastevents

PAST EVENT

No series available.

TEDxWhitehall

Thursday 25 January 2018

01/25/2018

01/25/2018

TEDxWhitehall brought together over 180 researchers, civil servants, policy makers and others from 46 individual institutions. The day included live speakers and performances, a selection of TEDx and Royal Society videos, as well as an art exhibition. TEDxWhitehall’s theme was inspired by the Society’s Changing Expectations project, which is part of the ambitious Research culture programme. It succeeded in meeting TEDx aims to foster learning, inspiration and wonder, and in provoking conversations that matter around the theme of Changing Expectations. Audience members came away having made new connections both within their work and with each other. The day concluded with a celebration of the launch of Research culture: embedding inclusive excellence, a document which captures the insights and ideas generated through these workshops as part of a national conversation. This document will be the foundation upon which the Research culture programme will build, leading up to a landmark conference in autumn 2018.

London

london pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

The birth of a new species: Bringing together, yet driving apart

The Francis Crick Prize Lecture 2017 was given by Professor Simon Myers.

Wednesday 06 December 2017

12/06/2017

12/06/2017

There are millions of different species worldwide. But how do new species first appear, and then remain separate?In many cases, hybrid offspring between closely related species are infertile or inviable, preventing intermixing. However, the mechanism behind this problem is not well understood. In fact only one “speciation” gene has so far been found in mammals. This gene, Prdm9, drives infertility in hybrid mice. In most mammals, including humans,  Prdm9 also controls recombination, the shuffling of genetic material from parents to their offspring. With mutation, recombination creates all genetic variation.Random genetic changes to Prdm9 can “reverse” speciation, restoring fertility to previously infertile hybrids.  Although how this happens has been mysterious, disruption of recombination in infertile hybrids reveals how Prdm9 places a series of “signposts” in the genome.This lecture discusses collaborative work deciphering this case of mammalian speciation, by combining experimental and statistical approaches. The awardThe Francis Crick Lecture is given annually in any field in the biological sciences. Preference is given to genetics, molecular biology and neurobiology, the general areas in which Francis Crick worked, and to fundamental theoretical work, which was the hallmark of Crick’s science.Professor Simon Myers was awarded the 2017 Francis Crick lecture for transforming our understanding of meiotic recombination and of human population history. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

London

Free Event

biochemistryandmolecularcellbiology biochemistryandmolecularcellbiology london prizelecture pastevents

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History Of Science

The genius and legacy of Michael Faraday

Explore Faraday’s incredible story with pioneering chemist Sir John Meurig Thomas FRS.

Monday 04 December 2017

12/04/2017

12/04/2017

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of Michael Faraday’s death, Sir John takes us back to the 19th century to explore one of the most influential scientists in history. We discovered Faraday’s lasting legacy including his ground-breaking work on electricity and magnetism and discussed how his passion for communicating helped increase public interest in the sciences and define scientific engagement for decades to come. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

London

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History Of Science

Collections by candlelight

Join our festive late night opening and discover the incredible history of the UK’s academy of science.  Discuss the electrifying Michael Faraday, try your hand at still drawing and screen-printing of images from…

Monday 04 December 2017

12/04/2017

12/04/2017

Attending this event Free to attend No registration required Doors open at 6.30pm Travel and accessibility information can be found on our website Drinks will be available for purchase at our pop up bar Visitors will be required to show a valid form of ID before purchasing alcoholic beveragesFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.Event programmeHidden treasures 6.30pm – 9.30pmGet your artistic juices flowing and explore some of the amazing artefacts from our archives in this still life drawing workshop. Printmaking through the ages 6.30pm – 9.30pmCreate your own screen print of images from the Royal Society’s collections including Micrographia, Kunstformen der Natur and De Historia Piscium (The History of Fish). Containing some of the most unusual and striking illustrations from scientific literature, expect this workshop to be hands-on, beautiful and inky.Who ate all the pies? 6.30pm – 10pm Dabble with gastronomy in this festive food hall and try our take on the classic mince pie. Tantalise your taste buds with the sweet, savoury or ‘twist of science’ varieties on offer and wash them down afterwards with a special festive cocktail.Forgotten books 7pm, 8pm, 9pmDiscover some of the fascinating scientific literature from history that you would never have heard about.The Royal Society’s prize for science books has been celebrating outstanding popular science writing for 30 years, but that leaves over four thousand years of unrewarded science books. From the obvious to the obscure, the influential to the dead ends, we combine history and comedy as our performers select their favourite ‘forgotten’ science books. For more information about the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize, visit royalsociety.org/sciencebookprizeTales of science past 7pm – 9.30pmWhich scientist saved the Christmas carol? Do ghosts linger around the halls of the Royal Society?Uncover the untold secrets of some of the science greats with this drop-in story-corner, run by our expert library team. Stories run every half an hour. The genius and legacy of Michael Faraday 7.30pm – 8.30pmTo commemorate the 150th anniversary of his death, pioneering chemist Sir John Meurig Thomas FRS takes us back to the 19th Century to explore one of the most influential scientists in history. Faraday, more then any other individual created the modern world of communication. Discover his lasting legacy including his pioneering work on electricity and magnetism and discuss how his passion for communicating helped increase public interest in the sciences and define scientific engagement for decades to come.

London

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No series available.

The wisdom of the crowd

Join Professor Marcus du Sautoy OBE FRS for interactive experiments exploring the power of crowds in answering certain numerical questions.

Wednesday 29 November 2017

11/29/2017

11/29/2017

From guessing the weight of a cow or the number of sweets in a jar, there is evidence that the average of a crowd’s guesses can deliver surprisingly accurate results.Professor du Sautoy carried out a number of live interactive quizzes and experiments to test these ideas and look at how these principles can be harnessed for citizen science projects.This event was hosted in partnership with the University of Oxford as part of the AHRC’s Constructing Scientific Communities project. Visit conscicom.org to discover more.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

London

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Prize Lecture

How can a computer understand what is happening in a video?

Wednesday 22 November 2017

11/22/2017

11/22/2017

2017 Milner Award Lecture given by Professor Andrew Zisserman FRS.How can a computer recognise people and what they are doing and saying in a video stream? The answer is by learning, and learning can take many different forms. One form is known as ‘strong supervision’: this is when a computer is shown many (thousands) of examples of a person or the action they are doing, and from this it learns a model to classify the video.  Another form of learning is known as ‘weak’ or ‘self-supervision’: this is when the computer learns directly from the structure of a video stream.This lecture explains how both forms of supervision can be used to train neural networks using deep learning. It is illustrated throughout with examples including: recognising people by their faces, recognising human actions, automated lip reading, and using both sound and images in concord for training.The Award The Royal Society Milner Award, kindly supported by Microsoft Research, is given annually for outstanding achievement in computer science by a European researcher. The award replaces the Royal Society and Académie des sciences Microsoft Award and is named in honour of Professor Robin Milner FRS (1934-2010), a pioneer in computer science.Professor Andrew Zisserman FRS was awarded the 2017 Milner Award in recognition of his exceptional achievements in computer programming which includes work on computational theory and commercial systems for geometrical images. For all enquiries, please contact the Scientific Programmes team.

Free Event

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Conference

Annual Diversity Conference 2017

Thursday 16 November 2017

11/16/2017

11/16/2017

This year, the Society’s Annual Diversity Conference will explore ways to remove barriers to participation in STEMM education.Sir Venki Ramakrishnan, President of the Royal Society, gave a welcome address at the conference, in which he urged greater efforts to identify barriers to inclusivity and to breaking down those barriers. Full speech is available here.For all enquiries, please contact diversity@royalsociety.org

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Cafe Scientifique

How do plants grow?

Discover the fundamental mechanisms behind the growth of plants.

Monday 06 November 2017

11/06/2017

11/06/2017

Plant growth is underpinned by complex networks of molecular interactions, all contributing to the astounding diversity and beauty we see in our parks, gardens, farms and fields. Dr Rucha Karnik to discussed how we’re getting to grips with these mechanisms and how they might help us create more efficient, resilient crops.An audio recording of this event will be available soon.Please direct enquiries to events@royalsociety.org

London

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Local Heroes

Mackerel scales and mare’s tails

Throughout 2017 Stromness Museum is celebrating the life and work of Charles Clouston, one of the founding members of the Orkney Natural History Society, through a series of exciting events. 

04 November – 30 March 2018

11/04/2017

03/30/2018

This winter exhibition will explore Clouston’s meteorological work on the science and folklore of weather. Attending this event Open to all Museum entry fees apply Please contact Stromness Museum for further details. Local HeroesThis event is held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org.

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No series available.

Meteorite hunt

Spotting​ ​rocks​ ​from​ ​space is​​ easy​ ​when​ ​​they’re still​ hurtling​ through ​​the ​​sky.​ ​But​ ​once​ ​they’ve landed, how​ can we​ tell them from​​ other​ boulders,​ stones​ or​ pebbles?

Monday 23 October 2017

10/23/2017

10/23/2017

​Try​ ​out​ ​some​ ​space​ sleuthing​ ​yourself​ ​by​ ​trying​ ​out​ ​the​ ​tricks​ ​and​ ​techniques ​used​ by​ astro-geologists ​​from the Earth​ ​and​ ​Solar​ ​System​ ​team​ ​at​ ​the​ ​University​ ​of​ Manchester.Drop in anytime for this daytime workshop which is taking place as part of the Manchester Science Festival’s Platform for Investigation workshop series.Attending this event Family friendly Free to attend No registration required Travel and accessibility informationFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

London

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Prize Lecture

Why do some people become psychopaths?

Rosalind Franklin Lecture 2017 by Professor Essi Viding.

Thursday 19 October 2017

10/19/2017

10/19/2017

Psychopathy has long captured the public imagination. Newspaper column inches and Hollywood films alike mirror our curiosity and capture our natural fear of characters who seem to lack basic humanity.  Why do some people develop psychopathy and can it be prevented? We now understand psychopathy as a developmental disorder characterised by lack of empathy and guilt, manipulation of other people and premeditated violence. Research has demonstrated that some individuals are genetically vulnerable to developing psychopathy and display atypical brain responses to other people’s distress and social affiliative cues. These insights suggest why the typical socialisation processes can derail in those at risk for psychopathy, but also indicate what might be helpful in preventing the condition.The awardThe Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture is awarded annually and is made to support the promotion of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.Professor Essi Viding was awarded the Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture 2017 for her achievements in the field of experimental psychology, her ability to communicate with the public and her imaginative project proposal.For all enquiries please contact the Events team

Free Event

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The Seabird’s Cry

Professor of Ornithology Tim Birkhead FRS was joined by historian and writer Adam Nicolson FRSL to explore how to re-associate the analytical and imaginative aspects of understanding animals. Can we move beyond…

Monday 16 October 2017

10/16/2017

10/16/2017

World seabird populations have reduced by a third since 1950. Conservationists and scientists have the monumental task of trying to turn the tide of mass extinction of species. To capture the public’s imagination on this issue, how can writers and scientists work together to help the cause?Tim Birkhead is a zoologist of behaviour and evolution at the University of Sheffield, whose books Bird Sense and The Most Perfect Thing have both been previously shortlisted for the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize. Adam Nicolson is a prizewinning author of books about history, landscape, literature and the sea. His latest book The Seabird’s Cry is published this summer. Their conversation was chaired by science writer and broadcaster Claudia Hammond and was hosted in partnership with the Royal Society of Literature.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

London

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No series available.

The evolution of science writing

Join winners and judges of the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize past and present at the Hull Literary Festival. 

Sunday 08 October 2017

10/08/2017

10/08/2017

It’s the 30th anniversary of the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize, and the 25th anniversary of Humber Mouth. No better time to talk about the past, present and future of science writing. Join our exciting panel of past prizewinners and judges as they discuss the evolution of science writing over the past thirty years, and how it could evolve over the next thirty. Includes a special appearance by one of the 2017 shortlist.To buy tickets for this event, please visit the Humber Mouth website. For all enquiries, please contact sciencebooks@royalsociety.org.Our 2017 shortlisted books are:  Beyond Infinity: An Expedition to the Outer Limits of the Mathematical Universe by Eugenia Cheng  Testosterone Rex: Unmaking the Myths of Our Gendered Minds by Cordelia Fine  Other Minds: The Octopus and the Evolution of Intelligent Life by Peter Godfrey-Smith  In Pursuit of Memory: The Fight Against Alzheimer’s by Joseph Jebelli  To Be a Machine: Adventures Among Cyborgs, Utopians, Hackers, and the Futurists Solving the Modest Problem of Death by Mark O’Connell  I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong  Find out more about the Royal Society Insight investment Science Book Prize, our current shortlist and how we are celebrating our 30th anniversary.

£7 / £5 concessions

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Festival Event

Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize Activity Day

Sunday 08 October 2017

10/08/2017

10/08/2017

Get creative with hands on family activities inspired by the shortlist of the Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize 2017. Join our scientists from the University of Hull for an afternoon filled with fun and take part in exciting drop-in activities, surprising science experiments, arts and crafts and browse the fantastic 2017 shortlist. Once you have had a look at all the books, you will also have the unique opportunity to cast your vote for the winner of the prize, announced in November 2017.Attending this event Free event, no registration required Most suitable for under 10s For accessibility information, please contact Hull Central Library Contact sciencebooks@royalsociety.org for more information How can I get involved in the Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize?The Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize celebrates the best books that get young people under 14 engaged with science and reading. Once a shortlist of 6 books is chosen by a panel of experts, we send the books to schools and youth groups across the country, who judge the books and tell us their winner. The groups can be formed anywhere, from schools to science centres and scouts/brownies to youth groups. The winner is announced at an award ceremony each November.Applications to assemble a group to take part in the 2018 prize will open in January 2018. Please visit Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize for more information or contact us at sciencebooks@royalsociety.org to be reminded of the call for entries. 

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Future ocean resources at Science Uncovered

Join us at the Natural History Museum to explore the frontiers of ocean science.

Friday 29 September 2017

09/29/2017

09/29/2017

The ocean is valued by people around the world for food, energy, transport and recreation, but how might we use it in the future?Join our experts at the Natural History Museum and discover the possibilities for future ocean resources over a drink. Get hands-on with samples and chat to scientists whilst exploring our interactive map.This event is part of Science Uncovered for European Researchers’ Night. Free and open to all Spaces limited for some activities Tickets for special activities will be available on the night on a first-come first-served basis Find out more on the Natural History Museum’s website.Please direct enquiries to events@royalsociety.org

London

Free Event

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Inspiring science books of 2017 with Brian Cox

We joined Professor Brian Cox to look at the best science writing of 2017, and announce this year’s winning book.

Tuesday 19 September 2017

09/19/2017

09/19/2017

The event explored the shortlist from the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize and discovered the most inspirational popular science books and authors of the year. Selected from hundreds of entries, our six shortlisted books tackle some of life’s biggest questions ranging from human enhancement and gender identity to the evolution of intelligent life. Gain insight into the latest scientific thinking and learn about the complexity of the ecosystems inside us, the puzzling concept of infinity or the current struggles in Alzheimer’s research.  The event discussion, hosted by Professor Brian Cox, featured some of the inspiring authors behind these literary works. Questions were taken to the panel and we learnt about their influences, and how a good science book can have the power to change lives. Kindly supported by Insight Investment.For all enquiries, please contact sciencebooks@royalsociety.org.Our 2017 shortlisted books are:  Beyond Infinity: An Expedition to the Outer Limits of the Mathematical Universe by Eugenia Cheng  Testosterone Rex: Unmaking the Myths of Our Gendered Minds by Cordelia Fine  Other Minds: The Octopus and the Evolution of Intelligent Life by Peter Godfrey-Smith  In Pursuit of Memory: The Fight Against Alzheimer’s by Joseph Jebelli  To Be a Machine: Adventures Among Cyborgs, Utopians, Hackers, and the Futurists Solving the Modest Problem of Death by Mark O’Connell  I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong Find out more about the Royal Society Insight investment Science Book Prize, our current shortlist and how we are celebrating our 30th anniversary.  

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Local Heroes

Dean R. Lomax – Making dreams reality

Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery celebrate a modern day local science hero – Doncaster-born Dean Lomax, palaeontologist and honorary scientist at the University of Manchester. The museum follows the story from…

Saturday 16 September 2017

09/16/2017

09/16/2017

Join the museum to celebrate the end of their exhibition with this special day of events and activities. Come along, interact with the museum collection and get hands on with palaeontology and fossil hunting.Attending this event Free to attend Tickets required for some activities and will be released 3 weeks prior to the event Please contact Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery for further ticketing informationLocal HeroesThis event is held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

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Open House

Open House 2017

A chance to explore the history and architectural highlights of Carlton House Terrace during Open House weekend, the home of the UK’s national academy of science.

16 – 17 September 2017

09/16/2017

09/17/2017

On 16 and 17 September 2017, the largest annual festival of architecture and design returned to the capital. Over the weekend, visitors were invited to discover the secrets of the Grade I listed, Nash-designed town houses that are home to the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence.What is Open House?Open House is a simple but powerful concept: hundreds of great buildings of all types and periods open up their doors to all, completely without charge. This unique opportunity to access and understand architecture is a challenge to look at everyday buildings anew, and communicates the value of a well-designed city to everybody who uses it. For more information visit the Open House website.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.Take a virtual tour of the Royal Society .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

London

Free Event

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History Of Science

Adventures in the Indo-Pacific

Find out how Joseph Banks’ expeditions paved the way for our understanding of the natural world. 

Thursday 14 September 2017

09/14/2017

09/14/2017

We discovered how Banks documented and protected important species in the Indo-Pacific, inspiring future generations of scientists, including Charles Darwin and Joseph Hooker. Our expert panel discussed the effect of Banks’ voyages and looking at how they set the foundations for our understanding of climate change and the protection of fragile ecosystems like the Great Barrier Reef.Speakers included: Professor Iain McCalman, Professor of History, University of Sydney and co-Director of the Sydney Environment Institute Professor Kathy Willis, Director of Science, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew Dr Rebekah Higgitt, Senior Lecturer in History, University of Kent Dr Simon Werrett, Senior Lecturer in History and Philosophy of Science, UCLFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

London

Free Event

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Conference

Joseph Banks: Science, Culture and Exploration, 1743-1820

14 – 15 September 2017

09/14/2017

09/15/2017

In a career spanning more than fifty years, Joseph Banks became one of the most influential figures in European science.  Through his participation in James Cook’s first Pacific voyage (1768-71), Banks received much of the credit for descriptions of a ‘new’ and exotic oceanic world that fascinated Europe and which would come to influence the course of European and Pacific science, culture, politics and commerce.  After that he only made one more scientific voyage – to Scotland and Iceland – but as President of the Royal Society from 1778 to his death in 1820, he would spend the remainder of his career supporting expeditions and forging networks that brought together Atlantic, Indian and Pacific worlds.With the support of an Arts and Humanities Research Council Network grant, this conference has been organized by a collaborative partnership between the National Maritime Museum, University College London, the Royal Society, National Portrait Gallery, Natural History Museum and the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew. This will be the culmination of an 18-month Network project exploring the intersections of Enlightenment science, culture, commerce and empire through the figure of Joseph Banks, his correspondents, circles and networks. Professor David Igler (University of California, Irvine) and Professor Kapil Raj (Centre Alexandre-Koyré, Paris) are the two keynote speakers. With speakers from a range of disciplines, the conference reflects new research on the global contexts of Banks’s interests, influence and legacies.Download the conference programme (PDF)Read the conference abstracts (PDF).For more information about the wider programme of activities of the Joseph Banks Network, please see www.rmg.co.uk/josephbanksnetwork.Saturday 16 September – Royal Botanic Gardens KewThe formal proceedings of the conference will take place at the Royal Society on 14 and 15 September and will be followed by an informal study visit to the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew on Saturday 16 September to view Banks related material. More details of the Kew visit can be found on the conference programme (PDF).Bursaries With the generous support of the Arts and Humanities Research Council, we are able to encourage the participation of postgraduates and early career researchers working in cognate areas by inviting applications for bursaries from both the UK and overseas. The bursaries will support part or all of travel and accommodation expenses for attendance at the conference: up to a maximum of £250 for UK applicants and up to £500 for overseas applicants. Successful applicants for a bursary will be expected to attend the conference and write a 500-word blog posting on the proceedings. Payment will be made in arrears.Please send a CV, a paragraph on why you would like to attend and how much money you would like to apply for (with details of what that would cover).  Email to: Sally Archer on sarcher@rmg.co.ukDeadline for bursary applications: Extended to 31 July

Standard: £90 Concessions: £45

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Local Heroes

Catching the light: photography without a camera

Join photographer Ingrid Budge in an exploration of camera-less photography techniques to make images of botanical specimens as part of Stromness Museum’s year-long celebration of the life and work of local…

Sunday 10 September 2017

09/10/2017

09/10/2017

Throughout 2017 Stromness Museum is celebrating the life and work of Charles Clouston, one of the founding members of the Orkney Natural History Society, through a series of exciting events. This unique workshop will involve a variety of camera-less photographic techniques to make images of a variety of botanical specimensAttending this event Suitable for adults and children aged 4+ Children must be accompanied by an adult Donation towards material costs Entry to the museum is free Please contact Stromness Museum for further informationLocal HeroesThis event is held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

Free Event

astronomyandphysics localheroes pastevents

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Local Heroes

Seaweed through the lens: photography and botany

Join photographer and seaweed enthusiast Rebecca Marr in a unique workshop combining seaweed foraging and photography as part of Stromness Museum’s year-long celebration of the life and work of local scientific hero…

Saturday 09 September 2017

09/09/2017

09/09/2017

Throughout 2017 Stromness Museum is celebrating the life and work of Charles Clouston, one of the founding members of the Orkney Natural History Society, through a series of exciting events. This unique workshop will involve a variety of camera-less photographic techniques to make images of a variety of botanical specimensAttending this event This is a two part event: Part 1 – Saturday 9 September, 15.30 – 17.30, meeting on the Birsay shore. Meet at beach carpark at 15.30; Part 2 – Sunday 10 September, 10.00 – 12.00 in Stromness at the Navigation School for photography Suitable for adults and children aged 4+ Children must be accompanied by an adult Donation towards material costs Entry to the museum is free Please contact Stromness Museum for further informationLocal HeroesThis event is held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

Free Event

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Cafe Scientifique

Does a healthy diet equal a healthy heart?

What we eat is key for improving global public health. Current estimates suggest that 30% of chronic disease is preventable through dietary change. Despite this, it’s unclear exactly what constitutes a healthy diet…

Tuesday 05 September 2017

09/05/2017

09/05/2017

Professor Aedin Cassidy is researching the impact of flavonoids, compounds naturally present in fruits and vegetables, on reducing the risk of developing heart disease. Join Professor Cassidy to discuss her research and the latest developments in nutrition as a tool for improving public health.What is a Café Scientifique? A Café Scientifique is an informal dialogue-based event with a scientist. A short talk by the speaker is followed by audience questions, an interactive activity and discussion for the rest of the event.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

London

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Science Museum Lates: Space

The Royal Society prepared for launch, teaming up with the Science Museum, BBC, Wellcome and Open University to bring you the best in UK space research.

Wednesday 30 August 2017

08/30/2017

08/30/2017

The Royal Society will be hosted a series of talks and activities across the Science Museum to showcase the best exhibits from our Summer Science Exhibition alongside the Royal Society’s leading planetary scientists, cosmologists and astrophysicists.Find out moreGalaxy makersFind out how to build a galaxy using a few simple ingredients, a glug of black holes, a sprinkling of stars and a dash of dark matter, all mixed together by gravity.  Neutrino catchersCosmic neutrinos fly through space and pass through Earth any given square kilometre of earth just once per century. Find out about Antarctic expeditions to find these rare particlesListening to Einstein’s UniverseOne hundred years ago, Einstein predicted the existence of gravity waves. Meet members of the LIGO collaborative research group and the incredible devices they used to prove him right.Amazing masers Meet lasers older sibling the maser – beams of concentrated microwaves that can transmit data across astronomical distances without signal loss. Discover how masers could be used to help communications with Mars.Visualising matter Envision the corners of the universe that have never been seen before using the EAGLE galaxy simulator – now featuring in the latest Terrence Malick IMAX film ‘Voyage of Time’.How to build a galaxy with Professor FrenkProfessor Carlos Frenk CBE FRS builds galaxies for a living. Using supercomputers he delves into the depths of the cosmos to track how tiny wrinkles in the early universe evolved into the complexity of the universe we see around us.About Science Museum LatesThe Science Museum’s Lates is a free night for adults that takes place on the last Wednesday of the month. Lates have a different theme each month, spanning issues as diverse as alcohol, climate change, sex and war – this month the Royal Society is collaborating with the BBC, Science Museum, Wellcome and the Open University as part of the Tomorrow’s World project.For more information please visit the Science Museum website. For all enquiries please contact the public engagement team.

London

Free Event

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Festival Event

Young People’s Book Prize Activity Day

Get creative with hands on family activities inspired by the shortlist of our 2017 Young People’s Book Prize.

19 – 20 August 2017

08/19/2017

08/20/2017

Join us at the Edinburgh International Book Festival and take part in exciting drop-in activities inspired by the Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize shortlist. Surprising science experiments, arts and crafts and our fantastic 2017 shortlist await. Alongside the activities and our reading corner you will also have the unique opportunity to cast your vote for the winner of the prize, announced in November 2017.Attending this event Drop in anytime, 11am – 4.30pm Free, no registration required Family friendly, all ages welcome Event takes place in the Baillie Gifford Story Box room at the Edinburgh International Book Festival

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PAST EVENT

Local Heroes

John Couch Adams Printmaking Workshop

Lawrence House Museum in Cornwall share the story of John Couch Adams, a local hero who co-discovered the existence of Neptune through calculations made whilst studying the moons around Uranus. 

Saturday 12 August 2017

08/12/2017

08/12/2017

This special printmaking workshop will uncover the astronomy of Couch Adams using traditional artistic techniques. Visit the Museum’s displays to find inspiration and learn printmaking skills with local printmaker Sophie Fordham. Attending this event Suitable for adults and children aged 4+ Children must be accompanied by an adult Donation towards material costs Entry to the museum is free Please contact Lawrence House Museum for further informationLocal HeroesThis event is held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

Free Event

astronomyandphysics localheroes pastevents

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Local Heroes

A walk on the beach

In 1878 the shell collection of local Tenby resident William Lyons was donated to an early Tenby Museum, the oldest independent museum in Wales. Of important historical and scientific interest, this donation formed…

Thursday 27 July 2017

07/27/2017

07/27/2017

This specially developed discovery walk will take to the beach of Tenby to bring the work of Lyons to life. Try your hand at shell hunting and see what you can identify from the shores that Lyons explored over 100 years ago. Attending this event Adult tickets cost £4.00 Children are free but must be accompanied by an adult To book a place and for further information please call Tenby Museum and Art GalleryLocal HeroesThis event is held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

£4.00 for adults, children free

localheroes pastevents

PAST EVENT

Local Heroes

Dean R. Lomax – Making dreams reality

Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery celebrate a modern day local science hero – Doncaster-born Dean Lomax, palaeontologist and honorary scientist at the University of Manchester. The museum follows the story from…

Thursday 27 July 2017

07/27/2017

07/27/2017

This family day event uncovers the scientific work of Dean with interactive activities and opportunities to get hands on with the museum collection. Learn about the work of a palaeontologist and uncover your fossil hunting skills. The exhibition will run from Wednesday 21 June to Saturday 16 September 2017. Attending this event Free to attend Tickets required for some activities and will be released on Thursday 6th July Please contact Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery for further ticketing informationLocal HeroesThis event is held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

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PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

When will robots outsmart us?

In partnership with the Science Museum, this panel discussion will explore the future possibilities for intelligent robots and discover what they will do, how we will use them, and how they might use us.

Friday 21 July 2017

07/21/2017

07/21/2017

Will we see thinking, feeling robots in our lifetimes, or is the idea of sentient machines a pipe dream? Join our panel to explore the social, philosophical and economic implications of advanced intelligence in robots, the dangers and opportunities this intelligence may present, and find out how close we are to being replaced as the most intelligent beings on Earth.Our host for the event will be science broadcaster and author Dr Adam Rutherford, along with a panel of experts. Bristol UWE’s Professor of Robot Ethics Alan Winfield Science broadcaster, writer and comedian Timandra Harkness Imperial College Professor of Affective and Behavioural Computing Maja Pantic Bertrand Russell Professor of Philosophy at Trinity College, Cambridge Huw PriceAttending the event Registration required Live text will be provided for this event British Sign Language interpretation are available upon request. Please let the Events Team know at least four weeks prior to the event if you plan to attend. Please visit the Science Museum website for travel and accessibility information All enquiries should be directed to events@royalsociety.org. 

London

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Local Heroes

Living History

Bruce Castle Museum celebrate the work of pioneering Tottenham chemist John Eliot Howard FRS (1807-1883), whose scientific discoveries were pivotal in the fight against malaria.

Sunday 16 July 2017

07/16/2017

07/16/2017

Join the museum for this special family activity and craft day. Discover a Tudor ‘still room’, meet a Tudor ‘still woman’ and get hands on with herbs used by the Tudors for mixing and cures. This event is the official launch of Bruce Castle Museum’s exhibition in celebration of John Eliot Howard FRS. The exhibition will run from 16 July 2017 to 1 April 2018.Attending this event All activities are free No registration required Suitable for children 5-13 years old All children under 10  must be accompanied by an adult and be supervised. No adult admitted without an accompanying child.Local HeroesThis event is held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

microbiologyimmunologyanddevelopmentalbiology anatomyphysiologyandneurosciences localheroes pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Blunders and breakthroughs

Sunday 09 July 2017

07/09/2017

07/09/2017

Scientists throughout history have made their name from predictions that have been proven correct. But what about those theories that later turn out not to be true?Join our expert panel as we delve into the idea of failed predictions. Can making mistakes help scientists to become celebrated thinkers of their time?For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Aperiodic patterns and forbidden symmetry

Sunday 09 July 2017

07/09/2017

07/09/2017

Join crystallographer Professor Brian Sutton and artist Dr Shelley James to explore the beauty of classical symmetry in geometrical patterns and discover the secrets of forbidden symmetry in Penrose tiling. Create your own colourful pattern to take home.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements.  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017 For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Robot senses

Sunday 09 July 2017

07/09/2017

07/09/2017

Discover the human side of machines as we look at the links between our own biology, robots and artificial intelligence. We’ll have live demonstrations showing how robots can communicate with each other, sense their environment and help humans avoid dangerous situations.Running timesThis event will run from 12noon-1pm, 2pm-3pm and 4pm-5pm.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 11+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Energising the future

Sunday 09 July 2017

07/09/2017

07/09/2017

Power a lightbulb by riding a bike, race your friends to complete a solar cell circuit or make a battery using salt and water. Find out more and talk to researchers from the Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies about how you can help create a cleaner future.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Everyday physics – explore and explain

Sunday 09 July 2017

07/09/2017

07/09/2017

Get creative with the art-physics collective Jiggling Atoms and explore simple harmonic motion, kinetic energy, gravity and the secrets of the rainbow. Then transform your knowledge into a sculpture made of familiar everyday items that you can then use to explain your understanding to others.Running timesThis event will run at 11am-12pm, 12pm-1pm, 2pm-3pm, 3pm-4pm and 4pm-5pm.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Goodness gracious gravity

Sunday 09 July 2017

07/09/2017

07/09/2017

March your way up to the Duke of York steps where you’ll learn how when things are up they are up and when things are down they are down. Investigate why the Duke of York stays sat on his column and how maths helps hold the ceiling up, or find out what a sumo wrestler and a structural engineer have in common.Running timesThis event will run at 11am, 12pm, 2pm, 3pm and 4pm. Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Meeting point in the courtyard outside main entrance Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Superhero science: first class

Sunday 09 July 2017

07/09/2017

07/09/2017

Join an agent of A.W.E.S.O.M.E. to discover the science behind superpowers!Would you choose super-healing or super-strength? Mind-reading or laserbeams? Pick your destiny as the Agent of A.W.E.S.O.M.E takes you on a supernatural journey exploring how superpowers could work.Supported by the Wellcome Trust, BBSRC and University of Glasgow.Running timesThis event will run from 11am-12noon, 1pm-2pm and 3pm-4pm.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Biology buskers

Sunday 09 July 2017

07/09/2017

07/09/2017

Meet the biology buskers from the brand new Francis Crick Institute in London and their biomedically-inspired games and tricks for you to try. Head to their stand to find out more about the Crick’s research and how you can visit the institute.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements.  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017 For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

What’s on Sunday 9 July

Sunday 09 July 2017

07/09/2017

07/09/2017

Along with the 22 exhibits of cutting-edge science, there’s plenty to see and do for kids and grown ups alike at the Summer Science Exhibition with an exciting programme of supporting activities and talks.Please see individual event pages for specific timings and further attendance information.Drop-in activities  Biology buskers Kids’ zone Energising the future Aperiodic patterns and forbidden symmetryTicketed events – get your ticket on arrival at the exhibition Goodness gracious gravity Superhero science: First class Everyday physics Robot sensesTalks Blunders and breakthroughsAttending the exhibition Free to attend Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  These events are part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Kids’ zone

Sunday 09 July 2017

07/09/2017

07/09/2017

Ever wondered how the stars got into the sky? Or how our magnificent brains work?Visit the Little House of Science team as they answer these questions and more in our Kids’ Zone, where inquisitive young minds can experiment, explore and play.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for children under 10 Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Some like it hot

Saturday 08 July 2017

07/08/2017

07/08/2017

Spicy food gives a real rush to some of us, but it can also really hurt. If it’s setting off our pain sensors, why do we like it? Pain sensation expert John Wood and experimental psychologist Charles Spence discuss why spicy food gives some of us such a buzz.Talk – admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

The scent of attraction

Saturday 08 July 2017

07/08/2017

07/08/2017

Does the way you smell make you attractive? The idea that pheromones can trigger attraction is widely reported, but is it true? Join TED speaker, author and #OutInSTEM scientist Tristram Wyatt to explore how pheromones affect animal behaviour and discuss the power of our scent.Admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy at the weekends and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Rebel science

Saturday 08 July 2017

07/08/2017

07/08/2017

Think scientists are boring boffins that don’t leave the lab? Think again. The scientists of yore spent hundreds of years breaking the rules, blowing things up and performing dangerous experiments.Now it’s your turn to get stuck in. Discover what they did and how they did it with Dan Green, author of Rebel Science, shortlisted for the 2016 Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize.Signed copies of Rebel Science will be available to purchase (cash only) following the event. Running timesThis event will run from 12noon-1pm, 2pm-3pm and 4pm-5pm. Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Goodness gracious gravity

Saturday 08 July 2017

07/08/2017

07/08/2017

March your way up to the Duke of York steps where you’ll learn how when things are up they are up and when things are down they are down. Investigate why the Duke of York stays sat on his column and how maths helps hold the ceiling up, or find out what a sumo wrestler and a structural engineer have in common.Running timesThis event will run at 11am, 11.30am, 12.30pm, 2pm, 3pm and 4pm. Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Meeting point in the courtyard outside main entrance Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Zombie science: worst case scenario

Saturday 08 July 2017

07/08/2017

07/08/2017

Could you survive a Zombie outbreak? Discover how to recognise the signs of a zombie pandemic and what to do if one occurs. Will your choices save us from the worst case scenario?Supported by the Wellcome Trust and University of Glasgow.Running timesThis event will run from 11am-12noon, 1pm-2pm and 3pm-4pm.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 11+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Local Heroes

Hugh Bourne: Pioneer of Science for All

Best known as the co-founder of Primitive Methodism, Hugh Bourne was also a self-educated local science pioneer, working in the community to promote scientific understanding and experiment.

Saturday 08 July 2017

07/08/2017

07/08/2017

Englesea Brook Chapel and Museum uncovered Hugh Bourne’s scientific legacy with this special event featuring talks and hands-on experiments. Visitors could explore the remedies behind his Physic Garden, see a Newcomen Steam Engine model and visit an accompanying exhibition.Local HeroesThis event was held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Bug off!

Saturday 08 July 2017

07/08/2017

07/08/2017

Ever wondered how attractive you are to mosquitoes? What makes some people more tasty than others?Now is your chance to find out with the Bug Off! travel health clinic. Find out about the global menace that is the mosquito, bust those repellent myths and find out how you can stay safe when travelling.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 11+ Travel and accessibility information – please contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017 For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Can we build indestructible sandcastles?

Saturday 08 July 2017

07/08/2017

07/08/2017

Discover how it’s possible to use sand and earth to make super stable structures that are as solid as the ground they’re built from! We explore the science and engineering of sandcastles and look at how this is paving the way for sustainable building materials.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 11+ Travel and accessibility information – please contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017 For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Energising the future

Saturday 08 July 2017

07/08/2017

07/08/2017

Power a lightbulb by riding a bike, race your friends to complete a solar cell circuit or make a battery using salt and water. Find out more and talk to researchers from the Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies about how you can help create a cleaner future.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Kids’ zone

Saturday 08 July 2017

07/08/2017

07/08/2017

Ever wondered how the stars got into the sky? Or how our magnificent brains work?Visit the Little House of Science team as they answer these questions and more in our Kids’ Zone, where inquisitive young minds can experiment, explore and play.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for children under 10 Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

What’s on Saturday 8 July

Saturday 08 July 2017

07/08/2017

07/08/2017

Along with the 22 exhibits of cutting-edge science, there’s plenty to see and do for kids and grown ups alike at the Summer Science Exhibition with an exciting programme of supporting activities and talks.Please see individual event pages for specific timings and further attendance information.Drop-in activities  Kids’ zone  Energising the future Can we build indestructible sandcastles?  Bug off!Ticketed events – get your ticket on arrival at the exhibition Goodness gracious gravity  Zombie science Rebel scienceTalks The scent of attraction Some like it hotAttending the exhibition Free to attend Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  These events are part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

LEGO® physics

Friday 07 July 2017

07/07/2017

07/07/2017

You’re invited on a journey of creation, from the Big Bang to the first stars to shine. What better way to get creative than using LEGO®? Dr Ben Still shows how a handful of different building bricks and a few construction rules cooked up the chemical elements essential to life on Earth.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Prepare for launch

Friday 07 July 2017

07/07/2017

07/07/2017

Fasten your seat belts and prepare for launch. If you’ve ever wondered what it might be like to be a space scientist, how to design space missions or to explore the wonders of the Universe then this is the show for you.Get ready for an expedition into the unknown.Running timesThis event will run at 2pm, 3.30pm, 5pm.Ticketed – these sessions are timed and have limited capacity. Please go to the information desk in the Marble Hall to get your ticket on the day of your event. Without a ticket you will be denied entry.Attending the event Free to attend Registration on the day, get your ticket at the information desk Tickets allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  Doors open 15 minutes before start of event Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Inspiring reads for curious minds

Tuesday 04 July 2017

07/04/2017

07/04/2017

What makes a good book? Join our panel of expert science writers Gaia Vince, Mark Miodownik, Lucie Green and chaired by Professor Richard Fortey FRS as we discuss their most inspirational science books and discover how a great read can have the power to inspire, move or even change a life.Find out more about the The Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize which is celebrating its 30th anniversary at events taking place throughout 2017.Admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy in the evening and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

The sounds of science

Tuesday 04 July 2017

07/04/2017

07/04/2017

We open up our garden for an evening of music, dance, rapping and comedy.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Blood lines

Tuesday 04 July 2017

07/04/2017

07/04/2017

Grab your knitting needles and help build a woollen sculpture inspired by the body’s network of blood vessels.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Arts @ Summer Science

Get creative at a special late night opening of the Summer Science Exhibition. 

Tuesday 04 July 2017

07/04/2017

07/04/2017

Head to our music tent where you can rock out with the Killer Bee Queen band, be serenaded by science songstress Helen Arney, or learn biology with rapper Thermoflynamics.Join our panel of experts including Mark Miodownik, Lucy Green, Gaia Vince and Richard Fortey as we discuss what makes a good science book.Or spend a little creative down time creating science poetry, drawing objects from our archives or knitting blood vessels. Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity See individual events listings for age recommendations Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Hidden treasures

Tuesday 04 July 2017

07/04/2017

07/04/2017

Get your artistic juices flowing and explore some of the amazing artefacts from our archives in this still life drawing workshop.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Reading zone

Tuesday 04 July 2017

07/04/2017

07/04/2017

Unearth lost heroes of science, journey into space or immerse yourself in the information age with this selection of outstanding science books from the Royal Society’s book prizes for both adults and children.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for ages 7+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Sci-ku workshop

Tuesday 04 July 2017

07/04/2017

07/04/2017

Haikus have existed for centuries in Japan where they are used to express complex emotions and ideas in a short simple poem. With the help of science poet Dr Sam Illingworth, you can do the same with your favourite bit of science.Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Suitable for age 14+ Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Summer Science Exhibition 2017

04 – 09 July 2017

07/04/2017

07/09/2017

The Summer Science Exhibition is an annual showcase of exciting, cutting-edge science from across the UK. The week-long festival features 22 exhibits at the forefront of innovation. You can meet the scientists, try some of the hands-on activities or attend some fantastic talks and events. Attending this event  Free and open to all No registration requiredPlease check back closer to the event for more detailed information. For general enquiries, please contact exhibition@royalsociety.org. 

London

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

3D-Print your way to health

Monday 03 July 2017

07/03/2017

07/03/2017

Join transplant surgeon Pankaj Chandak and Professor Julian Jones as we explore the applications in clinical settings. Discuss how this versatile technology can open doors in regenerative medicine or be used by healthcare professionals to perform incredibly complex surgeries.This event is part of our Twilight Science evening. Admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy towards the evening and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Twilight Science is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

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PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Fake news, filter bubbles and echo chambers

Monday 03 July 2017

07/03/2017

07/03/2017

Are social network algorithms just serving us the news we want to see and giving us a rose-tinted view of the world where everyone agrees with us? And are we becoming more tribal as a result? Our expert panel of Professor Dame Uta Frith FRS, Professor Sofia Olherde and Dr Dan Mercea will discuss all this and more, hosted by the Science Gallery London’s director Dr Daniel Glaser.This event is part of our Twilight Science evening. Admittance for our talks is first-come, first-served. Please ensure you arrive early for talks as we can get busy towards the evening and you may need to queue to get into the building.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements Twilight Science is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Silent disco: Human versus machine

Monday 03 July 2017

07/03/2017

07/03/2017

Come bust some moves and take part in a silent disco with a twist. Our take on a Turing Test, one playlist is produced by humans and one playlist contains music made by machines. Can you tell the difference?AI music kindly provided by Jukedeck.This event is part of our Twilight Science evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Twilight Science is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

The kitchen laboratory

Monday 03 July 2017

07/03/2017

07/03/2017

Delve into the secrets of molecular gastronomy with our mouth-watering tasting stations. Try liquid nitrogen ice cream, take freezing to new sensory heights or dabble with liquids that appear solid in our ‘alchemy’ kitchen.This event is part of our Twilight Science evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Twilight Science is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Summer Science Exhibition

Twilight science

Celebrate the materialistic side of life for a night of real substance, as we explore all things synthetic to simulated, fabricated to fake.

Monday 03 July 2017

07/03/2017

07/03/2017

Attending the event Adults only Free to attend No registration required Drinks and snacks will be available for purchase at our pop-up café Visitors will be required to show a valid form of ID before purchasing alcoholic beverages Doors open from 6pm This event is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

London

london summerscienceexhibition pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

DIY DNA

Monday 03 July 2017

07/03/2017

07/03/2017

Extract your own DNA using household ingredients with the team from Bento Lab, and explore the growing movement of DIY biology which is making genetic technologies more accessible. Unite with citizen scientists across the globe conducting homegrown research, from checking their lasagne for horsemeat to tracking the origin of their beer hops.This event is part of our Twilight Science evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Twilight Science is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Material world

Monday 03 July 2017

07/03/2017

07/03/2017

Join us in the garden to get a glimpse of the fabrics, plastics and substances that the future will be made of. Meet the scientists developing bio-receptive concrete to give us greener cities, electricity-generating clothes that recharge your phone in your pocket or fixing our ageing body with 3D-printed bones and joints.This event is part of our Twilight Science evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Twilight Science is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

What’s your poison?

Monday 03 July 2017

07/03/2017

07/03/2017

Test out some toxicology while getting lightly intoxicated. Our mixologists will fix you one of three deliciously poisonous cocktails while Dr Kathryn Harkup talks you through the poisonous ingredients that go into each one. Find out which liqueur contains cyanide, how many espressos it would take to kill you and which fruit can digest you while you digest it.This event is part of our Twilight Science evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Twilight Science is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Twilight Science

Insects: food of the future?

Monday 03 July 2017

07/03/2017

07/03/2017

Tempt your taste buds with some edible insect treats at our tantalising tasting station. Discover how eating bugs can benefit the environment and why insects make such good alternative food sources.This event is part of our Twilight Science evening. Drop-in activity – these activities run continuously and you can drop in at any time. Please note if the venue is at capacity you may have to wait.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required  Limited spaces, admittance based on venue capacity Adults only Travel and accessibility information – contact us directly to arrange any specific accessibility requirements  Twilight Science is part of the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition 2017For all enquiries, please email exhibition@royalsociety.org.

twilightscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Local Heroes

Dean R. Lomax – Making dreams reality

Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery celebrate a modern day local science hero – Doncaster-born Dean Lomax, palaeontologist and honorary scientist at the University of Manchester. The museum follows the story from…

Saturday 01 July 2017

07/01/2017

07/01/2017

To celebrate the opening of their exhibition guests were invited to this special launch event featuring a free hands-on activities and talks.The exhibition will run from Wednesday 21 June to Saturday 16 September 2017.Local HeroesThis event was held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

localheroes pastevents

PAST EVENT

Local Heroes

Howards & Sons Ltd: From quinine to aspirins

Bruce Castle Museum celebrated the work of pioneering Tottenham chemist John Eliot Howard FRS (1807-1883), whose scientific discoveries were pivotal in the fight against malaria.

Wednesday 28 June 2017

06/28/2017

06/28/2017

The Howards of Tottenham were pioneering chemists and Fellows of the Royal Society. The head of this important scientific family was Luke Howard FRS (1772-1864), the eminent meteorologist, who established his pharmaceutical business, working with his sons Robert Howard (1801-1871) and John Eliot Howard FRS (1807-1883).In this talk, local historian Richard Morris explored the history of the Howard pharmaceutical business from its beginnings in Fleet Street in 1797, the first manufacturing unit at Plaistow, the factory at Stratford, and the move to Ilford in the early years of the twentieth century. He also delved into the biographies of the different Howard family members, whose activities included local government, religion, opera and charity, as well as chemistry.This talk accompanied Bruce Castle Museum’s exhibition in celebration of John Eliot Howard FRS. The exhibition will run from 16 July 2017 to 1 April 2018.Local HeroesThis event was held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

anatomyphysiologyandneurosciences localheroes pastevents

PAST EVENT

Local Heroes

Brook Street Chapel Talk and Tour

Bruce Castle Museum celebrated the work of pioneering Tottenham chemist John Eliot Howard FRS (1807-1883), whose scientific discoveries were pivotal in the fight against malaria.

Monday 26 June 2017

06/26/2017

06/26/2017

John Eliot Howard FRS and his brother Robert Howard, the sons of Luke Howard FRS (1772-1864) – known as the ‘Father of Meteorology’ –  were amongst the founding members of Brook Street Chapel in Tottenham. This historical building opened in 1839 as a chapel for local Plymouth Brethren. This unique tour presented the fascinating history of the chapel and its community work – what it does today, as well as over the past two centuries.  The talk and tour was organised to accompany Bruce Castle Museum’s exhibition in celebration of John Eliot Howard FRS. The exhibition will run from 16 July 2017 to 1 April 2018.Local HeroesThis event was held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

localheroes pastevents

PAST EVENT

Local Heroes

Under the Microscope

Bruce Castle Museum celebrated the work of pioneering Tottenham chemist John Eliot Howard FRS (1807-1883), whose scientific discoveries were pivotal in the fight against malaria.

Sunday 18 June 2017

06/18/2017

06/18/2017

Guests were invited to get hands on with the work of Howard at this special family art and craft day.The event accompanied Bruce Castle Musuem’s exhibition in celebration of John Eliot Howard FRS. The exhibition will run from 16 July 2017 to 1 April 2018.Local HeroesThis event was held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

microbiologyimmunologyanddevelopmentalbiology anatomyphysiologyandneurosciences localheroes pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

The Hay Festival and the Royal Society present – Jennifer Doudna talks to Adam Rutherford

A handful of discoveries have changed the course of human history. Jennifer Doudna’s book, A Crack in Creation: The New Power to Control Evolution, is about the most recent and potentially the most powerful and…

Friday 16 June 2017

06/16/2017

06/16/2017

It is an invention that allows us to rewrite the genetic code that shapes and controls all living beings with astonishing accuracy and ease. Thanks to it, the dreams of genetic manipulation have become a stark reality: the power to cure disease and alleviate suffering, to create new sources of food and energy, as well as to re-design any species, including humans, for our own ends.Doudna is the co-inventor of this technology, known as CRISPR, and a scientist of worldwide renown. Writing with fellow researcher Samuel Sternberg, she provides the definitive account of her discovery, explaining how this wondrous invention works and what it is capable of. A Crack In Creation also asks us to consider what our new-found power means: how do we enjoy its unprecedented benefits while avoiding its equally unprecedented dangers? As Doudna argues, every member of our species is implicated in the answers to these questions. Somehow we must consider and act together. The future of humankind – and of all life on Earth – is at stake. This book is an essential guide to the path that now lies ahead.The evening is chaired by Adam Rutherford, presenter of BBC Radio 4’s Inside Science and author of A Brief History of Everyone who Ever Lived: The Stories in Our Genes.Attending this event This is the official book launch.  First edition copies will be available to buy on the night. Tickets required £25.00 Tickets can be purchased from the Hay Festival website. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

£25.00

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Cafe Scientifique

Home is where the hydrogen is

Right now, scientists and engineers around the UK are looking for effective ways to tackle climate change and air pollution, by reducing our dependence on burning carbon-based fuels. The UK gas industry is over 200…

Tuesday 13 June 2017

06/13/2017

06/13/2017

One idea currently being tested is switching back from methane to hydrogen, but what are the safety considerations and costs to the taxpayer for this switch back to hydrogen in everyone’s homes? What about using hydrogen in our cars instead of diesel fuels to improve the air quality of our roads and towns? Are we right to be wary of hydrogen or does it get an unfairly bad press? We spoke to engineer Professor Nigel Brandon OBE FREng as well as fielding audience questions and concerns to find out whether you’d let hydrogen into your home.What is a Café Scientifique?A Café Scientifique is an informal dialogue-based event with a scientist. A short talk by the speaker is followed by audience questions, an interactive activity and discussion for the rest of the event.

London

london cafescientifique pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Why is life the way it is?

Thursday 08 June 2017

06/08/2017

06/08/2017

We know surprisingly little about how complex life began. How are we here at all and why has life evolved the way it has? Evolutionary biochemist Nick Lane reveals fascinating new ideas about the singular event that sparked complex life into existence, and asks whether evolution would follow a similar path on other planets.Dr Nick Lane is a biochemist in the Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment at University College London, and the author of four acclaimed books on evolution. Nick’s research deals with bioenergetics, focusing on the origin of life and the evolution of complex cells. He was a founding member of the UCL Consortium for Mitochondrial Research, and leads the UCL Research Frontiers Origins of Life programme. He was awarded the 2010 Royal Society Prize for Science Books, the 2015 Biochemical Society Award for his outstanding contribution to molecular life sciences, and the 2016 Royal Society Michael Faraday Prize for excellence in communicating science.Attending this event Tickets required £9.00 Tickets can be purchased from the Cheltenham Science Festival website.For all enquiries, please contact: events@royalsociety.org

£9.00

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Local Heroes

Bright Lights in the Borders

Berwick Museum and Art Gallery celebrated the achievements of scientists from the borders, exploring the work of early pioneers of astronomy, geology, optics and more.

Saturday 03 June 2017

06/03/2017

06/03/2017

This family day event uncovered the flourishing scientific community in the borders between Berwick and Edinburgh in the first half of the 19th century. The Museum highlighted the work of five eminent scientists of the region, including Mary Somerville – astronomer, mathematician and polymath.Guests were invited to meet dinosaur expert Tom Challands, discover microscopes and geology with Toni Hammill and make their very own kaleidoscope with Jenny Docket. The accompanying exhibition will run until 30 September 2017.Local HeroesThis event is held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects.For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

Entry via English Heritage pay barrier (Adult £4.90/Child £2.90)

localheroes pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

The next big thing

Rosalind Rickaby, Nicole Grobert and Alicia El Haj discuss the next big thing.

Friday 02 June 2017

06/02/2017

06/02/2017

From nanomaterials and ancient oceans to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, three Royal Society Research Fellows introduced and discussed their work at the forefront of science with climatologist and broadcaster Gabrielle Walker.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

£8.30

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Rebel science

Do you think scientists are boring boffins who don’t leave the lab? Think again!

Thursday 01 June 2017

06/01/2017

06/01/2017

The brainiacs of history spent hundreds of years breaking the rules, blowing things up and performing dangerous experiments. Come and celebrate 400 years of rebel antics. Expect plenty of silly wigs and terrible jokes. Dress up as a scientist and be in with a chance of winning a signed copy of Dan Green’s Rebel Science, shortlisted for the Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize 2016, which celebrates the best books that communicate science to young people.For all enquiries please contact events@royalsociety.org.

Free Event

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

We need to talk about gene tech

The what and why of gene technology.

Tuesday 30 May 2017

05/30/2017

05/30/2017

Why does public debate and policy treat the application of genetic technology differently when we are discussing medicine and food? Why is our concept of what is ‘natural’ so controversial and the idea of GM food so alarming? Scientists and sociologists came together to discuss what’s being ventured and how it is perceived.With Dale Sanders FRS, Susan Molyneux Hodgson and Stephen Tindale. This event was chaired by Daniel Davis. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

£7.30

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

The fourth revolution: how the infosphere is reshaping human reality

Luciano Floridi shares an insight into the latest thinking shaping our data-driven society. 

Tuesday 30 May 2017

05/30/2017

05/30/2017

As the boundaries between life online and offline break down, we become seamlessly connected to each other and surrounded by smart, responsive objects. We are all becoming integrated into an ‘infosphere’. Personas we adopt on social media, for example, feed into our real lives so that we begin to live in ‘onlife’. Following those led by Copernicus, Darwin and Freud, this metaphysical shift represents nothing less than a fourth revolution. Luciano Floridi is Professor of Philosophy and Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford. This event is chaired by Timandra Harkness.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

£8.30

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Local Heroes

The Revd William Fox, Britain’s greatest dinosaur hunter

The Dinosaur Isle Museum celebrated the life and work of Revd William Fox, a Victorian dinosaur hunter who discovered more species of dinosaurs than any other Englishman. This special launch weekend uncovered the…

26 – 27 May 2017

05/26/2017

05/27/2017

The Inaugural Fox LectureA free talk with Dr Martin Munt and Prof. Paul Barrett. The lecture explored the scientific legacy of Fox and how his discoveries relate to modern palaeontology. Friday 26 May, 6pm-8pm at Wilberforce Hall, Brighstone Free of charge but places in the hall are limited Please call Dinosaur Isle Museum to register your placeThe Fox Trail Walk This special guided walk brought Fox’s fossil hunting to life, taking guests on the trail of his many dinosaur discoveries. With practical advice on how to look for fossils, the walk was led by Dr Martin Hunt and Paul Bradley. Saturday 27 May, 2pm-4pm  Meet at the Free Bishops Public House, Brighstone Free of charge Please call Dinosaur Isle Museum to register your placeLocal HeroesThis event was held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects. For all enquiries, please contact localheroes@royalsociety.org

localheroes pastevents

PAST EVENT

Cafe Scientifique

What is the Universe made of?

Tuesday 23 May 2017

05/23/2017

05/23/2017

The vast majority of the universe is invisible and, so far, undetectable. Baryonic matter, the ‘ordinary’ matter that we can encounter and see, accounts for just 5% of the total. A curious combination of what scientists call dark matter and dark energy accounts for the remaining 95%. The elusive properties of these constituents mean they are difficult to detect and little understood. In 2020, however, telescopes will attempt to rectify that by creating a dark matter map, surveying three quarters of the accessible sky and looking back in time over three quarters of the age of the Universe. Dr Thomas Kitching discussed how this map will probe the nature of dark matter and dark energy in the hopes of answering the question, what is the Universe made of?What is a Cafe Scientifique?A Café Scientifique is an informal dialogue-based event with a scientist. A short talk by the speaker is followed by audience questions, an interactive activity and discussion for the rest of the event.Attending this event Free to attend No registration required Doors open at 6pm  Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Travel and accessibility information can be found here.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

astronomyandphysics astronomyandphysics cafescientifique pastevents

PAST EVENT

Local Heroes

Charles Clouston: a man of science with his head in the clouds

Sunday 21 May 2017

05/21/2017

05/21/2017

Stromness Museum explored the life and work of Charles Clouston, one of the founding members of the Orkney Natural History Society. From geology to botany, archaeology to meteorology, Clouston’s work inspired a varied afternoon programme of free talks by archaeologists, artists, marine biologists and writers. The afternoon also saw the launch of the Orkney Cloud Photography Competition which will run from May 2017 until May 2018. The competition is judged by Gavin Pretor-Pinney of the Cloud Appreciation Society.Local HeroesThis event was held as part of the Local Heroes grant scheme, designed to engage audiences with the influence of science and scientists on local communities across the UK. From Orkney to Plymouth, 15 museums and galleries will reveal stories of scientific brilliance from across the ages. Read the full list of awarded projects. For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

localheroes pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Now you hear it, now you don’t: the neuroscience of deafness

Croonian Prize Lecture 2017 by Professor Jonathan Ashmore FMedSci FRS

Monday 15 May 2017

05/15/2017

05/15/2017

What makes hearing possible? Just the size of a pea, the cochlea of the inner ear allows you to detect anything from a pin drop to a car horn. Groups of cells within the cochlea, and in particular the outer hair cells act as biological microphones to amplify soundwaves and allow your brain to understand a whole world of sound. For an ageing population it is critical that the outer hair cells last as long as possible for without them we become progressively deaf. How are the cells maintained and, importantly, what do we still need to know to preserve them for a lifetime? Professor Ashmore explores how these incredible biological hearing aids work and you can join the hunt for the molecules that power them.The awardThe Croonian Medal and Lecture is awarded annually for outstanding achievements in the biological sciences. The lecture series began in 1738 and is the premier lecture in biological sciences.Professor Jonathan Ashmore FMedSci FRS was awarded the Croonian Medal and Lecture 2017 for his significant contributions to the field of neuroscience, shaping our current understanding of inner ear physiology, in particular for his analysis of the role of cochlear hair cells in normal hearing.For all enquires, please contact the Events Team.

London

Free Event

anatomyphysiologyandneurosciences anatomyphysiologyandneurosciences anatomyphysiologyandneurosciences healthandhumansciences healthandhumansciences london prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

International

Can we understand an insect society, and why should we care?

Wednesday 03 May 2017

05/03/2017

05/03/2017

International lecture by Professor Raghavendra Gadagkar.Many insects such as ants, bees and wasps organise themselves into societies with sophisticated communication and division of labour, paralleling and sometimes surpassing our own societies. We therefore have a natural curiosity to understand how these tiny insects can achieve such feats of social organisation. What are the rules that govern their lives and how does a bee or a wasp know what to do when?This lecture will illustrate the efforts to understand the workings of the primitively eusocial wasp Ropalidia marginata in peninsular India. The lecture will not merely convey the product of research but also describe the process of science, methodology and logic that drives the experiments. It will reflect on what we can learn from insect societies and argue that understanding insect societies helps us to reflect on how and why we live our lives the way we do and thus to better understand ourselves.Professor Raghavendra Gadagkar is Year of Science Chair Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology in the Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore and past-President of the Indian National Science Academy. He has established an active school of research in the area of Animal Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution in India. The evolution of cooperation and conflict in social insects, such as ants, bees and wasps, is a major goal of his research. As the Founder Chair of the Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science, he is engaged in fostering meaningful interaction between the natural and human sciences.The International lecture will be webcast live and the video recording of the lecture will be available shortly after.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Doors open from 18:00, and seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Live subtitles will be available at this event. British Sign Language interpretation available on request. Please let the Events Team know if you plan to attend at least two weeks prior to the event Travel and accessibility informationFor all enquiries, please contact the Events Team.

organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology international pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Photovoltaic solar energy: from the photoelectric effect to global power generation and beyond

Wednesday 26 April 2017

04/26/2017

04/26/2017

Kavli Medal and Lecture by Professor Henry Snaith FRS.The sun has been powering our planet for eons and solar energy is the route power source for the majority of life on earth. Human civilisation relies almost entirely on solar energy, but as a primary source of fuel we have thus far capitalised upon burning ancient stores of solar energy in the form of carbonized remains of plant or microorganisms, i.e. coal and oil. However, the sudden release of these ancient stores of energy comes with the price of releasing the carbon and other pollutants back into the atmosphere, which is driving both global warming and dangerously unhealthy air quality. For the last 60 years scientist and engineers have been striving to make electronic devices which convert sun light directly into usable electricity. These photovoltaic cells are now so efficient that over the last 10 years, the cost of producing electricity from sun light is now cheaper in some places in the world than the production of electricity from coal fired power stations. We are now therefore at a tipping point, where increased future power generation capacity will be dominated by photovoltaics, due to economics rather than environmental concerns. This lecture will explore key discoveries and advancements of a new family of photovoltaic materials that have emerged over the last few years and promise to deliver the next generation of more efficient and cheaper photovoltaic cells.The video of the lecture can be seen above, and the Q&A video is available on youtube. The AwardThe Kavli Medal and Lecture is awarded biennially (in odd years) for excellence in all fields of science and engineering relevant to the environment or energy. The winner received a medal of bronze gilt, and a gift of £1,000. The winner is invited to deliver a public lecture on their research at the Society. Professor Henry Snaith FRS was awarded the Kavli Medal and Lecture 2017 for his discovery and development  of perovskite solar cells which promise to dramatically increase the efficiency and reduce cost of solar energy.For all enquires, please contact the Events Team. 

Free Event

astronomyandphysics prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

Changing expectations: reconsidering science careers

Tuesday 11 April 2017

04/11/2017

04/11/2017

The UK is at a political turning point both internationally and domestically. In order to maintain our international competitiveness, deliver world-leading and impactful research and ensure the security and sustainability of the research talent pipeline, it will be more important than ever to draw from a broad pool of talent and foster greater collaboration between academia and other sectors.UCL and the Royal Society are holding a joint ‘question time’ event on science careers which will explore how people can transition in and out of academia and different sectors. The event will consider the benefits and challenges of fluid career paths; the implications of the changing research landscape for science careers; and how greater mobility between academia and other sectors could be better supported.The event will be chaired by Professor Jane Clarke, Professor of Molecular Biophysics at the University of Cambridge and former science teacher, and followed by a drinks reception.Panellists include: Professor Katherine Smart, Global Chief Brewer at Anheuser-Busch InBev and former Professor of Brewing Science at the University of Nottingham Dr Nigel Picket, Chief Technology Officer of Nanoco Technologies and formerly research fellow at Georgia Institute of Technology Dr Mark Richards, Senior Teaching Fellow at Imperial College and founder of Duvas Technolgies, a spinout company for pollution mapping Dr Anna Zecharia, Head of Education, Training and Policy at the British Pharmacological Society and Director of ScienceGrrlThe event precedes the forthcoming launch of the Royal Society’s Changing Expectations career case studies which will showcase a number of different career paths and experiences.Attending this event Free to attend Registration required

London

london paneldiscussion pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

The curious history of curiosity-driven research

Professor Agar asked why scientists ask ‘why?’, and traced the curious history of curiosity-driven science.

Tuesday 04 April 2017

04/04/2017

04/04/2017

In the early modern period, curiosity was doubled-edged: it represented the “love of truth”, but also the source of human error and even personal corruption. In the 20th century, curiosity had become an apparently uncomplicated motivation. Successful scientists frequently attributed their first steps into science to a fundamental curiosity, an irrepressible desire to ask the question ‘why?’  An aside made by Albert Einstein in private correspondence in 1952 – “I have no special talents. I am only passionately curious” – has now become a meme. Yet in the 20th century, science was shaped by many forces, and the practical utility of science in the real, messy problematic worlds of its formation seem far removed from the seeming innocence of curiosity-driven research. Professor Jon Agar was awarded the 2016 Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Medal in recognition of his work as a leading figure in the history and philosophy of science. His ground breaking research covers issues including military technology, the origins of computing, astronomy, surveillance, and public engagement with science.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

London

london prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

Conference

Lab to Riches

The annual Labs to Riches dinner celebrates the Royal Society’s support for innovation in science and technology.

Thursday 30 March 2017

03/30/2017

03/30/2017

Labs to Riches brings together representatives from industry, academia, finance and government at an evening dinner to celebrate the achievements of the UK’s strength in research and innovation.In 2017 the evening will focus on the role of science in the UK’s industrial strategy, and how it can encourage innovation, improve productivity and contribute to economic growth.During the evening, we will showcase scientists who have experienced working in both industry and academia, and present the first Royal Society Innovation and Translation awards to researchers who are close to commercialising an aspect of their research. For more information, please email the Science and Industry programme at labstoriches@royalsociety.org

Free Event

conference pastevents

PAST EVENT

No series available.

Science Museum Lates: The next big thing

Join our experts at the Science Museum Lates in their bid to discover the next big thing.

Wednesday 29 March 2017

03/29/2017

03/29/2017

Explore the latest research over a drink with some of the UK’s leading scientists.Bounce a bucky ball or paint new molecules or proteins in virtual reality, discover your inner ape and become a master impersonator using voice modifying technology.You’ll also be able to dance the night away on our “Turing Dancefloor”, take on the role of a meteorite detective and find out how a gin and tonic could help save your life.About Science Museum LatesThe Science Museum’s Lates is a free night for adults that takes place on the last Wednesday of the month. Lates have a different theme each month, spanning issues as far apart as sex, alcohol and climate change – this month the Royal Society is taking over the programme and showcasing some of the best research from the UK’s leading scientists; join them in their journey to discover the next big thing. For more information please visit the Science Museum website.

London

Free Event

london pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Wiring up the brain: How axons navigate

Ferrier Prize Lecture 2017 given by Professor Christine Holt FMedSci FRS

Tuesday 28 March 2017

03/28/2017

03/28/2017

The brain is made up of billions of nerve cells (neurons) that are wired together by axons and dendrites. The precision of this wiring allows us to accurately sense, interpret and interact with the outside world, which is crucial for survival. Many neurons are positioned far away from the targets so they face the formidable task of sending out an axon that must navigate correctly over a long distance to find its targets. This key step in wiring the brain, called axon guidance, occurs early in embryonic development mostly before birth in humans. In this lecture, Professor Holt will describe work on how the eye makes its long-distance connections with the brain. She will discuss general mechanisms of guidance and the discovery that RNA-based mechanisms inside axons help to establish and maintain neural circuitry.  This prize lecture will be webcast live and the video recording of the event will be available shortly after the event.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Doors open from 18:00 and seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis British Sign Language interpretation and live subtitles will be available at this event. Please let the events team know if you would like to use these facilities. Travel and accessibility information is available here.The awardThe Ferrier Medal and Lecture is awarded triennially for distinguished contributions on the structure and function of the nervous system.Professor Christine Holt FMedSci FRS was awarded the Ferrier Medal and Lecture 2017 for pioneering understanding of key molecular mechanisms involved in nerve growth, guidance and targeting which has revolutionised our knowledge of growing axon tips.For all enquires, please contact the events team.

London

Free Event

anatomyphysiologyandneurosciences anatomyphysiologyandneurosciences anatomyphysiologyandneurosciences anatomyphysiologyandneurosciences microbiologyimmunologyanddevelopmentalbiology london prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

British Academy

Work less, play more: can humans benefit from robots in the workplace?

This event is part of the British Academy’s season on Robotics, AI and Society

Wednesday 22 March 2017

03/22/2017

03/22/2017

The Luddite uprising of the early 19th century pitted English textile workers against the machines taking their jobs. The machines won.If, as experts warn, large numbers of jobs are at risk of automation over the next 20 years, are we likely to encounter similar scenes of upheaval? Or are media reports of robots stealing our jobs misdirected?If machines can save us time and open up new types of roles, then surely we should embrace the change?Speakers Helen Dickinson, Chief Executive, British Retail Consortium Dr Sabine Hauert, Lecturer in Robotics, University of Bristol Daniel Susskind, Fellow in Economics, University of Oxford and co-author of The future of the professions: How technology will transform the work of human experts (OUP, 2015) Professor Judy Wajcman FBA, Anthony Giddens Professor of Sociology, LSE and author Pressed for time: The acceleration of life in digital capitalism (Chicago, 2015) Chair Timandra Harkness, Journalist and author, Big Data: Does size matter? (Bloomsbury Sigma, 2016)Organised in partnership with:Media partner:

London

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Cafe Scientifique

What next for gene therapy?

Tuesday 21 March 2017

03/21/2017

03/21/2017

Gene therapy allows the replacement or modification of genes in the cells of a patient. The technique has the potential to treat the underlying cause of a range of diseases and, as research progresses, the applications are likely to grow. But what should the limits be? And how do we decide where treatment ends and enhancement begins?Dr Stephanie Schorge and her team are investigating gene therapy as a cure for epilepsy. We joined Stephanie to explore current research and discuss where this novel technique is heading in the future.What is a Café Scientifique?A Café Scientifique is an informal dialogue-based event with a scientist. A short talk by the speaker is followed by audience questions, an interactive activity and discussion for the rest of the event.

London

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PAST EVENT

No series available.

Climate change: catastrophe, hoax or just lukewarm?

Special lecture by Professor Tim Palmer FRS

Monday 06 March 2017

03/06/2017

03/06/2017

Views about climate change can be very polarised. For some, it spells inevitable catastrophe. For others it is a massive hoax. However, in between these extremes a third “lukewarm” perspective has emerged. In this approach, the basic science of the greenhouse effect is accepted, but it is asserted that this implies only a modest warming of the planet, unimportant compared with other problems facing humanity.In this lecture, Professor Palmer emphasised the notion of risk and probability, in contrast with certainty and determinism, in scientific studies of climate change. With some emphasis on the lukewarmist perspective, he explained why none of the three perspectives above is consistent with the risk-based scientific consensus about climate change. In the talk Professor Palmer discussed why uncertainty about future climate need not itself be a reason for inaction.  

London

earthandenvironmentalsciences london pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Computing for the future of the planet

Bakerian Lecture 2017 by Professor Andy Hopper CBE FREng FRS

Thursday 02 March 2017

03/02/2017

03/02/2017

Digital technology is an indispensable and crucial component of our lives, society, and the physical environment. A challenge is how to use the power of computing to deal with the problems facing the world. In his talk, Professor Andy Hopper will present a framework for the role of computing in dealing with sustainability of the planet. The framework has a number of goals: an optimal digital infrastructure; sensing and optimising the use of resources in the physical world; guaranteeing the performance of indispensable systems; and digital alternatives to physical activities. In this lecture, Professor Hopper discusses practical industrial examples alongside research goals and societal challenges and dilemmas.The lecture will be webcast live and a recorded video will be available on this webpage following the event.The awardThe Bakerian Lecture series began in 1775 and is the premier lecture in the physical sciences. Professor Andy Hopper CBE FREng FRS won the Bakerian Medal and Lecture 2017 for his outstanding research in computer technology, with significant economic impacts, in particular his work in computer networking and sentient computing systems with an aim to providing sustainability.For all enquires, please contact the Events Team

London

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

Out in STEM 2017

Tuesday 28 February 2017

02/28/2017

02/28/2017

We are currently operating a waiting list for this event as it is fully booked. However there are often cancellations so please join the waiting list.This event will be streamed live – more details to follow. The Royal Society will celebrate LGBT History Month with a keynote address by Sir Dermot Turing.The theme for 2017 is Citizenship, PSHE and Law as we mark the 50th anniversary of the partial decriminalisation of male homosexuality in England and Wales.  Continuing the theme of the 2016 Royal Society Diversity Conference of creating inclusive environments, the programme will look at inclusivity in tech communities.Who should attendThis event is for anyone interested in learning about work that has taken place in the tech world to create inclusive environments for LGBT+ people.Sir Dermot is the nephew of Alan Turing, Bletchley Park’s leading cryptoanalyst and subject of the 2014 film The Imitation Game, as well as being one of Turing’s biographers.Royal Society archivist Keith Moore will also discuss items held in the archives on Alan Turing. A full programme and list of speakers will follow shortly.An informal dinner and networking will follow the discussions, please inform us of any dietary needs (diversity@royalsociety.org).Speech to text translation will be provided for the event, please let us know (diversity@royalsociety.org) if you have any specific access requirements.

London

Fully booked

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PAST EVENT

Cafe Scientifique

Turbulent times ahead for air travel?

Scientists are now discovering that climate change and air travel could be having huge impacts on each other.

Monday 27 February 2017

02/27/2017

02/27/2017

Air travel emissions contribute to climate change, but in return rising sea levels threaten coastal airports and extreme weather causes flight delays. Warmer air makes take-off more difficult, flights are more likely to run into clear-air turbulence and a changing jet stream could cost millions in fuel as transatlantic flights are slowed.We discussed how climate change might affect the future of air travel.Dr Paul Williams is a Royal Society University Research Fellow at the University of Reading.What is a Café Scientifique?A Café Scientifique is an informal dialogue-based event with a scientist. A short talk by the speaker is followed by audience questions, an interactive activity and discussion for the rest of the event.For all enquiries, please contact us.

London

earthandenvironmentalsciences earthandenvironmentalsciences earthandenvironmentalsciences london cafescientifique pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Rebel Science

Saturday 25 February 2017

02/25/2017

02/25/2017

Think scientists are boring boffins that don’t leave the lab? Think again! The brainiacs of history spent hundreds of years breaking the rules, blowing things up and performing dangerous experiments. Now it’s your turn to get stuck in. Discover what they did and how they did it with Dan Green, author of Rebel Science, shortlisted for the Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize. Take part in some rebellious science, and ask Dan your questions about the some of the most famous faces in the book – what did they invent? where did they go wrong, and who did they argue with?Featuring… Tycho Brahe, the astronomer with the metal nose and pet moose! Find out how the original rebel scientist Galileo Galilei dodged being burned alive! It’s the wurst – Rudolph Virchow fights a duel with sausages! Get down and dirty with the discovery of DNA’s structureCome and celebrate 400 years of rebel antics. Expect plenty of silly wigs and terrible jokes. Dress up as a scientist and be in with a chance of winning a signed copy of Rebel Science. This event is part of a series of Royal Society events taking place at the Northern Ireland Science Festival. Attending this event This event is fully booked Register to be notified if additional tickets are made available to the event on the Northern Ireland Science Festival website Ticket is required Free to attend Suitability: under 14s 

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Can machines ever be truly creative?

Explore whether artificial intelligence could ever demonstrate imagination and rival human intellect.  

Thursday 23 February 2017

02/23/2017

02/23/2017

Can you tell whether a piece of work was created by a computer or a human? Advances in machine learning have led to the generation of forms of art, written word, music and more, all by AI technology. But does this show true creativity? We joined Marcus du Sautoy and a panel of expert speakers to discuss whether AI just gives an illusion of novel thinking, or whether it is possible for software systems to exhibit creative behaviour. This event was part of a series of Royal Society events taking place at the 2017 Northern Ireland Science Festival.Speakers included: Professor Marcus du Sautoy, Charles Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science, Oxford University Dr Kevin Curran, Reader in Computer Science, Ulster University Dr Guruduth Banavar, VP & Chief Science Officer, Cognitive Computing, IBM Research Luba Elliott, Creative AI evangelistFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org. 

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

History Of Science

Frankenstein: inspiring the monster

Explore how this influential novel was inspired by science in the 19th century.

Tuesday 21 February 2017

02/21/2017

02/21/2017

The tale of a curious scientist who creates a sapient but grotesque Creature in a scientific experiment gone wrong has shaped science fiction writing for generations. Written by Mary Shelley in 1818, it defined a whole new genre of literature, but what was the inspiration behind her legendary story?We joined an expert panel to journey back to a time when using electricity was a novel concept, curiosity and research went hand in hand, and unorthodox scientific experimentation was the norm. Attendees discovered how the public perception of research and eminent scientists of the time influenced Shelley to unleash her Monster on the world.  Speakers included: Professor Richard Holmes, Biographer and Author  Professor Steve Jones FRS, Emeritus Professor of Genetics, University College London Dr Kathryn Harkup, Science Communicator Professor Roger Luckhurst, Professor in Modern and Contemporary Literature, Birkbeck University of LondonFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org. 

London

london historyofscience pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Intelligent Beer

Taste the world’s first beer brewed by artificial intelligence.

Thursday 16 February 2017

02/16/2017

02/16/2017

Can machine learning be used to brew better beer? IntelligentX Brewing Co. claims it can. Their unique brewing method is controlled by A.I. which changes the recipe to improve itself based on consumer feedback.  We explored the science behind the process, and gave attendees the chance to try a beer that has been created by an algorithm.This event was part of a series of Royal Society events taking place at the 2017 Northern Ireland Science Festival.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

Free Event

festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Why is life the way it is?

Despite the explosion of genetic information in recent years, we have surprisingly little insight into the peculiar history of life on our planet.

Wednesday 01 February 2017

02/01/2017

02/01/2017

Most genetic variation – natural experiments in evolution – is found in simple bacteria, yet they have barely changed over four billion years. No complex animals or plants are composed of bacterial cells. Why not? Why did complex cells only arise once in the history of life? And why are we complex beings so alike, with humans and mushrooms and trees all plotting for sex? Nick Lane will explore the importance of energy flow in shaping life from its very origins to the flamboyant complexity around us, and ask whether energy flow would direct evolution down a similar path on other planets.Dr Nick Lane is a biochemist in the Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment at University College London, and the author of four acclaimed books on evolution. Nick’s research deals with bioenergetics, focusing on the origin of life and the evolution of complex cells. He was a founding member of the UCL Consortium for Mitochondrial Research, and leads the UCL Research Frontiers Origins of Life programme. He was awarded the 2010 Royal Society Prize for Science Books, the 2015 Biochemical Society Award for his outstanding contribution to molecular life sciences, and the 2016 Royal Society Michael Faraday Prize for excellence in communicating science.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Doors open from 18:00 and seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis British Sign Language interpretation and live subtitles are available on request. Please let the events team know you plan to attend at least two weeks before the event. Travel and accessibility information is available here. Please note, this event will be filmed as part of a livestream broadcast This event is the 2016 Michael Faraday Prize lecture, previous winners have included Professor Katherine Willis, Professor Andrea Sella and Professor Brian Cox FRS.For all enquiries, please contact: events@royalsociety.org

London

london prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

British Academy

Do we need robot law?

This event is part of the British Academy’s season on Robotics, AI and Society

Tuesday 31 January 2017

01/31/2017

01/31/2017

Advances in AI have enabled a range of developments in robotics, from driverless vehicles to unmanned military machines.These advances raise questions about autonomy and accountability – what happens if a faithful servant disobeys an action, and who is to blame if things go wrong?Can our current governance mechanisms lessen these risks and empower us to adopt new technologies? Or do we need new laws and guidelines?Speakers Professor Susanne Beck, Professor for Criminal Law and Law Philosophy, University Hannover  Roger Bickerstaff, Partner, Bird & Bird Professor Patrick Haggard FBA, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London Professor Noel Sharkey, Emeritus Professor of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, University of SheffieldChair Dr Hannah Devlin, Science Correspondent, GuardianOrganised in partnership with:Media partner:

London

london britishacademy pastevents

PAST EVENT

History Of Science

Why we write

Friday 27 January 2017

01/27/2017

01/27/2017

In any kind of writing, whether by scientists or novelists, there are decisions to be made about how to represent the world. Should the author show readers the world, describing its features so they might draw their own conclusions? Or should the author guide readers to the points of interest, telling them what they should see?While it might seem that science is firmly in the telling camp and literature in the showing camp, scientific diaries and autobiographies seem to be spaces in which scientists have decided to show rather than tell. To explore how scientists write and why they write, we’ve invited a novelist and scientist, Professor Sunetra Gupta (University of Oxford), to share her experiences of writing in different ways and for different reasons. We then turn to a panel of historians of science, to ask them why some notable scientists of the last three centuries (Boyle, Hooke, Petiver, Banks, Solander, Blagden and Tyndall) kept a diary and how they went about it.In association with the Constructing Scientific Communities project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.Attending this event Free to attend No registration required Doors open at 17:45 Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Travel and accessibility informationFor all enquiries, please contact the Library team via library@royalsociety.org. 

Free Event

historyofscience pastevents

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Cafe Scientifique

Can our immune systems fight cancer?

We discussed the cutting edge cancer research being funded by Cancer Research UK and the Royal Society.

Tuesday 24 January 2017

01/24/2017

01/24/2017

Cancer is made up of mutated versions of our own cells, making it hard for the immune system to recognise and attack. But what if we could re-educate our immune system to recognise and fight cancer?Recent breakthroughs have shown we can do just that, but there are still challenges to overcome.Immunologist Professor Benjamin Wilcox, and Dr Karin Straathof from the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, discussed their latest research findings and what the future holds for this exciting field of science.What is a Café Scientifique?A Café Scientifique is an informal dialogue-based event with a scientist. A short talk by the speaker is followed by audience questions, an interactive activity and discussion for the rest of the event.For all enquiries, please contact us.

London

Free Event

london cafescientifique pastevents

PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

Brian Cox presents Science Matters – Machine Learning and Artificial intelligence

Pitch your questions and get answers on the AI and machine learning issues that matter to you.

Tuesday 10 January 2017

01/10/2017

01/10/2017

We’re beginning to see more and more jobs being performed by machines, even creative tasks like writing music or painting can now be carried out by a computer.But how and when will machines be able to explain themselves? Should we be worrying about an artificial intelligence taking over our world or are there bigger and more imminent challenges that advances in machine learning are presenting here and now?Join Professor Brian Cox, the Royal Society Professor of Public Engagement, as he brings together experts on AI and machine learning to discuss key issues that will shape our future. Panelists will include: Professor Jon Crowcroft FRS, Marconi Professor of Networked Systems at the University of Cambridge Professor Joanna Bryson, Reader in AI Ethics, University of Bath and Affiliate, Center for Information Technology Policy, Princeton University Professor Sabine Hauert, Lecturer in Robotics at the University of Bristol Professor Murray Shanahan, Professor of Cognitive Robotics at Imperial College London Professor Peter Donnelly FRS FMedSci, Director, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, and Professor of Statistical Science, University of OxfordScience MattersThe Royal Society’s ‘Science Matters’ series will give the public access to scientists who are experts on the science and technology issues with the greatest global impact. You’ll be able to pitch the question that matters to you the most, to help direct the experts’ discussion.

Free Event

paneldiscussion pastevents

PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

Brian Cox presents Science matters – Feeding the future

Pitch your questions and get answers on the GM issues that matter to you. Ensuring everyone has enough to eat is one of this century’s global challenges. 

Thursday 08 December 2016

12/08/2016

12/08/2016

As the global population grows, consumption patterns change and the impacts of climate change and growing scarcity of water and land put pressure on our ability to grow enough food. What steps can we take with modifying crops and species to secure the future of our food?Join Professor Brian Cox, the Royal Society Professor of Public Engagement, as he brings together experts on GM food to discuss key issues for the future of our planet. Panelists will include: Sir David Baulcombe FRS FMedSci, Regius Professor of Botany at the University of Cambridge Professor Ottoline Leyser CBE FRS, plant developmental biologist at the University of Cambridge and director of the Sainsbury Laboratory Professor Philip Stevenson, Professor of Chemical Ecology at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich Dr Claire Marris, Centre for Food Policy, City, University of LondonScience MattersThe Royal Society’s ‘Science Matters’ series will give the public access to scientists who are experts on the science and technology issues with the greatest global impact. You’ll be able to pitch the question that matters to you the most, to help direct the experts’ discussion.

paneldiscussion pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Unstructured proteins: cellular complexity and human diseases

Francis Crick Prize Lecture 2016 given by Dr Madan Babu Mohan

Wednesday 07 December 2016

12/07/2016

12/07/2016

If DNA is the blueprint of life, proteins are the building blocks. Research over the last century has shown that the shapes adopted by proteins determine their functions. Mutations that affect their shapes cause human diseases. However in recent decades, scientists have discovered that a large number of proteins do not adopt defined shapes. Nevertheless, these unstructured proteins perform functions that are critical for the survival of organisms. The audience joined Dr Mohan in discovering how unstructured proteins perform their functions, contribute to cellular complexity and cause human diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration.This lecture has passed, please view the video link above to watch the lecture.The awardThe Francis Crick Lecture is given annually in any field in the biological sciences. Preference is given to genetics, molecular biology and neurobiology, the general areas in which Francis Crick worked, and to fundamental theoretical work, which was the hallmark of Crick’s science.Dr Madan Babu Mohan was awarded the 2016 Francis Crick lecture for his major and widespread contributions to computational biology.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

London

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

In search of software perfection

Thursday 24 November 2016

11/24/2016

11/24/2016

2016 Milner Award lecture by Dr Xavier Leroy.Xavier Leroy is a senior research scientist at Inria where he leads the Gallium research team. His research focuses on programming languages and tools, and on the formal verification of software using program proof and static analysis. He is the architect and one of the main developers of the OCaml functional programming language and of the CompCert formally-verified C compiler.In the general public, “software” has become synonymous with “crashes” and “security holes”.  Yet, there exists life-critical software systems that achieve extraordinary levels of reliability.  For example, fly-by-wire systems, involving considerable amounts of software, have been used in commercial airplanes for nearly 40 years without any incident caused by a software bug.  What does it take to achieve this kind of software perfection?  This lecture will describe some of the approaches involved, with special emphasis on the use of formal verification tools – that is, programs that check other programs for the absence of whole classes of bugs.  These tools provide highly valuable guarantees that complement, and sometimes subsume, the assurance obtained by more traditional techniques such as testing.  Beware however: a bug in the verification tool or in the compiler that produce the actual executable from verified sources could ruin these guarantees.  How can we rule out this risk?  Using the CompCert verified C compiler as an example, the lecture will discuss a radical, mathematically-grounded answer: the formal verification, using proof assistants, of the tools that participate in the construction and verification of critical software.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Doors open from 18:00, and seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis  British Sign Language interpretation and live subtitles are available upon requestThe awardThe Royal Society Milner Award, supported by Microsoft Research, is given annually for outstanding achievement in computer science by a European researcher.It replaces the Royal Society and Académie des sciences Microsoft Award and is named in honour of Professor Robin Milner FRS (1934-2010), a pioneer in computer science.The winner of the award receives a medal and a personal prize of £5,000. The winner is invited to deliver a public lecture on their research at the SocietyFor all enquiries, please contact the Events Team.

London

Free Event

engineering london prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

Cafe Scientifique

Remote control healing

What if an injection to the arm could heal a broken leg?

Monday 21 November 2016

11/21/2016

11/21/2016

Professor Alicia El Haj and her team are discovering how to heal by remote control. After injecting stem cells into the body, it is possible to steer, guide them to a specific location, and remotely activate them, all from outside the body. At the site of a broken bone, an arthritic joint or blind eye, the stem cells can proliferate into healthy tissue, the body repairing itself without scarring.What is a Café Scientifique?A Café Scientifique is an informal dialogue-based event with a scientist. A short talk by the speaker is followed by audience questions, an interactive activity and discussion for the rest of the event.For all enquiries, please contact us.

London

Free Event

london cafescientifique pastevents

PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

Our window on the Universe

Rosalind Franklin Lecture 2016 by Professor Jo Dunkley.

Thursday 17 November 2016

11/17/2016

11/17/2016

The night sky is fascinating to humans, giving us a window on space beyond our home on Earth. In this lecture, Professor Dunkley described how we have come to better understand our Universe, and some of the big questions about space and time that we are trying to answer. She talked about her research in this area, studying distant light coming from the earliest moments in time, in a quest to understand the Big Bang, the ingredients of the Universe, and the fundamental laws of nature. Professor Dunkley also talked about the goal of engaging more young women to pursue physics, and about some of the scientists who have inspired and guided her.The awardThe Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture is awarded annually and is made to support the promotion of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.Professor Jo Dunkley was awarded the Rosalind Franklin Award and Lecture 2016 for her research in the Cosmic Microwave Background and her innovative project to support and encourage girls studying physics.For all enquiries, please contact the events team.

Free Event

astronomyandphysics astronomyandphysics astronomyandphysics prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

History Of Science

Revolutionary science in the age of the guillotine

Discover how the revolutionary movement in Paris and London helped shape the scientific landscape during the 18th century.

Tuesday 08 November 2016

11/08/2016

11/08/2016

Throughout the French Revolution, the most eminent scientists in France were battling a political crisis, social unrest and fear of execution. Despite this turmoil, Paris (the City of Light) was widely considered one of the richest scientific landscapes in the world. Across the English Channel, London was facing its own upheaval. As the idea of anarchy was spreading, notable figures such as Joseph Banks and Charles Blagden were busy building their own scientific legacies. We joined Ian Blatchford, Director of the Science Museum and Professor Steve Jones, author of No Need for Geniuses as they discussed how pioneering inventions, guillotines and revolutionary thinking in these two cities changed the future of science.  In partnership with the Science Museum.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

Growing tomorrow’s dinner – should GM be on the table?

Ensuring everyone has enough to eat is one of this century’s global challenges. The global population is growing, consumption patterns are changing and the impacts of climate change and growing scarcity of water and…

Tuesday 01 November 2016

11/01/2016

11/01/2016

There are promising techniques and technologies that can address this. By selectively breeding, we can develop crops that can grow in difficult, changing conditions. GM technologies can also be used to achieve similar results faster and to address some problems that cannot be solved through conventional selective breeding. However almost a third of people feel that the risks of GM crops outweigh the benefits and most do not feel informed about them. Do we need to take another look at technologies such as GM to see if they can offer solutions to this global challenge?We explored whether GM should be one of the options on the table, and what principles should be in place so that the public can have confidence in how they are used.In partnership with the Learned Society of Wales.Event speakers: Professor Melanie Welham, Chief Executive (Interim), BBSRC Stephen Tindale, Climate and Energy Policy Consultant and former Director of Greenpeace UK  Huw Jones, Professor of Translational Genomics for Plant Breeding, Aberystwyth University and Vice-Chair, GMO panel, European Food safety Authority Liz O’Neill, Director, GM FreezeFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.If you’d like to find out more about GM plants, you can find out more in our evidence-based Q&A.

paneldiscussion pastevents

PAST EVENT

Conference

Annual Diversity Conference 2016: Diversity Matters – the road to inclusivity

This event has concluded but you can view some of the sessions below.This year’s annual diversity conference will explore how inclusive environments can be created and maintained within science, technology,…

Monday 31 October 2016

10/31/2016

10/31/2016

View some of the sessions on YouTube View a Storify of the day’s social mediaWith the Royal Society’s strategic commitment to increase diversity in STEM, the need for inclusivity is all too evident.  The Society believes that it has a particular responsibility to ensure that diversity and inclusion are embedded across all of its activities and is part of the culture of the organisation.  Our annual diversity conference brings you organisations and individuals who are specialists in inclusive environments to give us the tips and tricks that we need to create and sustain our own inclusive environments.  They will guide us into a workshop on how you can create your own inclusive environment in order to build and develop a world in which studying and working in science are open to all. Keynote speakerMr Andrew Parker, Director General of MI5Motivational addressBonnie Greer OBE, Chancellor of Kingston University is a distinguished writer and broadcaster, whose intellectual interests embrace the worlds of arts and science with equal fervour.Attending this eventThis conference has now concluded.Please contact the diversity team at diversity@royalsociety.org if you have any queries.Find out more about Diversity at the Royal Society on our website.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Prize Lecture

The attractions of magnetism: chips, cancer and crime

Clifford Paterson Lecture 2016 by Professor Russell Cowburn FRS.

Wednesday 26 October 2016

10/26/2016

10/26/2016

Magnetism is a very old subject and it is sometimes thought that there is little left to discover. All of that changes when nanotechnology and magnetism are brought together – without the technologies that have come out of that meeting we wouldn’t have social media, the Cloud or even the Internet. In this talk Professor Cowburn will explain the new physics which is currently emerging from the rapidly changing research field of nanostructured magnetic materials, and how that new physics finds use in computer memory, in novel biomedical technologies and in detecting counterfeit documents and smuggled goods.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Doors open from 18:00, and seats are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis British Sign Language interpretation and live subtitles are available on request. Please let the Events Team know at least two weeks prior to the event.The awardThe Clifford Paterson Medal and Lecture is awarded biennially on any aspect of engineering. It is aimed at scientists working in modern and popular fields such as new media technologies and consumer electronics.Professor Russell Cowburn FRS was awarded the Clifford Paterson Medal and Lecture for his remarkable academic, technical and commercial achievements in nano-magnetics.  For all enquiries, please contact the Events Team.

London

Free Event

astronomyandphysics london prizelecture pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Royal Society Science Exhibition

24 – 28 October 2016

10/24/2016

10/28/2016

Join us in Manchester as we take cutting-edge science on the road. From astronomy and our environment to glaciers and our gut, the exhibition is a collision of the UK’s most exciting new science and technology. Meet scientists from across the country and get stuck in to interactive activities for all ages.The exhibition is part of the Manchester Science Festival. Attending this event Free Suitable for all ages Accessibility informationOpening times Monday 24 October: 11am – 5pmTuesday 25 October: 11am – 5pmWednesday 26 October: 11am – 5pmThursday 27 October: 11am – 5pmFriday 28 October: 11am – 5pm

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PAST EVENT

No series available.

The Big Draw at the Royal Society

Join us for a day of art and science. Help assemble a giant cell, splice together a new species of dinosaur or swap your paints for bacteria to create your own piece of living artwork.

Saturday 22 October 2016

10/22/2016

10/22/2016

In addition, we’ll have workshops exploring the concepts of mutation and talks from both artists and scientists on how their disciplines collide.Or why not take the opportunity to draw inspiration from the Royal Society’s portraits, displays and exhibitions.There’s something for all ages so grab your sketchpad and get drawing.What is The Big Draw?Founded in 2000, The Big Draw (formally The Campaign for Drawing) is an arts education charity that promotes visual literacy and the universal language of drawing as a tool for learning, expression and invention. Throughout October The Big Draw festival sees events taking place all around the globe promoting expression through art.The Big Draw’s theme for 2016 is art and science and the Royal Society is proud to feature as one of the festival’s highlight events.For more information visit the The Big Draw’s website.Attending the event Free to attend No registration required Art supplies will be provided but please feel free to bring your own materials Find information about building accessibilityFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org.

London

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PAST EVENT

Party Conference

Open for business: a nation of global researchers, innovators and industrialists

Academy of Medical Sciences, British Academy, Royal Academy of Engineering, the Royal Society

Friday 14 October 2016

10/14/2016

10/14/2016

What does the result of the UK’s referendum on EU membership mean for research and innovation in Scotland?Join our expert panel to explore how Scotland can build on its strengths in research, innovation and cutting-edge industry to shape its future role in the world.Speakers:Chaired by Professor Graeme Reid, Professor of Science and Research Policy at University College London (UCL). Speakers include Ross Martin, Chief Executive of the Scottish Council for Development and Industry and experts from research and industryThis event is taking place during the SNP party conference. You will need a conference pass to attend this event.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Party Conference

Growing tomorrow’s dinner: should GM be on the table?

Held jointly with the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

Thursday 13 October 2016

10/13/2016

10/13/2016

Ensuring everyone has enough to eat is one of this century’s global challenges. Promising techniques and technologies including selective breeding and GM technologies can develop crops that can grow in difficult, changing conditions. Scotland’ researchers are well-placed to develop this technology. Yet almost a third of people in the UK feel that the risks of GM crops outweigh the benefits. Is this true? Do we need to take another look at technologies such as GM? You will need a conference pass to attend this event.

Free Event

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PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

Brian Cox presents Science Matters – Climate Change

Pitch your questions and get answers on the climate change issues that matter to you. Climate change is an issue that will affect all of us, and will require global solutions brought about by the collaboration of…

Saturday 08 October 2016

10/08/2016

10/08/2016

Join Professor Brian Cox, the Royal Society Professor of Public Engagement, as he pitches the public’s questions to discuss the future of our planet.Brian will be joined by a panel of experts including: Sir Brian Hoskins FRS, Professor of Meteorology at University of Reading Professor Keith Shine FRS, Reigus Professor of Meteorology and Climate Science, University of Reading Professor Kate Jones, Chair of Ecology and Biodiversity at University College London Oliver Morton, briefings editor at the Economist and author of The Planet RemadeYou can follow the discussion live by following our stream from 2.00pm, Saturday 8 October.Science MattersThe Royal Society’s ‘Science Matters’ series will give the public access to scientists who are experts on the science and technology issues with the greatest global impact. You’ll be able to pitch the question that matters to you the most, to help direct the experts’ discussion.

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PAST EVENT

No series available.

On memory

Join neuroscientist Professor John Aggleton FRS and President of the Royal Society of Literature, Colin Thubron FRSL who will be discussing their different approaches to the subject of memory.

Monday 03 October 2016

10/03/2016

10/03/2016

Professor Aggleton is a world expert in the neural basis of memory. Using a mix of anatomical, behavioural and clinical methods, his research has widely expanded our understanding of how memory is stored in the brain.Colin Thubron’s recently published novel Night of Fire, focuses on the pivotal points in the lives of the inhabitants of an apartment block about to be set on fire. As part of his preparation for the novel he researched Professor Aggleton’s own work, and the character Walford – also a neurosurgeon – acts as a cypher for Thubron’s thoughts on neuroscience.In a discussion chaired by Guardian Books editor Claire Armitstead they will explore the ways in which we conceptualise memory and discuss how artistic and scientific approaches to such an abstract subject can aid one another in helping make these ideas more concrete.Attending this event Free to attend No registration required Seats allocated on a first-come, first-served basis Doors open at 6.30pm Travel and accessibility informationFor all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

London

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PAST EVENT

Party Conference

Rise of the machines: mass unemployment or luxury for all?

Royal Statistical Society and Royal Society Conservative conference fringe event

Monday 03 October 2016

10/03/2016

10/03/2016

A computer can beat a human at Go, one of the most fiendish games that mankind has created, and suggest which movie you might want to watch next. But can it substitute for a person on the end of a phone?Join us to find out what robotics and artificial intelligence can already do, where we might expect to be in twenty years’ time and what this means for government. Will computers be taking over our jobs, or creating new jobs? Will we be able to do anything without a computer knowing about it? How can we exploit this new technology to improve our lives in a way that we are all comfortable with?Speakers include: Dr Sabine Hauert, Lecturer in Robotics at the University of Bristol and Member of the Royal Society’s Machine Learning project working group Timmandra Harkness, journalist and author of Big data: does size matter? Sarah O’Connor, FT Employment Correspondent Matt Warman MP, Member of Parliament for Boston and Skegness and member of the Common Science and Technology CommitteeThis event is taking place during the Conservative party conference, but is outside the conference secure zone so accessible to those that have not bought conference passes.

Free Event

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Festival Event

Antibiotics and the cell’s protein factory

All cells have thousands of proteins that carry out the essential functions of life. The information to make proteins resides in our genes, each of which specifies a particular protein. The ribosome is the key…

Friday 23 September 2016

09/23/2016

09/23/2016

President of the Royal Society, Sir Venki Ramakrishnan talks about his groundbreaking work visualising the ribosome in atomic detail, helping us to understand how it works while simultaneously giving us an insight into how antibiotics function.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

biochemistryandmolecularcellbiology biochemistryandmolecularcellbiology biochemistryandmolecularcellbiology festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Panel Discussion

How and when will machines be able to explain themselves?

“Show your working” is a phrase that’s drilled into every maths pupil from an early age, but why do we never ask our computers to do the same?

Friday 23 September 2016

09/23/2016

09/23/2016

Machine learning has led to computers designing their own algorithms that can complete incredibly complex tasks previously thought to only be solvable by humans – from spotting a piece of spam mail to beating the world’s leading Go player. However, when we look under the bonnet of how these algorithms are put together, computer scientists are unable to gain any insight as to how the computer arrived at its solution.Join our expert panel of machine learning specialists – Joanna Bryson, Miranda Mowbray and Stephen Roberts – who will discuss how we might go about understanding the thought-process of a machine learning algorithm.This event is part of the New Scientist Live 2016.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

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PAST EVENT

Festival Event

The man who couldn’t stop

Ever had a strange urge to jump from a tall building, or steer your car into oncoming traffic? You are not alone.

Friday 23 September 2016

09/23/2016

09/23/2016

In this captivating fusion of science, history and personal memoir, writer David Adam explores the weird thoughts that exist within every mind, and how they drive millions of us towards obsessions and compulsions. David has suffered from OCD for 20 years, and The Man Who Couldn’t Stop is his unflinchingly honest attempt to understand the condition and his experiences; a book that will challenge thoughts of what is normal, and what is mental illness. Dr Adam is a writer and editor at Nature, one of the world’s top scientific journals.This event is part of the 2016 Gravity Fields festival, Grantham.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

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Festival Event

The next big thing

Join us as part of Gravity Fields festival, Grantham where three researchers discuss their work at the forefront of science. This event, featuring an all-women panel, will profile some of the most extraordinary and…

Friday 23 September 2016

09/23/2016

09/23/2016

The panel will feature Libby Gibson (the chemistry of photosynthesis), Lauren Guillette (social learning in animals), Meghan Gray (extragalactic astronomy) and will be hosted by Christine Horrocks.This event is part of the 2016 Gravity Fields festival, Grantham.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

astronomyandphysics organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology organismalbiologyevolutionandecology chemistry chemistry festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Life’s greatest secret

Every day, school students all over the planet learn that genes contain information, but where does that information come from?

Thursday 22 September 2016

09/22/2016

09/22/2016

The discovery that genes are made of DNA, the realisation that this contains information, and the suggestion that genes contain a code all took place in 1943. Professor Matthew Cobb explains the surprising interconnections between these ideas, culminating in Watson and Crick’s hypothesis that the structure of DNA contains a genetic code.This event is part of the 2016 Gravity Fields festival, Grantham.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

healthandhumansciences festivalevent pastevents

PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Einstein’s universe

Professor Foster of Oxford University and violinist Jack Liebeck collaborate to highlight Einstein’s science and his love of the violin. 

Wednesday 21 September 2016

09/21/2016

09/21/2016

Einstein’s Universe explores his scientific work on quantum mechanics with an introduction to his life and involvement with music and how his ideas have shaped our concepts of space, time and the evolution of the Universe. Musical accompaniment is from J.S. Bach’s Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin, some of Einstein’s favourite music and punctuated by other musical interludes.This event is part of the 2016 Gravity Fields festival, Grantham.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

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PAST EVENT

Festival Event

Gravity Fields Festival 2016

21 – 23 September 2016

09/21/2016

09/23/2016

Join the Royal Society at Gravity Fields festival, Grantham where we will be bringing some of the biggest and brightest stars from the Royal Society’s research fellowship, the best writers from the Royal Society Science Book Prize and President of the Royal Society Sir Venki Ramakrishnan.Follow the links to find out more about each event and book your tickets.For all enquiries, please contact events@royalsociety.org

£4 – £9